MIDDLESEX COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules three Seaxes fessewise in pale proper pommelled and hilted Or points to the sinister and cutting edge upwards in chief a Saxon Crown of the last.

Granted 7th November 1910.

middlesex cc

Middlesex, like Essex, formerly used the arms assigned by the medieval heralds to the ancient kingdom of the middle and east Saxons. When Middlesex County Council were granted arms the seaxes were incorporated in them, together with a Saxon crown to distinguish them from the former arms, which were granted to the Essex County Council.


ACTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Gules an Oak Tree issuant from a Mount in base proper on a Chief Or between to the dexter an open Book and the sinister a Cog-Wheel both proper a Pale of the first charged with three Seaxes fessewise in pale proper pommelled and hilted Or points to the sinister and cutting edge upwards in chief a Saxon Crown of the last.
*CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or a Sprig of Oak fructed proper.

Motto 'FLOREAT ACTONA' - May Acton flourish.
Granted 15th November 1921.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Ealing in 1965.

acton bc arms

The oak in the arms and crest has reference to the name Acton - meaning 'oak town'. The book represents education and the cog-wheel the motor industry.


BRENTFORD AND CHISWICK BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per saltire Argent and Gules in chief a representation of St. Nicholas proper in base two Bars wavy Azure and in fesse as many Seaxes the cutting edges inwards proper Pomels and Hilts Or.
CREST: Issuant out of a Saxon Crown Or a Phoenix Sable in Flames proper.
SUPPORTERS On either side a Griffin Or gorged with a Collar gemel wavy Azure.

Motto 'FIRMIOR' - Stronger.
Granted 1st September 1932.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hounslow in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia. Additional information supplied by Bryan Betts, Brentford.

brentford and chiswick bc arms

The arms incorporate the emblems which appeared on the seal of the former UDC, which displayed the figures of St. Nicholas in reference to the dedication of the parish church, together with three seaxes from the arms of the County Council. The blue waves, like those on the supporters, represent the River Brent and the Borough's situation beside the River Thames.
The phoenix represents the new Borough rising from the ashes of the old Urban District.
It has been suggested that the griffins may refer to the Fuller Smith & Turner's Griffin Brewery, one of the biggest landmarks in Chiswick. In addition the Brentford FC ground is Griffin Park, which is named after the former, as Fuller's owns the freehold of the football ground.


EALING BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Per chevron Gules and Argent in dexter chief two Swords in saltire and in sinister chief three Seaxes fessewise in pale proper all with pommels and hilts Or and in base an Oak Tree eradicated also proper.

Motto 'RESPICE PROSPICE' - Look backward, look forward.
Granted 22nd February 1902.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Ealing in 1965.

ealing bc arms

The crossed swords of St. Paul are from the arms of the See of London, to which the Manor of Ealing formerly belonged. The seaxes are from the arms of the Middlesex CC and the tree is said to be a sign that Ealing is 'growing and flourishing'.


EDMONTON BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale wavy Sable and Azure on a Saltire Or between two Cog Wheels in fesse Argent an open Book proper bound Gules edged Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure issuant from Flames of Fire proper a demi-Lion per bend sinister Sable and Or holding in the dexter paw a Sledge Hammer also proper and resting the sinister paw upon a Ciquefoil Gules.
SUPPORTERS On either side a Lion Gules gorged with a Collar engrailed with the Chain reflexed over the back and charged on the shoulder with a Saltire couped Or supporting a Staff Gold flying therefrom a Banner the dexter Azure charged with an Oak Tree eradicated and fructed proper and the sinister Gules charged with two Seaxes in saltire Argent pomelled and hilted Or.

Motto 'FAITH IN INDUSTRY'.
Granted 2nd October 1937.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Enfield in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

edmonton bc arms

The black and blue background represents the division of the ancient parish of Edmonton, the western portion being the district of Southgate. The saltire refers to the Abbey of St. Albans which held the Manor of Edmonton and the book alludes to the Borough's literary associations, especially with Lamb and Keats.
The lion is from the arms of the old local family of Francis, while the cinquefoil stands for the family of Charlton, sometime Lords of the Manor. The lion holds a sledge-hammer symbolizing the vigour of Edmonton's industries, to which the cog-wheels also refer. The flames allude in particular to the gas industry.
The supporting lions are taken to typify courage and determination. One banner alludes to the ancient forests of the neighbourhood, and the other contains the seaxes from the arms of the Middlesex County Council. The saltires repeat that on the shield.


ENFIELD BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Or an Enfield rampant Gules on a Chief Vert a Bar wavy Argent thereon a like Bar Azure.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules a Stag trippant Or holding in the mouth a Rose Gules seeded barbed leaved and stalked proper.
SUPPORTERS On the dexter side an Enfield and on the sinister side a Stag Or.

Motto 'PRIORA COLE MELIORA SEQUERE' - Cherish the past but strive after even better things in the future.
Arms and crest granted 20th September 1946, to the Urban District Council. Supporters granted 26th October 1955.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Enfield in 1965.

enfield bc arms

The principal charge is a mythological heraldic creature, known as an "Enfield", which has the head of a fox, the chest of a hound, the talons of an eagle, the body of a lion and the hindquarters and tail of a wolf. It was chosen to suggest the name of the town. The green chief with silver and blue wavy bars represent the Borough's connection with the New River, the Green Belt areas and open spaces.
The stag refers to Enfield Chase, a former Royal hunting ground and the red rose to the district's association with the Duchy of Lancaster.
The supporters were granted in 1955 when the Urban District was granted Borough status, and are derived from the arms and crest.


FELTHAM URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fesse wavy Argent and Azure in chief two Palets Sable between a Tudor Rose stalked slipped and leaved proper and a Peacock in his pride Vert and in base in front of two Wings conjoined of the first a Sword erect Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within a Chaplet of Hawthorn fructed proper a Mount of Pellets thereon an Eagle wings expanded Or.

Granted 19th June 1945
Motto 'IN UNITATEM COEAMUS' - Let us go forward together.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hounslow in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

feltham UDC arms

The wavy line and the silver and blue field indicate the Duke of Northumberland's River which takes the head-waters of the River Colne to Syon House, and the Longford River (also called the Queen's or Cardinal's River) which takes the Colne Waters to serve, the fountain and lakes of Hampton Court. The two black palets represent railway lines and indicate Feltham's importance in the southern portion of the British Railways system. The rose stands for the Tudor associations of Hanworth, particularly the claim that Elizabeth I spent much of her early childhood at Hanworth Manor. The peacock represents the topiary peacocks in the grounds of St Mary's Church, Bedfont, which are accepted as local emblems. The winged sword stands for the London Airport and the district's close association with the aircraft industry. The sword also refers to the Royal Army Ordnance Depot, and to the ancient sword-mill marked on a 17th century map.
The gunstones also allude to the R.A.O.C. Depot, and to the powder mills which formerly existed in the Crane Valley. The hawthorn refers to the Spelthorne Hundred, and the eagle is a reference not only of air traffic, but also of the old Roman road to the west which passed through the district.


FINCHLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert on a Chevron raguly between in chief two Bugle Horns stringed Or and in base a Mitre Argent garnished Gold a Rose Gules surmounted by another Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert a Finch proper resting the dexter claw on an Escutcheon Or changed with a Fleur-de-Lys Gules.
SUPPORTERS On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister side a Stag proper each gorged with a Collar suspended therefrom a Bugle Horn ensigned with a Ducal Coronet Or.

Motto 'REGNANT QUI SERVIUNT' - They rule who serve.
Granted 10th July 1933.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Barnet in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

finchley bc arms

The green background and ragged chevron recall the oak woods for which Finchley was formerly famous. The horns and stags refer to the hunting-ground of the Tudor Monarchs, represented by the double rose. The mitre represent the Bishops of London, who owned land in the District.
The finch and "lys" are a heranldic pun on the name.
The lion is part of the arms of the Countess of Pembroke, a progentitor of the Comptons, who held the Manor of Finchley.


FRIERN BARNET URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

*ARMS: Vert a pale Argent on a chief dancetty of three points downward three fleurs-de-lis Azure.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Vert a Stag's Head caboshed Gules attired Or between the antlers a Cross potent quadrate Argent.

Granted 10th August 1938
Motto 'RURIS AMATOR' - Lover of the country.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hounslow in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

friern barnet UDC

The white pale on the green background represents the Great North Road running between grassy borders. The fleurs-de-lis recall the district's royal associations in Elizabethan times.
The stag's head refers to the forest land ajoining Enfield Chase and the cross stands for the Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, with whom the priory was connected.


HAYES AND HARLINGTON URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Pall couped at the base Argent between in chief two Wings conjoined in base of the last and in fesse as many Cog-Wheels proper in front of two Rays of Lightning in saltire Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Circlet of Brushwood a demi-Stag supporting a Seax point upwards proper pommel and hilt Or enfiled with a Saxon Crown Gold.

Motto 'FORWARD'.
Granted 12th October 1950.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hillingdon in 1965.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hayes and harlington lb arms

The green field refers to the district's agricultural background and the amenities of the Green Belt. The silver pall is derived from that in the arms of the See of Canterbury. In 790 King Offa granted lands in Hayes to the Archbishop of Canterbury, and for more than seven centuries the place was closely associated with the See. Among the Archbishops who sometimes resided at Hayes was Anselm, who is commemorated by St. Anselm's Church. The limbs of the pall also suggest runways and together with the wings refer to London Airport. The cog-wheels refer to industry in general and the lightning flashes to the electrical industries in particular.
The circlet of brushwood and deer refer to the name 'Hayes' which is derived from 'Hesa', which was a brushwood enclosure used as a trap for deer. The Seax is from the arms of Middlesex CC and the Saxon crown refers to the fact that in that period parts of the district were royal property.


HENDON BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Azure on a Mount in base Vert a Pascal Lamb proper on a Chief Or two Windmill Sails in saltire Sable.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a two bladed Airscrew in pale winged Or.
*SUPPORTERS On the dexter a Griffin Argent gorged with a Mural Crown Gules and charged on the shoulder with a Mullet Sable and on the sinister a Pegasus Argent gorged with a Mural Crown Gules and charged on the shoulder with an Eagle displayed Sable.

Motto 'ENDEAVOUR'.
Granted 24th September 1932.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hounslow in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

hendon bc arms

The shield incorporates elements symbolic of the three original wards constituted in 1879. The Lamb represents Central Hendon, and was used by the Hendon UDC and its predecessor, the Local Board. The hill upon which it stands refers to Child's Hill and the windmill sails to Mill Hill.
The winged air-screw indicates Hendon's association with aviation.
The griffin is a variation of the supporter of Lord Powis, at one time Lord of the Manor of Hendon. The pegasus and eagle are derived from the heraldry of a former Duke of Buckingham and Chandos who owned property in the West Hendon area.


HESTON AND ISLEWORTH BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Tierced in pairle Azure Sable and Gules in chief two Wings conjoined Argent to the dexter a Cross bottonee Or and to the sinister a Lion rampant guardant per fesse of the last and or the fourth.

Motto 'UNITATE FORTIOR' - Stronger by union.
Granted 16th April 1932.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hounslow in 1965.

heston and isleworth bc arms

The silver wings on blue refer to Heston Airport. The gold cross bottony is from the seal of the Monastery of St. Saviour and St. Brigit of Syon, founded in 1416 at Twickenham by Henry V and moved to the site on which Syon House now stands circa 1431. The gold and silver lion is from the arms of Hounslow Priory, founded in the thirteenth century by the Trinitarian Brothers of Redemption, on the site now occupied by Holy Trinity Church.
The motto refers to the union of the two formerly seperate parishes of Heston and Isleworth.


HORNSEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Argent and Gules in chief two Oak Trees eradicated and in base two Swords in saltire proper the latter pommelled and hilted Or.

Motto 'FORTIOR QUO PARATIOR' - The stronger because the more prepared.
Granted 17th March 1904.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Haringey in 1965.

hornsey bc arms

The oak tree are symbolic of Hornsey's former state as part of the old forest of Middlesex, while the crossed swords of St. Paul are from the arms of the See of London with which Hornsey was connected.


RUISLIP-NORTHWOOD URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent on a Mount in base Vert a Hurst of Oak Trees fructed proper in chief a Hurt charged with a Mullet Or a Chief Gules thereon a Mitre of the first between two Fleurs-de-Lys of the third.
CREST: On a Wreath or the Colours in front of two Ears of Rye slipped in saltire proper a Boar passant Sable armed and unguled.

Motto 'NON PROGREDI EST REGREDI' - Not to go forward is to go backward.
Granted 22nd June 1937.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hillingdon in 1965.

ruislip-northwood udc

The hurst of trees with a representation of the Pole Star above are a play on the name Northwood. The mitre and fleurs-de-lys refer to the Abbey of Bec Herlewin in Normandy, to whom the Lordship of Ruislip was granted, where there was a cell of the Order. The Manor was later seized by Henry V and granted as part of the endowment of King's College, Cambridge. The Abbey and the College were dedicated to St. Mary, one of whose symbols is a fleur-de-lys.
The 'rye slips' are a play on the name Ruislip. The wild boar shows that the Lordship was an ancient one, granted when the land was forest roamed by wild boars.


SOUTHALL BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fesse Or and Vert two Thorn Trees in pale that in chief proper and that in base of the first between two Pallets wavy Argent each charged with a like Pallet Azure.
CREST: Out of a a Mural Crown two Torches inflamed in saltire enfiled with a Wreath of Wheat-ears all proper; Mantled Vert doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS On the dexter side a Griffin Gules and on the sinister side a Pegasus Argent crined queued and unguled Azure each gorged with a Saxon Crown and charged on the shoulder with a Garb Or.

Motto 'FOR ALL'.
Granted 23rd September 1936.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Ealing in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

southall bc arms

The thorn trees allude to the old Spelthorne Hundred and the 'south holt' and the 'north wood' commemorated in the name Southall-Norwood, which was borne by the former Urban District. The blue and white waves represent the local streams.
The wheat alludes to the local food producing industries and the torches to the gas and electricity industries.
The griffin is the emblems of the London Passenger Transport Board, indicating that London's omnibuses are made in Southall, and the motto translated into Latin, hints at the same fact. The pegasus represents both the canals that pass through Southall and the areodromes in its vicinity. The Saxon Crowns are from the arms of the County.


SOUTHGATE BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Azure issuant from the base a Sun in splendour on a Chief Or a four-barred Gate of the first .
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Oak Tree fructed proper pendent therefrom a Bugle-Horn and a Quiver of Arrows Or.
*SUPPORTERS On either side a Stag each gorged with a Chaplet of Oak proper pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Or charged with a Rose Gules.

Motto 'EX GLANDE QUERCUS' - From the acorn, the oak.
Granted 15th September 1933.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Enfield in 1965.

southgate bc arms

The emblems on the shield combine in reference to the name of the place.
The oak and stags recall the former oak forests of the area anf the red rosesindicate that Southgate was in the Duchy of Lancaster.


TOTTENHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules a Saltire couped Or on a Chief indented of the last a Helm Sable between two Billets Azure each charged with an Estoile of the second.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or a demi Lion Gules supporting a Seax Argent pomelled and hilted Gold.
SUPPORTERS On either side a Lion reguardant Gules gorged with a Mural Crown pendant therefrom by a Chain Or a Roundel the dexter Ermine and the sinister Gold charged with a Maunch also Gules.

Motto 'DO WELL AND DOUBT NOT'.
Granted 13th September 1934.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Haringey in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

tottenham bc arms

The Manor of Tottenham, held by Earl Waltheof before the Norman Conquest, passed by his daughter's marriage to David, Earl of Huntingdon, son of King Macolm III of Scotland, and descended to William the Lion, King of Scotland. This connection with the realm of Scotland is indicated by the red lions. The Manor was next granted to William the Lion's brother, and was eventually divided between three co-heirs, Robert de Bruce, John de Baliol, and Henry de Hastings. These are represented in the arms - Bruce by the saltire and chief, Baliol by the ermine, and Hastings by the maunch or sleeve. The stars, placed on billets (representing tiles or bricks), are from the arms of Sarah, Duchess of Somerset, founder of Tottenham Grammar School, and the helm is from those of Compton, Lord of the Manor in the sixteenth century. The crest is identical with that borne by the former Urban District Council above a shield bearing crossed swords and a hurst of seven elm-trees (the 'seven sisters'), with the motto, 'Steadfast in difficulties'.


TWICKENHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent a Pall Vert between in chief an Antique Lamp fired proper on the dexter side two Swords in saltire also proper pommelled and hilted Or and on the sinister side three Roses two and one Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon Waves of Water a Swan holding in the beak an Eel all proper.

Motto 'LOOKING BACKWARD LOOKING FORWARD'.
Granted 30th October 1913 to Urban District Council.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Richmond in 1965.

Picture thanks to David Hale, NSW, Australia.

twickenham bc arms

The pall not only symbolizes the name of Twickenham ('the place where the two ways meet'), but also indicates the close historical connection with the See of Canterbury, on the arms of which the same charge appears. The lamp stands for Twickenham's interest in literature, the arts and the sciences, to all of which the town has given distinguished men, such as - Bacon, Dickens, Tennyson, Pope, Horace Walpole and Turner. The crossed swords, taken from the arms of the See of London, refer to the earliest historical record of Twickenham, namely of land here being granted to Waldhere, Bishop of London, in 704. The three red roses are from the arms of our great educational pioneer, William of Wykeham who built the tower of St Mary's Parish Church.
The waves refer, of course, to the River Thames which bounds the town for a distance of three miles, and the swan suggests the beautiful and tranquil character of the river hereabouts. The eel combines humour and history, for it signifies not only the old lamprey fishing industry of Twickenham but also the famous Eel Pie Island in the river opposite the gardens of York House.


UXBRIDGE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Or on a Pile Gules between two Fountains an Eagle displayed of the field.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Circlet composed of four Chrysanthemums stalked and leaved proper a demi-Lion Gules supporting a Seax blade upwards proper pommel and hilt Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Heraldic Tiger Or and on the sinister side a Pegasus Argent hoofed and crined Azure both gorged with an Astral Crown Vert and pendent therefrom a Plate fimbriated also Vert the dexter plate charged with a Garb proper and the sinister with a Cross throughout Gules.

Arms and crest granted (to UDC) 18th May 1948, supporters granted 10th November 1955.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hillingdon in 1965.

uxbridge bc

The pile is from the arms of the ancient Basset family and the heraldic fountains refer to the district's rivers. The eagle is from the arms of the Paget family, Earls of Uxbridge, a title now borne by the Marquess of Anglesey; and also alludes to Uxbridge RAF Depot and Northolt Airport.
The Chrysanthemums refer to the horicultural industry, the nurseries of the town specialize in these flowers. The national lion holds a seax from the arms of the Middlesex CC.
The tiger is from the arms of the Marquess of Anglesey and the pegasus further represents Uxbridge's connection with the RAF. The green astral crowns refer to the Green Belt, the wheafsheaf to brewing, corn growing and the corn merchant industry. The red cross from the arms of the City of London refers to Greater London.


WEMBLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Vert two Seaxes in saltire points upward enfiled through a Saxon Crown Or.
*CREST: Issuant from a Saxon Crown Or a Mount Vert thereon a Lion statant guardant Gold; Mantled Vert doubled Or.
*SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion guardant Or supporting a Staff Gules flying therefrom a Banner Vert that to the dexter charged with a Pair of Scales and that to the sinister with a Cornucopia replenished Or.

Motto 'TEMPORI PARENDUM' - We must move with the times.
Granted 25th January 1938.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Brent in 1965.

wembley bc arms

The green shield sybolises the open spaces of the Borough, and the crown and seaxes, from the arms of the Middlesex CC, refer to the Saxon origins of the district.
The lions recall John Lyon, founder of Harrow Scool, whose home was at Preston Manor, Wembley. He established a trust, of which the Borough became beneficiary, for the maintenance of Harrow Road and Edgware Road, parts of which are within the Borough boundaries. The balance refers to the Hundred Moot of Gore, and the cornucopia symbolises prosperity.


WILLESDEN BOROUGH COUNCIL

*ARMS: Gules a Chevron between in dexter chief an Orb ensigned with a Cross-crosslet Or and in sinister chief and two Swords in saltire proper hilts and pomels Or and in base three Lilies in a Pot all within a Bordure also Or charged with eight Pellets.
*CREST: Issuant from a Saxon Crown two Wings Or each charged with a Cinquefoil Gules.
*SUPPORTERS: On either side a Dragon Azure gorged with a Saxon Crown Or and charged on the shoulder with two Seaxes in saltire proper hilts and pomels Or.

Motto 'LABORARE EST ORARE' - To work is to pray.
Granted 1933.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Brent in 1965.

willesden bc arms

The orb is the emblem attributed to King Athelstan who, about the middle of the tenth century, granted the Manors of Neasden-cum-Willesden to the Monastery of St Arkenwold, while the eight black roundels indicate the eight Saxon manors into which Willesden was divided. The crossed swords are from the arms of the See of London, the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's having held the manor at the time of the Domesday Survey. The lilies are the emblems of St Mary, the patron saint.
The wings are taken from the crest of Archbishop Bancroft, whose family formerly occupied the Manor of Mapesbury, and the cinqueloils are from the arms of All Souls College, Oxford, which owns much land in Willesden.
The Saxon crowns and the seaxes on the dragons derive from the arms of the Middlesex CC, and represent the ancient Kingdom of the Middle Saxons.


WOOD GREEN BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Or on a Fesse Azure between three Yew Trees eradicated proper a Barrulet Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side an Archer in Chain Armour holding in the exterior hand a Bow proper.

Motto 'NOSTRUM VIRET ROBUR' - Wood Green flourishes or Our strength is as a green tree.
Granted 1st August 1933.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Haringey in 1965.

wood green bc arms

The bands of blue and silver represent the New River Cutting and the yew trees and archers symbolize the original Wood Green Common upon which our forebears practised the ancient sport of archery.


YIEWSLEY AND WEST DRAYTON URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron enarched Or and Vert in chief two Cartwheels Sable and in base an Eagle displayed Argent a Chief Gules thereon on a Mount Vert a representation of the Gatehouse at West Drayton proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours between two Eagle's Wings Or charged with a Cross Gules a Tudor Rose proper.

Motto 'WE SERVE'.
Granted 20th May 1953.

Incorporated into the London Borough of Hillingdon in 1965.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

yiewsley and west drayton arms

The eagle is from the arms of the Paget family. The Manor of West Drayton was held by William Paget, a famous ambassador and courtier of Henry VIII and Edward VI. The family subsequently held the Manors of Dawley and Harmondsworth. The chief shows a representation of the Gatehouse at West Drayton, this is all that remains of the Paget's great house. It was demolished in 1750 and was used as a badge by the Council before the arms were granted. The cartwheels symbolise the traffic along the Bath Road.
The two eagle's wings with crosses of St. George symbolise the arrival of Queen Elizabeth II at London Airport by air, where she first set foot on British soil after her accession. The Tudor rose represents the connection of the Paget family with the Tudor monarchs.


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