LONDON, CITY OF

ARMS: Argent a Cross Gules in the first quarter a Sword in pale point upwards of the last.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Dragon's sinister Wing Argent charged on the underside with a Cross throughout Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Dragon Argent charged on the undersides of the wings with a Cross throughout Gules.

Motto 'DOMINE DIRIGE NOS' - Lord, direct us.
Arms "anciently recorded". Crest (on a Peer's helmet) and Supporters confirmed and granted 30th April 1957.

city of london arms

.The shield combines the cross of St George with the emblem of the City's patron, St Paul, who, according to tradition, was martyred by being beheaded with that weapon.
It is therefore likely that the City's shield, from its combination of the Cross of St. George with the Sword of St. Paul, was intended to symbolise England and London, its capital; the first cathedral having been dedicated to St. Paul in 605. There is no record of any grant of arms ever having been made to the City; the shield in fact, was in use a hundred years before the incorporation of the College of Arms in 1483. It is, however, recognised as authentic by the College, where the shield, without crest and supporters, is thus described:-

Argent a Cross Gules in the first quarter a Sword in pale point upwards of the last.

The arms therefore are anciently recorded, but the crest (on a Peer’s helmet) and supporters were confirmed and granted on 30th April 1957. A popular, but erroneous legend is that the short Roman sword on the City's shield represents the dagger with which Sir William Walworth, the Mayor, stabbed the rebel, Wat Tyler, in Smithfield, on June 15th, 1381. This is inconsistent with the fact that the arms were in use before Tyler's death.
The origin of the crest and supporters is to be found in a sixteenth century, when in 1539, they first appeared on the new reverse of the Common Seal. At first the Crest consisted of a fanlike object, charged with the Cross of St. George, but by 1677, the fan had come to be mistaken for a dragon's wing, and early in the seventeenth century the Corporation invented a pair of dragon supporters to match it. The introduction of the Dragons, may also have been influenced by the legend of St. George, the City shield and that of St. George of England being the same, though the former has the Sword of St. Paul in addition to the Cross.
The crest and supporters are, therefore, based on an error. Over the years, they have been subject to those variations which frequently occur in heraldry of which there is no official record; for instance, the crest is sometimes shown as consisting of a pair of wings, and the cross on the wings varies in form.


BARKING AND DAGENHAM, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per saltire Gules and barry wavy of eight Argent and Azure in chief between two Keys in saltire a Sword palewise point downwards in base two Croziers with Sudarium in saltire surmounting a Lily slipped and leaved and in the flanks a representation of a Barking Well Smack in full sail to the sinister and a Cog Wheel all Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure in front of a demi Sun in splendour Or a representation of the Curfew Tower of Barking proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Or gorged with a Collar per pale Sable and Gules holding a Torched inflamed Or.
BADGE: A Roundel per pale Sable and Gules charged with two Croziers and a Lily as in the Arms.

Motto 'DEI GRATIA PROBEMUR REBUS' - By the grace of God let us be judged by our deeds.
Granted 1st September 1965.

The London Borough of Barking and Dagenham was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Barking and the Borough of Dagenham, except for two small portions of each transferred to neighbouring Boroughs.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

barking and dagenham lb arms
barking and dagenham badge
Badge

The blue and white waves, seen in the arms of the Borough of Dagenham, represent the River Thames which forms the Borough's southern boundary and plays an important part in its industrial life. The sword and keys symbols respectively of St. Paul and St. Peter, refer to the dedication of the old Parish Church of Dagenham. The croziers, from the arms of the Borough of Barking, and the lily, from the arms of the Borough of Dagenham, represent Barking Abbey, founded about 670 and dissolved in 1539. The parishes of Barking and Dagenham were part of the manor belonging to the Abbey. The Barking Well Smack, invented early in the eighteenth century, enabled fishermen to bring back their catch alive from the Dogger Bank and even beyond, represents the ancient and important fishing industry at Barking and the cog wheel represents industry in general.
The sun, like that in the crest of the Borough of Dagenham, denotes the progress of the area and the Curfew Tower taken from the crest of the Borough of Barking, was formerly used as a device by its predecessor the Barking UDC. The lions holding touches were supporters of the Borough of Barking arms, they stand for the Cecil and Monteagle families and the torches represent the then main industries, namely gas and electricity.


BARNET, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Azure on a Mount in base Vert a Pascal Lamb proper on a Chief per pale Agent and Gules a Saxon Crown Or between two Roses counterchanged barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a two bladed Airscrew in pale winged and issuant Or two Swords in saltire points upward proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister a Stag Argent each charged on the shoulder with a Cross potent quadrate Gules.

Motto 'UNITAS EFFICIT MINISTERIUM'.
Granted 1st January 1965.

The London Borough of Barnet was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Finchley, the Borough of Hendon, the Barnet Urban District, the East Barnet Urban District and the Friern Barnet Urban District.

Picture thanks to Robert Coselli.

barnet lb arms
barnet udc device
Device formerly used by the Barnet UDC

The pascal lamb upon a green hill, from the arms of the Borough of Hendon, symbolises the origin of the name Hendon 'at the high down', combined with the badge, derived from the weather vane of the ancient parish church of St. Mary's, Hendon. This lamb and flag badge was previously used by the Hendon UDC and its predecessor, the Local Board. The Saxon crown, from the arms of Middlesex County Council, refers to the fact that a large part of the London Borough was once part of that county. The red and white roses, from the device of the Barnet UDC and the arms of the East Barnet UDC, refer to the Battle of Barnet, the climactic confrontation of the Wars of the Roses.
The winged airscrew, from the crest of the Borough of Hendon, refers to the former borough's links with aviation. The swords, also from the device of the Barnet UDC and the arms of the East Barnet UDC, are a further reference to the Battle of Barnet.
The lion and stag are derived from the supporters of the Borough of Finchley, where the lion was derived from the heraldry of the Compton Family, former holders of the Manor. The stag symbolised the game once hunted by Tudor monarchs in the forests hereabouts. The crosses are from the crest of the Friern Barnet UDC, they represent the Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, who held the ancient priory there.


BEXLEY, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per saltire Or and barry wavy of six Argent and Azure a Saltire Gules between in chief an Oak Tree eradicated proper fructed Or and in base a Cog Wheel Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules on the Battlements of a Port between two Towers Argent masoned Sable a Horse forcene Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag Gules attired and unguled Or gorged with a Collar wavy Argent thereon a Bar wavy Azure.

Motto 'BOLDLY AND RIGHTLY'.
Granted 20th May 1965.

The London Borough of Bexley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Bexley, the Borough of Erith, the Crayford Urban District and part of Chislehurst and Sidcup Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

bexley lb arms

The wavy blue and white bars represent the rivers Thames, Cray and Shuttle, common to the four areas comprising the London Borough. The gold areas of the field refers to agricultural and mineral wealth and the cog wheel to industry. The oak tree is taken from the arms of the Borough of Bexley, where it represented the woods, which formerly abounded in the area, and survive in many wooded parks.
The white horse, from the crest of the Borough of Bexley and the arms of the Crayford UDC, is derived from the arms of Kent County Council. The horse stands upon a turreted gateway, symbolic of the Borough being the gateway to Kent and the South, such a gateway formed part of the device used by Chislehurst and Sidcup UDC.
The red stags are derived from the crest of the Borough of Erith and their collars are a further reference to the rivers of the area.


BRENT, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per chevron Gules and Vert a Chevron wavy Argent between in dexter chief an Orb ensigned with a Cross crosslet Or and in sinister chief two Swords in saltire proper Pommels and Hilts Or points upwards and in base two Seaxes in saltire proper Pommels and Hilts Or enfiled with a saxon Crown Or.
CREST: Within a Saxon Crown Or on a Mount Vert a Lion statant guardant Or charged on the shoulder with a Cinquefoil Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Or supporting a Staff Gules with a Banner Vert charged with a Balance Or on the sinister side a Dragon Azure supporting a Staff Vert with a Banner Gules charged with three Lilies Argent Mantled Gules doubled Argent the whole upon a Grassy Mound divided by Water Argent charged with a Pale wavy Azure.

Motto 'FORWARD TOGETHER'.
Granted 1st September 1965.

The London Borough of Brent was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Wembley and the Borough of Willesden.

brent lb arms

The wavy chevron represents the River Brent, which once seperated the two former boroughs, but whose name now unites them. The orb and crossed swords are from the arms of the Borough of Willesden, they represent King Athelstan, who granted the Manors of Neasden-cum-Willesden to the Monastry of St. Arkenwold and the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's Cathedral, who held the manor at the time if the Domesday Survey. The crossed seaxes and Saxon crown on a green background, from the arms of the Borough of Wembley, are derived from the arms of the Middlesex County Council.
The lion standing within the Saxon crown, from the crest of the Borough of Wembley, is the Lion of England and the red cinquefoil, from the crest of the Borough of Willesden, is taken from the arms of All Souls College, Oxford, which owns land in the area.
The lion, one of the supporters of the Borough of Wembley, alludes to John Lyon, founder of a trust for the maintenance of Harrow and Edgeware Roads, portions of which lie within the Borough. The balance is the symbol of the Hundred Moot of Gore. The dragon, one of the supporters of the Borough of Willesden, also carries a banner with three lilies, emblem of St. Mary, the patron saint of Willesden.


BROMLEY, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Vert a pierced Cinqefoil Argent within an orle of Acorns Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours two Swords in saltire Gules ensigned by an Escallop Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Dragon and on the sinister side a Horse both Argent.
BADGE: A Sword Argent hilt and pomel Or and a Branch of Oak fructed proper in saltire.

Motto 'SERVIRE POPULO' - To serve the people.
Granted 20th April 1965.

The London Borough of Bromley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Beckenham, the Borough of Bromley, the Orpington Urban District, the Penge Urban District and part of the Chislehurst and Sidcup Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

bromley lb arms

The green background is appropriate to an area including some of the most heavily wooded and pleasant green areas within Greater London, and the five-petalled cinquefoil, denotes to union of the five former authorities. The acorns refer to the Kentish oaks - characteristic flora of the county - and also represent the seed of the new London Borough.
The crossed swords refer to London and the escallop shell, like that in the arms of the Borough of Bromley, is from the arms of the Diocese of Rochester.
The supporters are the famous white horse of Kent, the county in which the London Borough was formerly situated and a white dragon, similar to the supporters of the arms of the City of London.


CAMDEN, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Argent on a Cross Gules a Mitre Or a Chief Sable thereon three Escallops Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Mural Crown Argent a demi Elephant Sable armed Or about the neck a Wreath of Holly fructed proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister side a Griffin Or each gorged with a Collar the dexter Argent charged with three Mullets Sable the sinister Gules charged with three Mullets Or and pendent from the collar of each a Fountain.
BADGE: On a Roundel tierced in pairle reversed Gules Azure and Sable fimbriated Or an Elephant's Head erased Argent armed Or.

Motto 'NON SIBI SED TOTI' - Not for self but for all.
Granted 10th September 1965.

The London Borough of Camden was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Hampstead, Holborn and St Pancras.

camden lb arms
camden badge
Badge

The red cross on a white field, taken from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Holborn, represents the churches of St. George-the-Martyr and St. George, Bloomsbury. The gold mitre, like that in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Hampstead, refers to the Westminster Abbey which held the Manor of Hampstead from the end of the tenth century until 1539. The three white scallop shells, like those in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of St. Pancras and Holborn, are taken from the arms of the Russell family, Dukes of Bedford, owners of land in both former boroughs.
The mural crown a common civic symbol is like that in the crest of Holborn. The elephant derived from the elephants' heads in the arms of St. Pancras is from the heraldry of the Marquess Camden, another of th area's land owners, for whom Camden Town was named. The wreath of holly around its neck, like the one in the crest of Hampstead is from the seal of the old Hampstead Vestry.
The supporters are similar to those of Holborn and reperesent the two Inns of Court in the Borough, the lion is that of the De Lacys, Earls of Lincoln, whose London home became Lincoln's Inn, and the griffin is from the arms of Gray's Inn. Instead of the shields worn around the neck by the old supporters the new ones each wear a fountain, referring to the 'old bourne' from which Holborn derives its name.


CROYDON, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Argent on a Cross flory at the ends Sable five Bezants between in chief to the dexter two Swords Azure and Gules in saltire and to the sinister two Keys Azure and Gules in saltire.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a Fountain between a Branch of Oak leaved and fructed and one of Beech slipped proper.
SUPPORTERS On the dexter side a Lion sableand on the sinister side a Horse Argent each with a Cross formy fitchy pendent from a Collar counter-changed.
BADGE: A Fountain charged with a Cross flory at the ends Sable thereon five Bezants.

Motto 'AD SUMMA NITAMUR' - Let us strive for perfection.
Granted 10th December 1965.

The London Borough of Croydon was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Croydon and the Coulsdon and Purley Urban District. In 1969 the Parish of Farleigh was transferred back to Surrey.

croydon lb arms
croydon badge
Badge

The flowering cross is derived, like that in the arms of the County Borough of Croydon, from the arms of John Whitgift, Archbishop of Canterbury during the reign of Elizabeth I, whose benfactions to the town include two schools bearing his name. The crossed keys, as seen in the crest of the Coulsdon and Purley UDC, and swords refer to the Abbey of St. Peter and St. Paul of Chertsey, which was granted the Manor of Coulsdon in 727. The keys also refer to the Abbey of St. Peter of Winchester, which acquired the Manor of Sanderstead in 964.
The heraldic fountain, from the crest of the old County Borough, is a symbol for water and refers to the source of the River Wandle. The branches of oak and beech are suggested by the two trees in the arms of Coulsdon and Purley UDC, where they refered to the wooded nature of the area and to Purley Oaks and Purley Beeches in particular.
The black lion is also derived from the arms of Coulsdon and Purley and is a further reference to Hyde Abbey, the later name of the Abbey of St. Peter of Winchester, mentioned above. The white horse is from the heraldry of the Earls of Surrey, the county in which the two constiuent authorities where formerly situated. The crosses formy fitchy are from the arms of the See of Canterbury and recall further the long association with the Archbishops, through the Manor of Croydon. Three such crosses appeared in the arms of the former County Borough.


EALING, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Argent issuant from a Grassy Mount in base an Oak Tree proper fructed Or on a Chief Gules three Saxon Crowns Or.

Motto 'PROGRESS WITH UNITY'.
Granted 1st September 1965.

The London Borough of Ealing was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Acton, the Borough of Ealing and the Borough of Southall.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

ealing lb arms

The oak tree is common to the former arms of the Borough of Ealing and the Borough of Acton, in which it referred to the ancient forest west of London in which so many of the modern settlements originated, and which is recalled in the name of Acton "oak-town"). The oak is also appropriate to the origins of Southall "the southern holt" and Norwood "the northern wood". It is shown with twenty golden acorns to represent the original twenty wards of the London Borough, against a white background, as in the former Ealing arms, and firmly rooted in a grassy base as in those of Acton. The chief follows the pattern of the Acton arms which also had a chief above its oak tree. This is coloured red, the background of the former arms of the Middlesex CC, and bears three Saxon crowns in gold, reminiscent of the three former Middlesex boroughs and of the county itself, which was similarly symbolised in the Greater London Council arms. One such crown appeared in the Middlesex arms, which were included in those of Acton, and two such crowns decorated the necks of the supporters of the Borough of Southall arms.


ENFIELD, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Or on a Fesse wavy Vert a Bar wavy Argent charged with a Barrulet wavy Azure over all an Enfield rampant Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a Stag's Head proper wreathed about the neck with a Garland of Roses Gules barbed seeded slipped and leaved proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Gules gorged with a Collar engrailed with Chain reflexed over the back and charged with a Saltire couped Or and on the sinister side an Enfield Gules.
BADGE: On a Pentagon wavy Or fimbriated concentrically Vert Argent and Azure Argent and Vert an Enfield rampant Gules.

Motto 'BY INDUSTRY EVER STRONGER'.
Granted 15th August 1966.

The London Borough of Enfield was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Edmonton, the Borough of Enfield and the Borough of Southgate.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

enfield lb arms
enfield badge
Badge

The green, silver and blue wavy horizontal bars represent the Borough's connection with the New River, the Green Belt areas and open spaces. The principal charge, as in the arms of the former Borough of Enfield, is a mythological heraldic creature, known as an "Enfield", which has the head of a fox, the chest of a hound, the talons of an eagle, the body of a lion and the hindquarters and tail of a wolf.
The stag's head and wreath of red roses are derived from the supporters of the Borough of Southgate, where the stags referred to the former forests and the red roses recalled the association with the Duchy of Lancaster.
The chained lion charged with a saltire is derived from the supporters of the Borough of Edmonton, where they typified courage and determination. The Enfield is derived from the Arms.


GREENWICH, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per chevron Argent and Gules in chief an Hour Glass proper between two Estoiles Azure and in base three Cannon Barrels erect palewise proper each surmounted on the breech by a Lion's Face Or.

Motto 'WE GOVERN BY SERVING'.
Granted 1st October 1965.

The London Borough of Greenwich was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Greenwich and Woolwich.

greenwich lb arms

The hour glass and radiated stars, as in the arms of the former Metropolitan Borough of Greenwich, symbolise the unique position it occupies as the place from which the standard of time is taken and its historic association (in relation to the celebrated observatory) with the point from which astronomical calculations are made. The three cannon barrels, like those in the arms of the former Metropolitan Borough of Woolwich, perpetuate the long association of that borough with the Royal Arsenal.


HACKNEY, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per fess in chief per fess Sable and Argent a Maltese Cross per fess Argent and Gules between two Oak Trees eradicated Or fructed Gules and in the base Gules three Bells Or the whole within a Bordure barruly wavy Argent and Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules on a Mount Vert a representation of the Tower of the Ancient Parish Church of St. Augustine Hackney proper.
BADGE: On an Ellipse barruly wavy Argent and Azure a Delf per fess Sable and Argent fimbriated Or charged with a Maltese Cross per fess Argent and Gules ensigned by a representation of the Tower of the Ancient Parish Church of St. Augustine Hackney proper.

Granted 25th July 1969.

The London Borough of Hackney was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Hackney, Shoreditch and Stoke Newington.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hackney lb arms
hackney badge
Badge

The border of blue and white wavy lines represents the water of the rivers and canals on or near the borough's boundaries. The red and white Maltese Cross and the black and white background, like that in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Hackney, commemorates the Orders of the Knights Templar and Knights of St. John. The Knights Templar wore a red Maltese Cross on white surcoats and mantles and the Knights of St. John wore black surcoats and mantles with a white Maltese Cross on the left breast. In 1312 the Knights Templar were suppressed and their lands and rents, including those in Hackney, were transferred to the Knights of St. John. The two golden oak trees with red acorns derive from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Stoke Newington and recall the forest which once covered the northern part of the Borough. The three golden bells represent the Bells of St. Leonard's Church, Shoreditch, referred to in the nursery rhyme. "Oranges and Lemons".
The Crest consists of a representation of the tower of the former Parish Church of St. Augustine, Hackney, which is the only part now standing and the only scheduled Ancient Monument within the Borough. The green mound, represents the island in the River Lea - "Hacon's Eyot" - from which the name "Hackney" is thought by some authorities to have been derived.


HAMMERSMITH AND FULHAM, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Barry wavy Argent and Azure two Hammers in saltire interlaced with a Horseshoe Or on a Chief Gules two Swords in saltire proper hilts and pomels Or a Mitre of the last.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Sanguine out of a Mural Crown of six Turrets Or an ancient Ship oars in action Sable sail set flags and pennon flying Sanguine the sail charged with two Hammers in saltire interlaced with a Horseshoe Or; Mantled Azure doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On each side a Male Griffin Gules beaked and irradiated Or armed and langued Azure each gorged with a Cord Or pendent from that of the dexter an Escallop and from that of the sinister a Cross Crosslet Argent.
BADGE: Two Hammers in saltire interlaced with a Horseshoe Or.

Motto 'SPECTEMUR AGENDO' - Let us be judged by our actions.
Granted 1st March 1965.

The London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Fulham and Hammersmith.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hammersmith and fulham arms
hammersmith and fulham badge
Badge

The blue and white waves, as in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Fulham, represent the River Thames. On this appear two hammers and horseshoe forged by the smith which is a punning device, to denote the name Hammersmith, both emblems appeared in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Hammersmith. Horseshoes were also a part of the arms of Sir Nicholas Crispe, whose benefactions to the church and brick-making industry of Hammersmith had much to do with its growth. The cross swords are taken from the arms of the See of London, these represents Fulham's most ancient historical association, as the Parishes of Fulham and Hammersmith formerly constituted a Manor, the Lords of which were the Bishops of London, represented by the mitre.
The an ancient ship, represents the wintering of the Danes on Thameside in 879. It is similar to that used by Fulham, but the sail has been charged with the horseshoe and hammers of the new Borough. The sail, flags and pennons are shown in dark red (sanguine in heraldry), appropriate to the blood-thirsty nature of the marauders.
The male griffins; fabulous monsters, half lion, half eagle, but instead of wings they are irradiated with bursts of rays. This emblem of vigilance symbolises the joining of two entities each of great strength and excellence, namely the King of the Birds and the King of the Beasts into one ancient heraldic creature, the rays symbolising enlightenment and advancement, whilst the pointed ears symbolise watchfulness in the interest of the ratepayers. On one side are suspended from a cord, is a cross crosslet for Edward Latymer, who died in 1626 and left lands for the benefit of the "poore of the towne of Hammersmith" and for the education of the "eight poor boys". On the other side is an escallop shell for George Pring, who was a surgeon at Hammersmith, and was the projector of the Suspension Bridge, but he died in 1824, before the project could be carried to completion, the bridge being opened in 1827: the building of the bridge greatly contributed to the development of the town by reason of the increased facilities it afforded for communication between the two banks of the river.
The motto chosen in 1965 was 'JUDGE BY OUR LABOUR', in 1969 the Borough reverted to the original motto of Hammersmith 'SPECTEMUR AGENDO'.


HARINGEY, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Sable eight Rays [of Lightning] issuing from the fess point throughout Or.
CREST On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a demi Sun in Splendour Or a demi Cog Wheel Sable.
BADGE: Eight Rays [as in the Arms].

Motto 'PROGRESS WITH HUMANITY'.
Granted 10th May 1965.

The London Borough of Haringey was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Hornsey, the Borough of Tottenham and the Borough of Wood Green.

haringey lb arms
haringey badge
Badge

These arms are unusual in that they do not combine elements from the previous arms. The rays are intended to represent action and dymanism, and also recall that the first television broadcast was made from Alexandra Palace in the borough.
The crest has a rising sun behind a cogwheel, appropriate for a progressive industrial community.


HARROW, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Or a Fesse arched Vert in chief on a Pile Gules between a Torch Sable enflamed proper and a Quill Pen of the fourth a Clarion of the first and in base upon a Mount issuant a Hurst of Trees of the second.
CREST Issuant from a Mural Crown proper a demi Lion holding between the paws an Arrow fessewise Argent enfiled with a Wreath of Oak also proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a representation of Hygeia supporting with her exterior hand a Staff entwined with a Snake and on the sinister side a Benedictine Monk supporting with his exterior hand a Staff all proper.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA LEX' - The well-being of the people is the highest law.
Arms and crest granted 3rd May 1938, to the Harrow Urban District Council. Supporters granted 10th September 1954, to the Harrow Borough Council.

harrow arms

The green arched fess indicates the large proportion of open spaces in the Borough, and the interest of the area in the Green Belt. The torch of refers to knowledge and the quill (pen), represents, heraldically, the Pinner area and the eminent writers who have been associated with the Borough. The triangular red "pile" represents in shape the Gore in which were held the meetings of the Saxon Moot of the old Saxon parish of Harrow and refers also to the present petty sessional division; the "pile" was also a feature of the arms of the Chandos family. The organ rest alludes to the connection of Handel with the Borough. The clump of trees represents the Wealdstone and Harrow Weald areas which, until comparatively recently, were part of the great Weald of Middlesex, the trees stand on a mound typifying the Hill of Harrow-on-the-Hill.
The mural crown is a typical symbol of civic government and the lion holding an oak wreath through which is a silver arrow is derived from the crest of Harrow School.
Hygeia, the Goddess of Health, typifies the excellent health record of the Borough. The Benedictine Monk recalls the long association of the Borough with the Church through the Archbishops of Canterbury, the ancient Bentley Priory and in other directions.


HAVERING, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per saltire Argent and Azure a Gem Ring Or set with a Ruby proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a Castled Gateway with three Towers Or masoned Sable the windows and middle Tower domed Azure ensigned with a Cross Gules and the outer Towers each with a Steeple Azure issuant above the port a Bull's Head and Neck affronty proper.
BADGE: A bull's head caboshed proper within a gem ring Or set with a ruby proper.

Motto 'LIBERTY'.
Granted 1st March 1965.

The London Borough of Havering was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Romford and the Hornchurch Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

havering lb arms
havering badge
Badge

The division of the shield per saltire represents Upminster Windmill. The ring, from the arms of the Borough of Romford, refers to the ring which according to legend, Edward the Confessor gave to an old pilgrim as Alms, at the consecration of St. John's Church at the place later called Havering.
The gatehouse, like that in the crest of the Borough of Romford, is believed to represent the gatehouse of Havering Palace, it appeared previously in the seals of the Liberty of Havering and the Romford UDC. The bull's head from the crest of the Hornchurch UDC is derived from the stone bull's head with copper horn which is built into the gable-end of the Parish Church.


HILLINGDON, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Vert an Eagle displayed per pale Or and Argent in the dexter claw a Fleur-de-Lys Or and in the sinister claw a Cog-Wheel Argent on a Chief Or four Civic Crowns Vert.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Circlet of Brushwood Sable a demi-Lion Gules with wings Argent the underside of each wing charged with a Cross Gules and holding between the paws a Bezant thereon a Mullet Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Heraldic Tiger Or gorged with an Astral Crown Azure and charged on the shoulder with a Rose Gules charged with another Argent barbed and seeded proper and on the sinister side a Stag proper attired and gorged with a Circlet of Brushwood and charged on the shoulder with two Ears of Rye slipped in saltire Or.
BADGE: A Roundel Vert surmounted of a Mullet of seven points Argent charged with a Mural Crown Gules.

Motto 'FORWARD'.
Granted 22nd March 1965.

The London Borough of Hillingdon was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Uxbridge, the Hayes and Harlington Urban District, the Ruislip-Northwood Urban District and the Yiewsley and West Drayton Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hillingdon lb arms
hillingdon badge
Badge

The silver half of the eagle on a green field and the gold half on a red field are taken from the arms of the Yiewsley and West Drayton UDC and the Borough of Uxbridge respectively. In both cases the eagle was taken from the arms of the Paget family. The Manor of West Drayton was given to Sir William Paget, the first Lord Paget, by Henry VIII In 1547 and the Paget family subsequently also owned the Manors of Harmondsworth and Dawley. Henry Paget, the seventh Lord Paget, was created Earl of Uxbridge in 1714. The eagle, being an heraldic symbol of flight, is also used as an allusion to Heathrow Airport, the Royal Air Force Depot at Uxbridge and Northolt Airport. The cog-wheel comes from the arms of the Hayes and Harlington UDC and refers to the many modern industries in the district. The fleur-de-lys is from the arms of the Ruislip-Northwood UDC and represents the lily symbol of purity of St. Mary, one of the saints to whom the Abbey of Bec in Normandy and King's College at Cambridge were dedicated. The four civic crowns of oakleaves and acorns refer to the four former authorities.
The red half-lion is from the Uxbridge crest and represents the British national lion and the wings with St. George's cross are derived from those in the Yiewsley and West Drayton crest. The blue star on a gold roundel shows in reversed colours the North Star from the Ruislip-Northwood arms, here it is now also to be regarded as a reference to the airports by virtue of the use of the North Star in visual navigation. The black circlet of brushwood is from the Hayes and Harlington crest, in reference to the derivation of the name Hayes.
The tiger is one of the supporters of the former Uxbridge arms and is taken from the heraldry of the Earl of Uxbridge, whose chief title is Marquess of Anglesey. The blue astral crown alludes to Uxbridge's connection with the Royal Air Force. The Tudor Rose is from the Yiewsley and West Drayton crest, where in combination with the wings it represented the arrival of Queen Elizabeth II by air when she first set foot on British soil after her accession. It is also an English Royal Badge. The stag with circlet of brushwood comes from the Hayes and Harlington crest and refers to the time when a large part of the area was wooded. The two ears of rye 'slipped' are from the Ruislip-Northwood crest and are a punning reference to the name Ruislip.
The seven pointed star of the badge represents the seven districts - Harlington, Hayes, Northwood, Ruislip, Uxdridge, West Drayton and Yiewsley united in to one London Borough (the red mural crown) surrounded by the Green Belt (the green roundel).


HOUNSLOW, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per fesse Azure and Gules on a Fesse wavy between in chief two Wings conjoined in base Argent surmounted of a Sword erect Or and in base a Lion rampant guardant per fesse Or and Argent a barrulet wavy Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon Ferns proper a Talbot passant Sable supporting over the dexter shoulder a Post Horn Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Griffin Or gorged with a Collar gemel wavy Azure and charged on the wings with a Seax, the cutting edge inwards proper pomel and hilt Gules.
BADGE: In front of two Wings Argent each charged with two Barrulets wavy Azure a Seax erect proper pomel and hilt Gules the blade surmounted of a Lion's Face Or.

Motto 'JUNCTI PROGREDIAMUR' - Let us go forward together".
Granted 3rd Sep­tember 1964.

The London Borough of Hounslow was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, the Borough of Heston and Isleworth and the Feltham Urban District.

hounslow lb arms

The white wings and sword are from the arms of the Feltham UDC, where they represented London Airport and the district's close association with the aircraft industry. The sword also referred to the Royal Army Ordnance Depot. The gold and silver lion is from the arms of the Borough of Heston and Isleworth, and is taken from the arms of Hounslow Priory, founded in the thirteenth century by the Trinitarian Brothers of Redemption, on the site now occupied by Holy Trinity Church. The wavy blue and white bars are like those in the arms of the Borough of Brentford and Chiswick, where they referred to the River Brent and the Borough's situation beside the River Thames.
The black talbot (or hound) stand­ing in fern and supporting over its shoulder a golden post horn, is intended to provide a "play" on the name Hounslow and the post horn alludes to the extensive posting business of that place Informer times.
The supporters are derived from those granted to the Borough of Brentford and Chiswick in 1932 heraldically differenced by the introduction of the seaxes in reference to the fact that the districts comprising the London Borough of Hounslow are all within the County of Middlesex. The achievement rests upon a compartment depicted as a grassy mound strewn with fern, which can be seen as an illusion to Hounslow Heath.
The badge embodies emblems from the arms of all three civic authori­ties merged as the London Borough of Hounslow and from the arms of Middlesex.


ISLINGTON, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Barry wavy Argent and Azure a Maltese Cross Argent surmounted by an open Book proper edged and on a chief Gules a Crescent between two Annulets Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules in front of a Water Bouget Sable an Arrow erect proper barbed and flighted Argent.
BADGE: A Fountain charged with a Crescent and an Annulet interlaced Or.

Motto 'WE SERVE'.
Granted 3rd February 1966.

The London Borough of Islington was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Finsbury and Islington.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

islington lb arms
islington badge
Badge

The background of the shield comprises a wavy field in blue and white symbolising the associations of the Borough with water, particularly the New River and the Maltese Cross refers to the Order of St. John of Jerusalem, whose headquarters were at St. John's Gate, and who were connected with both former boroughs. The book of symbolises the educational institutions in the Borough which now include Polytechnic of North London and the City University (formerly the Northampton College of Advanced Technology). The gold crescent and annulets, seen in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Finsbury, on the red chief are taken from the arms of Thomas Sutton, the founder of the Charterhouse and the arms of Sir Richard Whittington.
The water-bouget, as in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Islington, was taken from the arms of the Berners family who became possessed of lands in Islington after the Norman Conquest — known as Bernersbury, afterwards, Barnsbury. The arrow symbolises the past association of the Borough with archery.


KENSINGTON AND CHELSEA, ROYAL BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Gules a Mitre Or on a Chief Ermine three Crowns Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Mount Vert a Broom Bush flowered proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Boar Azure and on the sinister side a winged Bull Argent armed and unguled Or.

Motto 'QUAM BONUM IN UNUM HABITARE' - What a good thing it is to dwell together in unity.
Granted 10th December 1965.

The Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Chelsea and Kensington.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

kensington and chelsea lb arms

The title "Royal Borough" was originally granted to the Kensington Council by Royal Charter dated 20th November, 1901, to fulfil a wish expressed by Queen Victoria to confer a distinction on her birth place. The use of this Royal Title was graciously conferred by Letters Patent dated 7th April, 1964, on the new borough.
The three Crowns on ermine symbolise the Royal status of the Borough, and the Abbot's mitre, like that in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Kensington, signifies the centuries old connection of Kensington with the Abbey of Abingdon and of Chelsea with the Abbey of Westminster.
The bush of broom indicates the connecting link between the two former boroughs of the "Brompton" Ward of Kensington which, for Parliamentary purposes, at the time of the grant formed part of the constituency of Chelsea. Brompton, in mediaeval times, was an area famous for its fields of gorse and the name itself is a corruption of "Broom tun", a gorse farm.
The blue boar is taken from the arms of the De Vere family who were Lords of the Manor of Kensington for 500 years. The silver winged bull, like that in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Chelsea, is associated with St. Luke, the Patron Saint of the ancient Parish of Chelsea.
The motto is the latin version of the opening words of the 133rd Psalm


KINGSTON UPON THAMES, ROYAL BOROUGH OF
Link to Royal Borough of Kingston Web Site

ARMS: Azure three Salmon naiant in pale Argent finned and tailed Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuing from a Wreath of Bay Leaves Vert Banded Or a demi Stag proper gorged with a Crown Or pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Ermine on a Chevron Vert between two Chevronels the upper one per pale Azure and Gules and the lower one per pale Gules and Azure a Cross Pattee Or holding between the forelegs a Fountain.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag proper gorged with a Riband Argent pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Azure issuant from the base an Elm Tree proper in front of a Sun rising Or and resting the interior hind hoof on a charred Woodstock the whole upon a Grassy Mount proper supported by a Fillet wavy per fess wavy Argent and Azure.
BADGE: A Roundel of the Arms encircled by a Wreath of Elm and Bay Vert tied with a Riband and ensigned by a Saxon Crown Or.

Granted 7th March 1966.

The Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Malden and Coombe, the former Royal Borough of Kingston and the Borough of Surbiton.

kingston upon thames lb arms

The shield is the ancient arms of the former Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, recorded in 1572 and 1623. It bears three salmon on blue in reference to the three fisheries mentioned in Domesday Book.
The crest consists of that of the Borough of Malden and Coombe, with the addition of that borough's shield hanging from the crown about the stag's neck. The shield has reference to Malden and Coombe's connexions with the Crown and Merton College, Oxford, and the stag is a reminder that part of Richmond Park is within the area.
The supporters are those of the Borough of Surbiton, with its shield hanging from their necks. The elm in the shield recalls the ancient Hundred of Elmbridge, and the stags, which link thematically with that in the new crest, are those of the Coutts family. The whole coat of arms rests on a grassy base edged with waves, symbolising the Royal Borough's situation on the Thames, and preserves virtually intact the heraldry of all the constituent boroughs.
The badge displays the Kingston salmon surrounded by leaves from the Surbiton elm and the Malden and Coombe bay, and surmounted by a Saxon crown in reference to the Royal Borough's title.


LAMBETH, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Quarterly per fesse wavy first Argent a Cross Gules second and third Ermine a Mullet Or and fourth chequy Or and Azure over all a Pale Sable thereon a Crosier surmounted by a Mitre also Or all within a Bordure Sable charged with fifteen Bezants.
CREST On a Wreath of the Colours upon Water proper a Paschal Lamb Argent ducally gorged supporting over the dexter shoulder a Crosier Or flowing therefrom a Pennon also Argent charged with a Cross Gules.

Motto 'SPECTEMUR AGENDO' - Let us be regarded according to our conduct.
Granted 15th March 1966.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

lambeth lb arms

The arms with the exception of the two gold stars are identical to the arms of the Lambeth Metropolitan Borough Council.
The fifteen golden circles (or bezants), are taken from the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall, whose London estates are at Kennington in the Borough. These bezants are supposed to have had their origin in the time when the Crusaders brought back golden coins from Byzantium. The red cross is the cross of St. George and is from the arms of the former London County Council. The blue and gold squares form the arms of the Warennes, Earls of Surrey, and this device also appeared on the seal of the Surrey County Council, as Lambeth was formerly in that county. The mitre and pastoral staff are ecclesiastical emblems, and refer to the fact that the Archbishops of Canterbury have had their residence at Lambeth Palace since the 13th century. The two quarters ermine are associated with the use of ermine fur for the monarch and the nobility of the nation as a symbol of the purity and stainless honour that should be conspicuous in its wearers. The two gold five-pointed stars (or mullets) in these quarters symbolise the two parishes of Clapham and Streatham which were previously part of the former Metropolitan Borough of Wandsworth.
The paschal lamb with pennon has always formed part of the seal of the late Vestry and of the Borough Council, and in heraldic terms is a "canting" or punning reference to the name of the Borough. The wavy lines under the lamb represent water, and refer to the fact that the Borough has a considerable frontage to the River Thames.


LEWISHAM, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Tierced in pairle reversed Purpure Vert and Sable on a Pall also reversed Argent five Bars wavy Azure between in chief two Lions' Faces each crowned with a Saxon Crown and in base a Lymphad sail set Pennon and Flags flying Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Purpure between two Dolphins haurient and addorsed Vert a Mullet Or all between two Wings displayed Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Horse Argent crined and unguled Or and on the sinister side a Stag Argent attired and unguled Or each gorged with a Mural Crown Gules.
BADGE: Within an Annulet a Saxon Crown Or.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA LEX' - The welfare of the people is the most important consideration.
Granted 7th March 1966.

The London Borough of Lewisham was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Deptford and Lewisham.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

lewisham lb arms
deptford mb arms
Device formerly used by the Metropolitan Borough of Deptford
lewisham badge
Badge

The background colours of green, purple and black allude to Lee Green, Hither (Heather) Green and Blackheath. The two lions' faces each crowned with a Saxon crown, as in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Lewisham, symbolise the royal and Saxon connections both of Lewisham, where King Alfred was the first Lord of the Manor, and Deptford, where the same King fought the Danes. The golden ship in the base represents the famous Royal Shipbuilding Yard established in Deptford by King Henry VIII in 1513. The reversed pall consisting of wavy bars of blue and silver forms an heraldic map view, representing the meeting point of the rivers Ravensbourne and Quaggy, which was the original settlement point of what is now Lewisham, and then flowing north toward the River Thames.
The two green dolphins represent the close association of the Borough with things nautical and refer also to the dolphins which were the supporters of the unofficial device formerly used by the Metropolitan Borough of Deptford. The silver wings and golden mullet are from the arms of Lord Northbrook, Lord of the Manor of Lee.
The white horse is that of Kent, part of Deptford and nearly the whole of Lewisham having once been in that county and Deptford having used the horse in its old device. The silver stag is derived from one of the supporters of the Earl of Dartmouth, who is also Viscount Lewisham and the Lord of the Manor of Lewisham. The mural crowns are symbols of civic dignity and authority.


MERTON, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Sable a Fret on a Chief Or two Keys in saltire wards upwards and outwards surmounted by a Sword point downwards between a double-headed Eagle displayed Sable armed and legged Gules and a Lion passant Sable armed and langued Gules.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or and in front of three Sprigs of Lavender proper a Fret Or thereon a Cornish Chough proper; Mantled Sable doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister side an Eagle wings addorsed Sable each gorged with a Mural Crown Or.
BADGE: On a Fret Or two Lions counterpassant Sable.

Motto 'STAND FAST IN HONOUR AND STRENGTH'.
Granted 1st January 1965.

The London Borough of Merton was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Mitcham, the Borough of Wimbledon and the Merton and Morden Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

merton lb arms

The fret, like that in the arms of the Merton and Morden UDC, is from the arms of Merton Priory, which was founded by Gilbert the Knight in 1114 for the Augustinians and stood in the centre of the Borough. The black double-headed eagle, a reputed symbol of Julius Caesar, refers to his somewhat doubtful association with Wimbledon through the camp and well which bear his name. This eagle was the main charge in the arms of the Borough of Wimbledon. The crossed keys and sword, like those in the arms of the Borough of Mitcham, are symbols of St. Peter and St. Paul the town's patron saints. The lion is from the arms of Sir Richard Garth, whose family were Lords of the Manor of Morden and local benefactors, and can also be seen in the arms of Merton and Morden UDC.
The mural crown is a symbol of local government and refers to the Council's Borough status. The fret is derived from the shield, but also links with the fret in the arms of Wimbledon, derived from the heraldry of the Spencer family. The chough from the Wimbledon crest is taken from the arms of Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex, who was granted the Manor of Wimbledon by Henry VIII. The sprigs of lavender, from the crest of Mitcham, are a reminder of the former lavender fields hereabouts.
The lion and eagle supporters are derived from the arms, differenced with mural crowns.


NEWHAM, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per fess Gules and Or in chief a Ship in full sail flags flying proper and two Hammers in saltire Or in base three Chevrons Gules over all on a Pale Ermine a Crozier Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Sword point downwards proper pommel and hilt Or and a Crozier of the last in saltire a Sun rising proper.

Motto 'PROGRESS WITH THE PEOPLE'.
Granted to the West Ham County Borough Council 14th January 1887, transferred by Royal Warrant 1st January 1965; exemplified 20th May 1966.

The London Borough of Newham was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of East Ham, the County Borough of West Ham, that part of the Borough of Barking west of the River Roding and that part of the Borough of Woolwich (Kent) north of the River Thames.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

newham lb arms

The ship in full sail represents the Royal Docks, which occupy virtually the whole southern boundary of the borough and the two crossed hammers represent the Thames Ironworks and Railway Works. The amateur football team formed by workers at the Works evolved into the famous West Ham United Football Club, who are still known as the 'Hammers'. The three red chevrons are derived from (with colours reversed) the arms of William de Montfichet, in whom the Manor of Hamme was vested in Norman times. The ermine band with a Bishop's crozier in gold recalls the famous Cistercian Abbey of Stratford Langthome which was sited along the western boundary on the banks of the River Lea.
The motto is an english translation of the old East Ham Motto 'Progressio cum populo'.


REDBRIDGE, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Ermine an Oak Tree eradicated and fructed proper between four Leopard's Faces and three Martlets alternately in orle Or a Base barry wavy Azure and Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of Argent and Azure issuant from a Chaplet of Oak a demi Buck proper supporting a Cross flory Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Benedictine Abbess holding in the exterior hand a Book and supporting a Crozier with Sudarium and on the sinister side a Forester supporting with exterior hand a Bow all proper.
BADGE: On a Mount in front of a Hurst of Trees a Stag trippant proper.

Motto 'IN UNITY PROGRESS'.
Granted 3rd December 1964.

The London Borough of Redbridge was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Ilford, the Borough of Wanstead and Woodford, the northern part of the Borough of Dagenham and part of the Chigwell Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

redbridge lb arms
redbridge badge
Badge

The oak tree, seen in the arms of the Borough of Ilford, recalls the Fairlop Oak in Hainault Forest, under this tree from 1725 until it was blown down in 1820 an annual fair was held. The leopard's faces and martlets, from the arms of the Borough of Wanstead and Woodford, are derived from the arms attributed to Edward the Confessor and King Harold, who gave the Manors of Wanstead and Woodford to the Abbeys of Westminster and Waltham receptively. The blue and white waves represent the River Roding and the water and wells which were a prominent feature of the area.
The buck, from the crest of the Borough of Ilford, represents the Forests of Epping and Hainault which are closely associated with the history of Ilford, Wanstead and Woodford. The cross flory from the arms of Wanstead and Woodford again refers to the overlordship of the Manors of Wanstead and Woodford by the Abbeys of Westminster and Waltham.
The Benedictine Abbess, one of the supporters of the arms of Ilford, represents Adeliza, Abbess of Barking Abbey, and founder of Ilford Chapel and Hospital circa 1145. The forester, again a supporter of the arms of Ilford, is a further reference to Hainault Forest.


RICHMOND, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Ermine a Portcullis chained Or a Bordure Gules charged with eight Fleurs-de-Lys Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules out of a Mural Crown Gules a Swan rousant in the beak a Branch of climbing Red Roses leaved and entwined about the neck proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Griffin Gules armed and beaked Azure each supporting an Oar proper the blade of the dexter Dark Blue and that of the sinister Light Blue.
BADGE: A Rose Or charged with a Portcullis chained Gules.

Granted 7th March 1966.

The London Borough of Richmond was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Barnes, the former Borough of Richmond and the Borough of Twickenham.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

richmond lb arms

The theme which runs through the design is the ancient and intimate royal connections enjoyed by the borough.
The arms are portrayed in the royal colours of ermine, red and gold. As the very name Richmond is derived from King Henry VII's Earldom of Richmond in Yorkshire, the principal charge in the arms, as in the arms of the former Borough of Richmond, is the gold portcullis. This appears to have been King Henry's favourite badge and his chapel in Westminster Abbey is decorated with crowned portcullises and roses. The border of royal red is emblazoned with another royal badge, the fleur-de-lys.
The swan is derived from the crest of the Borough of Twickenham, but instead of swimming on water as formerly, the swan now stands within the mural crown, the time honoured civic symbol and is differenced from other swan crests by the branch of red roses (another royal allusion) which it holds in its beak. The swan symbolises the River Thames whose amenities were enjoyed by all the former boroughs.
The griffins, like those of the Borough of Barnes, allude to the Spencers, Lords of the Manor of Mortlake and these, being also noble creatures symbolise courage, strength and swiftness. The dark and light blades commemorate the fact that the famous University Boat Race ends at Mortlake.
The badge is a combination of the rose and portcullis badge of King Henry VII.


SOUTHWARK, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Gules on a Cross Argent a Well Head between four Cinquefoils Gules on a Chief chequy Or and Vert a Lymphad sail furled Sable and a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure an Oak Tree proper fructed and dimidiating a Garb Or both banded per fess wavy Argent and Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Elizabethan Player habited as for the role of Hamlet holding a Skull in the exterior hand and on the sinister side a Youth habited in early Fifteenth Century dress all proper.

Motto 'UNITED TO SERVE'.
Granted 15th August 1966.

The London Borough of Southwark was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Bermondsey, Camberwell and Southwark.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

southwark lb arms

The cross was suggested by the crosses and quarters in the arms of all three former boroughs. The well and cinquefoils are from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell, where the well was a 'canting' reference to the name Camberwell and the cinquefoils were from the arms of Edward Alleyn, former Lord of the Manor of Dulwich. The gold and green chequers symbolise the Borough's old and new elements. The ship like that in the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Bermondsey refers to that area's maritime associations. The Rose is for St. Mary Newington, the largest of the four parishes amalgamated in 1900 to form the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark.
The half tree and wheatsheaf bound together by a wave, suggest as a whole the importation of timber and food 'from overseas'.
The supporters allude to the area's connections with Shakespeare and Chaucer, two great figures in English literature. The figure on the left is inspired by Hamlet and that on the right by the Esquire in the Canterbury Tales.
The motto is that of the Metropolitan Borough of Southwark.


SUTTON, LONDON BOROUGH OF
Link to LB Sutton Web Site

ARMS: Per chevron Azure and Argent on a Chevron Gules between in chief a Bezant and a Plate each charged with a Key wards upward and outward the dexter Azure the sinister Gules and in base an inescutcheon of the first charged with a representation of an Hannibal Aircraft volant Argent and in base a rising Sun Or a Fountain between two Sprigs of Oak leaved and fructed Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours perched on a Mural Crown Or charged with a Rose Gules thereon another Argent barbed and seeded a Popinjay proper gorged Gules holding in the dexter claw a Cross formy fitchy Sable.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion queue fourché Gules and on the sinister side a Greyhound Sable each gorged with a Mural Crown Or charged with Rose Gules thereon another Argent barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'PER ARDUA IN FIDE SERVITE DEO'-Through Difficulties Serve God in Faith.
Granted 5th April 1966.

The London Borough of Sutton was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Beddington and Wallington, the Borough of Sutton and Cheam and the Carshalton Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

sutton lb arms

The gold and silver roundels and keys, for St. Peter, are taken from the arms of the Borough of Sutton and Cheam and refer to the ownership of 'Sudton' from the time of the Domesday Survey until 1583 by the Abbey of Chertsey, which was dedicated to the aforementioned saint. The small shield with a Hannibal Aircraft, from the arms of the Borough of Beddington and Wallington, refers to the former Croydon Airport, perhaps the most famous in the world before World War II. The red chevron, heraldic fountain and oak sprigs are from the arms of the Carshalton UDC. The chevron is from the heraldry of the Gaynesford and Scawen families and the fountain to the towns springs and pools. The oak sprigs refer to natural amenities, 'The Oaks' estate, formally owned by the Earls of Derby, which lent its name to 'The Oaks Stakes', instituted in 1779 and link to the arms of the Surrey County Council, in whose area the three constituent authorities where situated.
The mural crown, a symbol of civic government, is from the crest of Carshalton UDC and the parrot (or popinjay) is from the crest of the Borough of Sutton and Cheam, derived from the heraldry of the Lumley family, former Lords of the Manor of Cheam. The black cross in its claw is from the arms of the See of Canterbury, which was given 'Cheyham' in 1018.
The red double tailed lion and black greyhound, both from the arms of Carshalton, are from the heraldry of the Burghersh and Gaynesford (or Gainsford) families respectively, holders of the Manor of Stone Court in the time of Edward III and Henry VI.
The motto combines those of the three constituent authorities, Beddington and Wallington- Per ardua ad summa; Through difficulties to the heights, Carshalton-Animo et fide; By courage and faith and Sutton and Cheam-Serve God and be cheerful.


TOWER HAMLETS, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Argent out of a Base wavy Azure thereon two Bars wavy Argent a Lymphad sail furled Sable pennon and flags flying Gules on a Chief Azure between a pair of Fire Tongs and a Weaver's Shuttle a Pale Argent charged with a sprig of Mulberry fructed proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London proper two Anchors in saltire Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Seahorse (Hippocampus) and on the sinister side a Talbot proper.

Motto 'FROM GREAT THIGS TO GREATER'
Granted 1st September 1965.

The London Borough of Tower Hamlets was formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Boroughs of Bethnal Green, Poplar and Stepney.

tower hamlets arms

The arms are basically the same as those of the Metropolitan Borough of Stepney. The ship upon water recalls the marine importance of the area and the tongs are those of St. Dunstan, the Patron Saint of Stepney and of metal workers, and who as Bishop of London held the great Manor of Stepney. The sprig of mulberry and weaver's shuttle refer to the historic aspects of industry and activity within the boundaries of the new Borough.
The representation of the White Tower of the Tower of London, recalls the situation of that historic building within the Borough's boundaries. The crossed anchors, like those in the crest of stepney, repeat the marine allusion of the shield.
The seahorse is often used for places of marine importance and the Talbot dog refers to the Isle of Dogs.
The motto is an English translation of the former Stepney motto.


WALTHAM FOREST, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Vert a Stag's Head caboshed proper between the attires an Ancient Crown Or on a Chief wavy Argent three Oak Trees couped proper fructed Or.
CREST: On a Mural Crown in front of a Cross Staff Or a Lion passant per pale Or and Sable; Mantled Vert doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag gorged with a Wreath of Oak proper pendent therefrom a Billet that on the dexter Gules charged with an Anchor Argent that on the sinister Vert charged with a Sword point upwards Argent hilt and pommel Or.
BADGE: A Stag's Head caboshed proper charged on the forehead with a Cross formy Or and between the attires three Oak Trees two and one as in the Arms.

Motto 'FELLOWSHIP IS LIFE'.
Granted 1st January 1965.

The London Borough of Waltham Forest was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Chingford, the Borough of Leyton and the Borough of Walthamstow.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

waltham forest lb arms
waltham forest badge
Badge

The shield is symbolic of the name Waltham Forest, which revives the name given to the great Forest of Essex in the reign of Henry III. The ancient crown is similar to that of the King, and the stag's head, like that in the arms of the Borough of Chingford, represents the Royal Chase. The wavy division line refers to the River Lea, which forms the Borough's western boundary and was important in the history of the area. Since the Waltham Forest was more extensive than the present Borough, the oak trees are shown couped or cut from the original forest, three in number to represent the three constituent boroughs, namely; Chingford, Leyton and Walthamstow.
The mural crown, seen in the arms of the Boroughs of Chingford and Walthamstow, is a common symbol of civic government. The gold and black lion combines the Withipole's lion from the arms of the Borough of Leyton with the Frauncey's lion from its crest. The Frauncey family held the Manor of Ruckholt and the Withipole family held the Manor of Marks. The cross-staff also from the crest of Leyton is from the arms of Stratford Langthorne Abbey.
The stag on the left is derived from the stag that supported the arms of Walthamstow, which represented the Maynard family, who were connected with the town since the seventeenth century, and in particular to Henry Maynard, whose bequests are noteworthy. The oak leaves and anchor are from the crest and arms of Walthamstow and were derived from the heraldry of George Monoux, who made various benefactions to the town. The stag on the right is derived from the stag's head in the arms of Chingford. The sword, which is a symbol of St. Paul, represents the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's Cathedral, who held the Manor of Chingford St. Pauls from pre-Conquest days until 1544. It also refers to the City of London Corporation, trusties of the Forest, and the green background upon which it rests is derived from the principal colour of the arms of the Heathcote family, who held the Manor of Chingford Comitis.
The motto is the same as that of Walthamstow and it taken from the works of William Morris's Dream of John Bull (1888), he resided for a time in Walthamstow.


WANDSWORTH, LONDON BOROUGH OF

ARMS: Per pale indented Argent and Azure a Fess Chequy Azure and Or each of the last charged with a Goutte Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Ancient Ship at the prow a Dragon's Head Sable four Oars in action and as many Shields Or resting against the bulwarks pennon Flying to the dexter Gules the Sail charged with the Arms of the London Borough of Wandsworth.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Dove wings elevated and addorsed Azure the underside of the wings charged with four Mullets Or in the beak a Sprig of Lavender proper and on the sinister side a Dragon Sable wings elevated and addorsed Argent the underside of the wings charged with four Crosses couped Gules.
BADGE: A Fountain charged with a Crown Palisado Or.

Motto 'WE SERVE'.
Granted 1st March 1965 .

The London Borough of Wandsworth formed by the amalgamation of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea and most of the Metropolitan Borough of Wandsworth.

wandsworth lb arms
wandsworth badge
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The silver and blue halves of the shield divided by the indented line are taken from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Battersea. The blue and gold checked fess with blue drops are taken from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Wandsworth. The checks are represent the arms of William de Warren created first Earl of Surrey by William Rufus. Each gold square bears a tear drop repre­senting the tears of the French Huguenots many of whom settled in Wandsworth in 1685.
The ancient ship with its dragon's head prow points to some notable expedition by sea which is credited with having sailed up the Thames as far as Putney. It may refer to the Wendels a tribe of sea raiders from the continent credited with having given their name to the district, for Wendelsworth was an early variation of Wandsworth. The four shields and oars on the ship represent the four Parishes of which the borough is composed — Battersea, Putney, Tooting and Wandsworth.
The dove is derived from the former Battersea crest, the spreading wings bearing four stars or mullets again refer to the four parishes. The mullets were seen in the fromer Battersea arms, and were taken from the heraldry of the St. John family, who had a mansion on the bank of the river. The sprig of lavender alludes to the lavender fields in Battersea which gave the name to one of the borough's principal thorough­fares. The black dragon was derived from the Wandsworth ship and also refers to London, being similar to the supporters on the City of London arms. Its wings bear four red crosses again representing the four parishes. The crosses were seen in the former Wandsworth arms, where they recall those in the arms of the City and County of London.
The badge has a dual meaning, firstly the crown palisado is a heraldic device to represent a place or "worth" as in Wandsworth and the background to the device refers to the Borough's situation on the River Thames.


WESTMINSTER CITY COUNCIL
Link to City of Westminster Web Site

ARMS: Azure between two Wolves' Heads erased argent and on a Base wavy Argent and Azure a female Figure affrontée vested and mantled and on her sinister arm a Child also vested around the head of each a Halo all Or on a Chief of the last a Pallet Azure thereon a Cross flory between five Martlets Or being the Arms of King Edward the Confessor between two united Roses Argent upon Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a Portcullis Sable studded and chained Or between on the dexter side a united Rose the flower Argent upon Gules and on the sinister side a Lily both stalked leaved and erect proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Ermine the dexter gorged of a Mural Crown Azure charged with three Lily Flowers Argent the sinister gorged of a like Crown Or charged with two Swords in saltire Gules.
BADGE: A Portcullis chained and ensigned of a Mural Crown between on the dexter side a united Rose and on the sinister side a Lily both stalked and leaved all Or.

Motto 'CUSTODI CIVITATEM DOMINE' - Guard the City, O Lord.
Arms, crest and supporters granted 2nd September 1964. Badge granted 1st March 1965.

The City of Westminster was formed by the amalgamation of the former City of Westminster, the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington and the Metropolitan Borough of St. Marylebone.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

westminster city arms
westminster badge
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The figure of St. Mary and child is taken from the crest of the Metropolitan Borough of St. Marylebone, where it refered to the dedication of an ancient chapel, from which the Borough derived its name. The wolves' heads are from the arms of the Metropolitan Borough of Paddington, and are taken from the arms of the first Mayor of that Borough. The upper part of the shield is the same as that of the former City of Westminster, the cross surrounded by martlets, which is the device of King Edward the Confessor, the first English King to live in Westminster, and is the device of Westminster Abbey. The red and white roses on either side of the cross represent the union of the English royal houses of Lancaster and York.
The rose and portcullis are Tudor and Beaufort badges, the portcullis is also associated with Parliament. The lily again refers to St.Mary.
The ermine lions, like those of the former City, are from the heraldry of the Cecil family, for centuries associated with Westminster. Sir William Cecil was the City's first Lord High Steward and his descendant , the Marquess of Salisbury, held the same of at the time the supporters were granted to the former City.


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