WEALD AND DOWNS AREA
The Weald and Downs Area is formed from the four most south-easterly counties of the South East Government Office Region. I have named it after the Weald and the North and South Downs.
It includes the historic counties of Kent, Surrey and Sussex.
In terms of administrative counties it includes Kent, Surrey, East Sussex and West Sussex.
In terms of ceremonial counties is includes Kent, Surrey, East Sussex and West Sussex.

  1. Spelthorne Surrey
  2. Runnymede Surrey
  3. Elmbridge Surrey
  4. Epsom and Ewell Surrey
  5. Surrey Heath Surrey
  6. Woking Surrey
  7. Guildford Surrey
  8. Waverley Surrey
  9. Mole Valley Surrey
  10. Reigate and Banstead Surrey
  11. Tandridge Surrey
  12. Dartford Kent
  13. Gravesham Kent
  14. Medway UA Kent
  15. Sevenoaks Kent (no arms)
  16. Tonbridge and Malling Kent
  17. Swale Kent
  18. Maidstone Kent
  19. Tunbridge Wells Kent
  20. Canterbury Kent
  21. Ashford Kent
  22. Thanet Kent (no arms)
  23. Dover Kent
  24. Shepway Kent
  25. Chichester West Sussex (no arms)
  26. Horsham West Sussex
  27. Arun West Sussex
  28. Worthing West Sussex
  29. Adur West Sussex (no arms)
  30. Brighton and Hove UA East Sussex
  31. Crawley West Sussex
  32. Mid Sussex West Sussex
  33. Lewes East Sussex
  34. Wealden East Sussex
  35. Rother East Sussex (no arms)
  36. Eastbourne East Sussex
  37. Hastings East Sussex
weald and downs map (current)

EAST SUSSEX COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules six Martlets three two one Or a Barrulet wavy enhanced Argent in chief a Saxon Crown Or.

Granted 29th August 1975.

east sussex cc arms

The arms are based on those granted to the previous East Sussex CC on 10th September 1937. In 1974 the County Boroughs of Brighton, Eastbourne and Hastings were added to the county and part transferred to West Sussex. The white wavy bar was added for difference to reflect the changes, as any change of area or population by 10% meant that the arms of a predecessor meant the arms could no longer be used.
The medieval heralds assigned arms consisting of six gold martlets on blue to the ancient Kingdom of the South Saxons. The martlet is a mythical bird, an heraldic generalization for various kinds of birds, but in this case probably represents the swallow. It is shown at rest, with its wings closed and without feet. This last characteristic led to stories about the martlet or swallow spending its entire life in flight, unable to land on the ground!
One theory is that martlets were used because of the influence of the Lords of Arundel in county affairs; in French swallow is hirondelle, having been suggestive of the name of Arundel, the Honour which formed a large part of Sussex. Another possibility is that a number of early Sussex families used martlets on their arms and that a sheriff of Sussex from one of these families simply transferred them from his personal coat of arms to his official seal for county business. Blue and red shields with six golden martlets were already shown representing Sussex in 1611.
The gold crown represents the South Saxons and the red background provides a contrast to the blue background of the similat West Sussex CC arms granted in 1889.


KENT COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules a Horse forcene Argent.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown proper three Masts rigged with courses set and topsails furled proper flying from each masthead a Pennon Argent charged with a Cross Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Sea Lion or gorged with a Collar Gules pendent there from an Escutcheon the dexter of the Arms of the See of Canterbury and the sinister of the Arms of the Cinque Ports.

Motto 'INVICTA' - Unconquered.
Granted 17th October 1933.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

kent cc arms

The white horse on a red field is reputed to be the symbol of the ancient Saxon kingdom of Kent; they have for long been associated with the modern County.
The mural crown commemorates the fact that, for four hundred years, Kent was an independent Saxon kingdom. Its form is also symbolic of the many fortified castles and towns in the county and the masts and sails are emblems of its intimate links with the Navy, the Mercantile Marine and Sea Fisheries.
The sea lions are symbolic of the support that Kentish seaman have given to the sea-power of England through the centuries and the fact that the long coastline of Kent is part of England’s frontier with continental Europe. From the collar of one sea lion is suspended a shield bearing the Arms of the Cinque Ports, which had an obligation to provide substantial support for the naval forces of England until modern times. Four of the Cinque Ports are in Kent. From the collar of the other sea lion is suspended a shield bearing the Arms of the Archbishopric of Canterbury, founded by St Augustine who landed in Kent in AD 597. Canterbury is the primary See of the English Church.
The long serving motto is an allusion to the belief that Kent has kept its boundaries intact since pre-Roman times and that its people had "reserved to themselves and their posterity, their ancient Customs and Liberties" (Richard Kilburn 1659). The motto is on a ribbon the colour of which is as near as possible to the time - honoured Kentish Grey, a colour of significance in the days of the weaving industry in Kent.


SURREY COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Azure and Sable two Keys in bend wards upwards and outwards bows interlaced Or between in dexter base a Woolpack and in sinister chief a Sprig of Oak fructed Argent.
BADGE: On a Roundel per pale Azure and Sable in chief a Sprig of Oak fructed Argent and in base two Keys [in saltire] wards upwards and outwards Or.

Granted 1974.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

surrey cc arms
surrey badge
Badge

The current arms replaced those granted in 1934, since the changes in local government in 1965 and 1974 meant the area and population of the County had altered greatly since the original grant. The main colours of the field are the same as those of the former arms, where the blue, and also the gold parts, are derived from the arms of the Warrennes, ancient Earls of Surrey. The black is suggested by the fields of the arms of the Borough's of Guildford and Godalming. The keys are from the arms of the Abbey of St. Peter at Chertsey, once a powerful and extensive landowner in Surrey. Keys also appear in the arms of the See of Winchester, which formerly included much of the County, they also form part of the arms of the present See of Guildford. The sprig of oak also from the former arms, represents the County's extensive rural areas and is derived from the badge of the FitzAlans, one time Earls of Surrey. It also appears in the mouths of the supporters of the Duke of Norfolk, the current Earl of Surrey. The woolpack is a reminder of the importance of the wool trade in the past, and is also included for that reason in the arms of numerous towns and boroughs in the County.


WEST SUSSEX COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure six Martlets three two and one and a Chief indented Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Sprig of Oak proper fructed with two Acorns Or within a Saxon Crown also Or.

Granted 1974?

west sussex cc arms

The medieval heralds assigned arms consisting of six gold martlets on blue to the ancient Kingdom of the South Saxons. The martlet is a mythical bird, an heraldic generalization for various kinds of birds, but in this case probably represents the swallow. It is shown at rest, with its wings closed and without feet. This last characteristic led to stories about the martlet or swallow spending its entire life in flight, unable to land on the ground!
One theory is that martlets were used because of the influence of the Lords of Arundel in county affairs; in French swallow is hirondelle, having been suggestive of the name of Arundel, the Honour which formed a large part of Sussex. Another possibility is that a number of early Sussex families used martlets on their arms and that a sheriff of Sussex from one of these families simply transferred them from his personal coat of arms to his official seal for county business. Blue and red shields with six golden martlets were already shown representing Sussex in 1611.
Similar arms, but with a straight edge, had been granted to the former County Council in 1889. However in 1974 West Sussex was enlarged by the addition of parts of East Sussex and Surrey. As a result the enlarged County Council sought a new coat of arms.
The Saxon crown is taken from the arms of East Sussex CC, and an allusion to the ancient Kingdom of the South Saxons. The oak leaves and acorns are taken from the arms of Surrey CC and were added to represent the newly-acquired areas. The original straight edge to the gold chief was made into a jagged, tooth-like edge with five indents. These represented the five districts, or parts of districts, which were formerly part of East Sussex and Surrey - Burgess Hill, Cuckfield, East Grinstead, Dorking and Horley. Later Dorking and Horley transferred back to Surrey leaving only Gatwick Airport from Surrey in West Sussex.


ARUN DISTRICT COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent two Bars wavy Azure overall in pale a Key ward uppermost and to the dexter Or on a Chief embattled Vert five Martlets Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure within a Saxon Crown Or a round Tower proper; Mantled Azure and Vert doubled Or.

Granted ?

The Arun District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Arundel, the Bognor Regis Urban District, the Littlehampton Urban District, part of the Chichester Rural District and part of the Worthing Rural District.

arun dc arms

The white background with two wavy blue bars represents the sea and Sussex coastline, and the gold key symbolises authority. The embattled green chief, as in the arms of the Borough of Arundel, resembles the battlements of a tower or castle, and as such are allusive not only of Arundel Castle, a prominent feature in the neighbourhood, but of local government in general. The martlets recall those in these arms of the County, Bognor Regis UDC and Littlehampton UDC, and being known in French as 'hirondelle', they allude by a play on words, to Arundel, the historic town on the River Arun, from which the District Council takes its name. They are five in number, to represent the five former amalgamated areas.
The Saxon crown recalls the history of the area and county prior to the Conquest. The round tower is again, a symbol of local government, a tower, like one of those of Arundel Castle, has been depicted arising from within the Saxon Crown, thereby forming with the latter a simple but very distinctive device which links past and present.


ASHFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Or three Ash Leaves couped two and one each of five leaflets proper on a Chief wavy Vert a Lion passant guardant Or dimidiating the Hull of an Ancient Ship argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a demi Horse Argent holding in the mouth a Hop Cone slipped and leaved and resting the sinister forehoof on a Locomotive Driving Wheel proper.

Motto 'WITH STRONGER FAITH'.
Granted 20th October 1975.

The Borough of Ashford was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Tenterden, the Ashford Urban District, the East Ashford Rural District, the Tenterden Rural District and the West Ashford Rural District.

ashford bc arms

The gold background suggests the richness and fertility of the "Garden of England", and the three sprigs of ash represent the three former Ashford areas. Each sprig has five leaves to indicate the five former authorities comprising the present Borough, and the wavy line suggesting the rivers Stour, Rother and Beult. The lion joined to the hulk of a medieval ship is from the ancient arms of the Cinque Ports, and is taken from the sail of the ship in the arms of the Borough of Tenterden. It indicates the historical importance of Tenterden as a member of the Confederation, and its green background suggests the Tenterden Rural District surrounding the former Borough.
The white and red of the wreath, are the colours of the Kent County Council arms, and of the device of the Ashford UDC, red also being the background of the Tenterden arms. The white horse is that of Kent, and was seen in the device of the Ashford UDC and the medallion of the East Ashford RDC. The leaved hop-cone symbolizes agriculture and the driving wheel recalls the locomotive "lnvicta", which was a feature of the Ashford UDC device and indicated the importance of the town as a railway centre.
The motto is a phase adapted from a poem by Richard Lovelace, the famous 17th century poet and a member of the Lovelace family of Bethersden in the former West Ashford Rural District. It appropriately expresses the aspirations and determination of the Borough Council.


BRIGHTON AND HOVE CITY COUNCIL (UA) (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent two Dolphins naiant on a Bordure Azure six Martlets Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure upon a Mount of Shingle Argent an Ancient Ship Azure oars and sail Argent a Banner flying from the masthead to the dexter Azure.

Motto 'INTER UNDAS ET COLLES FLOREMUS' - Between downs and sea we flourish.
Granted 1997?

The City of Brighton and Hove was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Brighton and the Borough of Hove on 1st April 1997. It was granted city status in 2000.

brighton and hove city arms

The design amalgamates with some changes in colour for difference, the shield of the Borough of Brighton and the crest of the Borough of Hove.


CANTERBURY CITY COUNCIL (KENT)
Link to Canterbury City Web Site

ARMS: Argent three Cornish Choughs proper two and one on a Chief Gules a Lion passant guardant Or.

Motto 'AVE MATER ANGLIAE' - Hail, Mother of England.
Recorded at the Visitation of 1619.

The City of Canterbury was formed by the amalgamation of the former City of Canterbury, the Herne Bay Urban District, the Whitstaple Urban District and the Bridge-Blean Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

canterbury city arms

The lion, from the Arms of England, recalls the City's links with royalty - its has been a royal city since at least the sixth century. The choughs are from the arms ascribed to St. Thomas Becket, and their combination with the royal lion is a reminder of the quarrel between Henry II and the Archbishop.


CRAWLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent on a Cross Azure between four Acorns leaved and slipped proper nine Martlets volant Or.
CREST: Out of a Crown palisado a demi Lion guardant Or brandishing in the dexter forepaw a Hammer proper.
*SUPPORTERS On the dexter a winged Lion and on the sinister an Eagle both Gules the underside of their wings fretty Argent and each holding a Thunderbolt also Gules.

Motto 'I GROW AND I REJOICE'.
Granted 8th February 1957, to the Crawley Urban District Council. Supporters granted 2nd April 1976.

The Borough of Crawley was formed by the amalgamation of the Crawley Urban District, a small part of the Cuckfield Rural District and part of the Dorking and Horley Rural District.

crawley bc arms

The cross signifies the importance of Crawley's position at the junction of the London to Brighton and Horsham to East Grinstead roads. The nine martlets are from the traditional arms of the South Saxons, and feature in many civic arms in Sussex. Their gold colour on the blue background gives the Sussex colours, and their number suggests the nine communities which made up the original Crawley New Town. The acorns commemorate the oak forests which once covered so much of North Sussex, and also symbolise strong steady growth.
The wreath and mantling are blue and white, the main colours of the arms. The palisaded crown relates to the circlet of palisades in the Crawley Development Corporation's crest and is an emblem of a planned area. The royal lion, brandishing a hammer, symbolises Manor Royal industrial estate.
The Borough of Crawley includes the important international airport at Gatwick, so the supporters are an eagle with its wings raised, and, because Gatwick is a British airport, a winged lion. The silver fretty - the criss-crossed area within the wings - represents Crawley industry, with the silver colour suggesting the steel and aluminium it uses. The two red thunderbolts, held by the lion and the eagle, represent the town's flourishing electrical industry.
The motto is a translation of a phrase from Seneca's Epistulae and refers to the establishment of a happy, expanding community.


DARTFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

*ARMS: Gules on a Chevron Or between three Bezants each charged with a Millrind Sable a Jester's Head proper habited in a Fool's Cap couped between two Sacks Gules.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon Water barry wavy Argent and Azure an Ancient Galley in full sail seven oars in action proper between two Bolts of Lightning in chevron Or.
*SUPPORTERS: on the dexter a Lion resting its interior hind leg on an Anvil and supporting a Prioress's Staff Or pendent therefrom a Veil Argent charged on the shoulder with a Roundel per pale Gules and Sable thereon a Maltese Cross Argent and on the sinister a Horse Argent resting its interior hind leg on a Garb Or and supporting a Long Hammer head upwards proper and also charged on the shoulder with a Roundel per pale Gules and Sable thereon a Maltese Cross Argent.

The Borough of Dartford was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Dartford, the Swanscombe Urban District and the parishes of Darenth, Southfleet, Stone, Sutton-at-Hone and Wilmington from the Dartford Rural District.

dartford bc arms

The chevron represents the bridge over the River Darent, from which the town of Dartford and the Parish of Darenth took their names. The three golden discs represent the three constituent councils, while their tabloid form, as those in the arms of the former Borough of Dartford, represents the pharmaceutical industries of the area. The millrinds, like those in the arms of the Dartford RDC, portray the milling of flour and agricultural engineering. The jester's head in a fool's cap, also from the former Borough's arms, symbolises the paper industry, founded in Dartford during the reign of Elizabeth I, and the two sacks represent the cement manufactured at Swanscombe.
The ancient galley, from the arms of the Rural District, is a reminder of the past Roman civilisation of the district with its many villas and burial grounds and the present shipping industry, it is shown here with seven oars representing the seven communities (Dartford and the six parishes) which form the Borough. It also recalls one of those seen from Galley Hill sailing up the Thames, past the creek which led to Southfleet, whose church is dedicated to St. Nicholas, patron of mariners. The lightning over the galley stands for the electricity produced at Littlebrook Power Station on the banks of the Thames at Stone, whose parish church was known as the "Lantern of Kent" from its beacon light known to all sailors on the river.
The Lion of England is a reminder of Dartford's royal history. King Henry III's sister was married to the Holy Roman Emperor by proxy in Gundulf's Church on the Darent, and Anne of Cleves lived in the Tudor Manor House, which was later used by Elizabeth I as a royal residence. The staff sybolises the priory founded by Edward III, it also brings to mind the Hermits of the Ford, the Martyrs of the Brent and other holy men and women who kept the faith alive in this part of Kent, while the anvil represents the engineering industries, that occupy the lands of the old priory. The white horse of Kent is from the arms of the County Council, and the long hammer is the symbol of Wat Tyler, by tradition a citizen of Dartford, who led the Kentish peasants in a revolt against unjust taxes, while the wheatsheaf represents agriculture. The Maltese crosses represent the Knights of the Hospital of St. John of Jerusalem, whose commandery was at Sutton-at-Hone.
The motto is adapted from the school song "Floreat Dartfordia" written by S.J. Steane, a Dartford citizen and former master for Dartford Grammar School, which was founded in the reign of Elizabeth I.


DOVER DISTRICT COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure on a Fess wavy counterchanged between two demi-Lions passant guardant each conjoined to the Hulk of a Ship a like Hulk conjoined to a demi-Lion counter passant all Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules a demi Horse Argent supporting a Tower Gold.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Sea Horse Argent gorged with a Naval Crown Or and grasping in the fin of the interior foot a Sword bendwise Argent pommel hilt and quillons Gold.
BADGE: Within an Annulet embattled on the outer edge a demi Lion passant guardant conjoined to the Hulk of a Ship Gold.

Granted 19th October 1987.

The Dover District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Deal, the Borough of Dover, the Borough of Sandwich, the Dover Rural District and the Eastry Rural District, except for five parishes now in the Thanet District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

dover dc arms

The arms are based on those of the Cinque Ports, since the District contains two Ports. Dover and Sandwich were Head Ports and Deal was attached to Sandwich. The sterns of the ships are based on those in the arms of Sandwich, while the colouring follows those of Dover.
The horse is from the arms of the Kent County Council and the tower, like those in the crest of the Borough of Deal, symbolise the civic nature of the arms and the military significance of Dover, Walmer, Deal and Richborough Castles.
The sea horses combine the horse of Kent with fish tails and naval crowns for the many maritime associations, and swords for the area's military importance.


EASTBOURNE BOROUGH COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent on a Fesse double cottised Gules a Rose Or between two Stags' Heads caboshed of the field.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Sea-Horse raising the dexter foot Vert.

Motto 'MELIORA SEQUIMUR' - We follow the better things.
Granted 11th January 1928, to the Eastbourne County Borough Council.

eastbourne bc arms

The design is based on a similar device used before the arms were granted. The double-cotised fess is from the arms of the family of Badlesmere, which anciently held the Manor. The stag's heads are from the arms of the Cavendish family, Dukes of Devonshire, and the rose refers to the Davis-Gilbert family. Both families were principal landowners in Eastbourne and members of which, were important in its development as a resort.
The seahorse is appropriate to a coastal town.


ELMBRIDGE BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Azure on a Pile reversed throughout Or between two Sprigs of Oak Argent over Water in base barry wavy of four Azure and Argent a Bridge of two arches issuant therefrom an Elm Tree proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within a Saxon Crown Or a Grassy Mount proper thereon a Griffin passant Argent supporting a Staff proper flying therefrom a forked Pennon Azure charged in the hoist with a Mullet of nine points Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side an Eagle Argent wings elevated and addorsed Gules perched on a Sprig of Elm with two leaves proper and holding in the beak a Rose Gules charged with another Argent barbed seeded and stalked with two leaves proper.
BADGE: On an Oval Or over Water in base barry wavy of four Azure and Argent a Bridge of two arches issuant therefrom an Elm Tree proper.

Motto 'DUM DEFLUANT AMNES' - Till the rivers cease to flow.
Granted 10th August 1976.

The Borough of Elmbridge was formed by the amalgamation of the Esher Urban District and the Walton and Weybridge Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

elmbridge bc arms
elmbridge badge
Badge

The division of the shield is suggested by the chevron in the arms of the Esher UDC, this was derived from the arms of the d'Abernons, the colours blue and gold are from the arms of the Warennes, Earls of Surrey, the Surrey County Council and the arms of both constituent authorities. The two sprigs of oak like those in the County's arms signify two Surrey authorities. The elm on a bridge is an obvious reference to the name of the Borough, derived from the ancient Hundred of Elmbridge, which was largely coterminious with the present Borough. The bridge has two arches for the union of two authorities and the waves refer to the rivers Thames, Mole, Wey and Ember.
The gold Saxon crown from the crest of the Walton and Weybridge UDC, refers to the Saxon Hundred of Elmbridge, whose Moot was held at the bridge over the River Mole. The mound represents Esher Common, on which stands the white griffin from the Esher arms, derived from the arms of the Evelyns of Wotton, Cardinal Wolsey and the Reeds of Oatlands. The nine pointed star on the pennon symbolizes the union of nine civil parishes in the Borough.
The supporters combine the white eagle from the arms of Esher with the red eagle from the arms of Walton and Weybridge. In the former, it was derived from the arms of Merton Priory, landowners in Molesey for four centuries, and in the later it refered to the area's Roman associations. The sprigs of elm with two leaves are a further reference to the two former authorities and the Tudor roses are from the arms of Walton and Weybridge.
The motto is a variation of that previously used by Walton and Weybridge UDC.


EPSOM AND EWELL BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Epsom and Ewell BC Web Site

ARMS: Per chevron Vert and Argent in chief two Horses' Heads erased Or and in base as many Bars wavy Azure.

Motto 'NON SUCH'.
Granted 4th September 1937.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

epsom and ewell bc arms

The basic colours of the shield green and white, symbolize the grass and chalk of the Downs and the many trees in the neighbourhood. The horses' heads of course refer to the most famous race-course in the world and the important training industry, which provides employment for many in the town. The blue waves represent Ewell with its streams and wells.
The motto recalls the old royal palace of Nonsuch.


GRAVESHAM BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Argent upon Water barry wavy in base proper an East Indiaman in full sail with Pennons flying all proper on a Chief Gules the Sails of a Windmill proper betweem two Buckles Or each interlaced by as many Quill Pens in saltire proper.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Tower Gules charged with a Bull's Head issuing from a Ducal Coronet both Or and vomiting Flames of Fire proper.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Sea-Porcupine proper and on the sinister side a Horse Argent all upon a Compartment per pale of Waves of the Sea barry wavy and a Grassy Mount proper.

Granted 15th July 1975.

The Borough of Gravesham was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Gravesend, the Northfleet Urban District and the parishes of Cobham, Higham, Luddesdown, Meopham and Shorne from the Strood Rural District.

gravesham bc arms

The East Indiaman recalls Pitcher’s Dockyard in Northfleet, where these ships were built. The windmill sails refer to the windmill at Meopham, while the quill pens indicate the Borough’s connections with Charles Dickins. The gold buckles are from the arms of the former Gravesend Borough Council.
The tower and bull’s head are also taken from the Gravesend arms, they are derived from an old seal.
The sea porcupine is inspired by the arms of the Portreve of Gravesend and the white horse is from the arms of the County Council. The compartment alludes to the marine and agricultural interests of the Borough.


GUILDFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Guildford BC Web Site

ARMS: Sable on a Mount Vert between two Woolpacks a Castle with three Towers Argent the central one triple-towered and charged with a Shield of the Royal Arms of France and England quarterly the outer towers each surmounted by a Spire under the battlements two Roses in fesse and within the open port beneath a Portcullis a Key all Or on the Mount before the port a Lion couchant guardant also Or the Base barry wavy Argent and Azure all within a Bordure Or charged with three Cornish choughs proper.
CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of four Ears of Wheat and as many Acorns slipped and leaved set alternately upon a Rim Or, a demi-Lion Argent about the neck a Rope proper entwined there with a Key fessewise Sable and between the forepaws a Flaxbreaker Gold.

Motto 'FORTITER ET FIDELITER' - Bravely and faithfully.
Granted 8th January 1975.

The Borough of Guildford was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Guildford and the Guildford Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

guildford bc arms

The arms are a combination of the arms of the former Borough of Guildford with the addition of a gold border charged with the Cornish Coughs from the arms of the Guildford RDC.
The crest is very similar to that of the Guildford RDC, suitably differenced by the substitution of a key for the original anchor, which presumably is derived from the keys in the County arms.


HASTINGS BOROUGH COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure a Lion passant guardant Or between in chief and in base a Lion passant guardant Gold dimidiating with the Hulk of a Ship Argent.

Recorded at the Visitation of 1634.

hastings bc arms

The arms are a variation of those of the Cinque Ports, the one complete lion is said to indicate Hasting's status as the chief port of the group.


HORSHAM DISTRICT COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

*ARMS: Azure a Lion rampant Argent resting the dexter hind foot on a representation of the letter H Or and charged on the shoulder with a Cross crosslet fitchy Gules all within a Bordure of the second.
*CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or between two Lilies in bend sinister slipped and leaved proper a demi Lion charged on the shoulder with a Cross crosslet fitchy Gules; Mantled Azure doubled Argent.

Motto 'PROUDLY WE SERVE'.
Granted ?.

The Horsham District was formed by the amalgamation of the Horsham Urban District, the Chanctonbury Rural District and the Horsham Rural District.

horsham dc arms

The arms are based upon those of the former Horsham UDC, which date from at least 1844, where they are attributed to the town in Burke's General Armory, and were formally granted in 1944. The lion derives from the arms of the families of De Braose and Mowbray, Lords of the Manor during the Middle Ages. As in the Horsham shield it is displayed on a blue background with its right foot resting on a rep­resentation of the letter "H" for Horsham. The white border was added for difference and to represent the wider new District.
The gold mural is symbolic of local government and the lion is repeated from the arms, here shown between two lilies, which allude to the dedication of the Parish Church of St Mary's. Both lions are charged on the shoulder with a red cross crosslet fitchy, derived from the arms of the Duke of Norfolk, who presented the reconstructed Town Hall to Horsham in 1888.
The motto was previously used by the Horsham UDC.


LEWES DISTRICT COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Gules a Sealion rampant Or a Bordure compony Azure and Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Eagle displayed Sable armed and langed Gules crowned with a Saxon Crown and gorged with a Collar pendent therefrom an Anchor Or.

Granted 1975.

The Lewes District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Lewes, the Newhaven Urban District, the Seaford Urban District and the Chailey Rural District.

Images courtesy of The Heraldry Society.

lewes dc arms
newhaven device
Device of the Newhaven Town Council

The golden lion and border of blue and gold checks are taken from the former arms of the Borough of Lewes and reflect the influence of the Fitzalan and de Warenne families respectively. William de Warenne was after the Norman Conquest granted the Rape of Lewes (one of the Anglo-Saxon divisions of the ancient Kingdom of Sussex into six administrative areas). His family held the Barony of Lewes until 1347 when, the last male member of the de Warenne family died leaving, as his heiress, a sister who had married a Fitzalan, and whose son. Richard Fitzalan, Earl of Arundel, became Lord of the Barony of Lewes, Before the Barony of Lewes came to them, the coat of arms of the Fitzalan family consisted of a gold lion on a red background, but it appears that thereafter they were drawn to show the de Warenne gold and blue chequers on the left hand side of the shield and the gold lion on a red background on the right hand side. The lion's hindquarters have been replaced with a sea lion's tail to symbolise the coastal and maritime interest of the District.
The black eagle is taken from the arms originally borne by the d'Aquila family, Lords of the Manor of Seaford. The eagle appeared on the 13th century seal of the ancient Borough of Seaford and formed part of the arms of the Seaford UDC. The eagle wears a golden collar from which is suspended a golden anchor - the principal emblem of the badge of the Newhaven Town Council and former Urban District Council. The Saxon Crown is derived from the arms of the East Sussex County Council and this recognises not only that Lewes District is within the administrative county of East Sussex, but that the County Town of Lewes is the centre of justice and the seat of local administration.


MAIDSTONE BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Or a Fesse wavy Azure between three Torteaux on a Chief Gules a Lion passant guardant Or.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or a Horse's Head Argent gorged with a Chaplet of Hops fructed proper, Mantled Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Iguanodon proper collared Gules and on the sinister side a Lion Or collared Gules.

Motto 'AGRICULTURE AND COMMERCE'.
Arms recorded (without tinctures) at the Visition of 17th August 1619. Arms confirmed and Crest and Supporters granted 30th June 1949, to the former Borough. Granted again (without the scrolls of parchment suspended from the collars of the Supporters) 26th November 1987.

The Borough of Maidstone was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Maidstone, the Hollingbourn Rural District and the Maidstone Rural District.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

maidstone bc arms

The wavy fess represents the River Medway and the red roundels are from the arms of Archbishop Courtenay, who built All Saints Church, at the end of the fourteenth century. The lion is that of England.
The mural crown represents municipal government and the horse’s head recalls the arms of the County Council. The hops refer to the produce for which the district is famous.
The Iguanodon refers to the town’s prehistoric background, a complete skeleton of this creature having been found within the Borough. The Lion is derived from that in the arms. The supporters originally had scrolls hanging from the collars about their necks bearing the dates 1549, when Maidstone received its first charter of incorporation and 1949, the 400th anniversary.


MEDWAY (UA) (KENT)

*ARMS: Azure upon a Bridge of four arches Argent a Lion passant guardant Or.
*CREST: Out of a Naval Crown Or three Towers Argent the centre tower enfiled with a Wreath of Broom and the two outer towers enfiled with a Wreath of Oak Azure.
*SUPPORTERS: On either side a Sea Horse Argent tails and fins Azure each gorged with a Collar chequy of the Or and Gules pendent therefrom an Ancient Harp and each supporting a Trident Gold.

Motto 'FORWARD TOGETHER' - .
Granted 22nd November 1999.

The Borough Medway was formed (as The Medway Towns) by the amalgamation of the City of Rochester upon Medway and the Borough of Gillingham on 1st April 1998.

Picture and description courtesy of Laurence Jones.

medway arms
The lion is that of England atop a bridge of four arches. This represents a new English council arising from the four former ones - Gillingham, Rochester, Strood and Chatham.
The crest is based on that of the former Rochester upon Medway City Council, with a changed in colours and the addition of three wreaths. The centre tower has a wreath of broom, which is derived from the sprig of broom in the arms of the Borough of Gillingham. The other towers have oak wreaths, coloured blue.
The two sea horses are a maritime version of the White Horse of Kent, showing that this is a maritime district in Kent. The checky collars and tridents were used in the similar supporters of Rochester upon Medway. The harps are taken from the arms of Gillingham.


MID SUSSEX DISTRICT COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Quarterly per fess indented Or and Gules on a Pale raguly Argent over all between four Roundels counterchanged a Round-headed Rampion Flower slipped and leaved proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules upon a Grassy Mount proper an Eagle displayed Or the underside of each wing charged with a Cross of Malta Gules a Millrind suspended round the neck Sable.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA EST' - The good of the people comes first.
Granted 27th April 1978.

The Mid Sussex District was formed by the amalgamation of the Burgess Hill Urban District, the Cuckfield Urban District, the East Grinstead Urban District and most of the Cuckfield Rural District.

mid sussex dc arms

The background division into four emphasises the coming together of the four former local authorities, the roundels which have been counterchanged, red and gold, give artistic effect. The colours of the four divisions an echo of the Crest. The Pale and the division across the shield are made up of varied lines in order that they may be taken as an allusion to the task of binding the area together and combining in close union and association the various groups and interests which have been brought together to form the new Mid Sussex District. The round-headed rampion, commonly called "the Pride of Sussex" has been used as the main charge on the shield. This has been placed on a Pale, which having been placed in the middle of the shield give the notion of "mid" and so of Mid Sussex District Council. The other areas on either side of the Pale also emphasise this idea of being "mid".
The golden Roman Eagle is a reference to the deep penetration of the area by the Romans. About the neck of the bird is suspended a black Mill Iron as a reference to the historic iron industry of the area, while the wings have been charged with red eight pointed Crosses in reference to the Knights Templar who, historic­ally, once held great Estates in the area. The Eagle stands upon green turf in allusion to the area.


MOLE VALLEY DISTRICT COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Mole Valley DC Web Site

ARMS: Or on a Fess wavy Azure between three acorns slipped and leaved proper a Bar wavy Argent a Chief dancetty of two points upwards Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of a Mural Crown Argent between two Branches of Oak leaved proper a Swan roussant Argent holding in the beak a Sword point upwards Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Dorking Cock holding in the beak a Pine Cone all proper.
BADGE: On a Fountain fimbriated Or a Pile Or thereon three Acorns conjoined on one stem leaved and slipped proper.

Motto 'MINISTRANDO VIGILANS' - Vigilant in our serving.
Granted 3rd June 1975.

The Mole Valley District was formed by the amalgamation of the Dorking Urban District, the Leatherhead Urban District and most of the Dorking and Horley Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

mole valley dc arms
molevalley badge
Badge

The blue and white wave represents the River Mole, with the two Dorking areas on one side and the Leatherhead area on the other. The acorns are from the arms of the three former auithorities and the Surrey County Council. Above the acorns are two stylised hills, representing Box Hill and Leith Hill, two notable geographical features of the district, with a blue sky above. The outline of the hills also suggests the letter M with a V in the middle.
The crest's basic colours of gold and blue, the traditional Surrey livery, are taken from the arms of the Warrennes, first Earls of Surrey. The mural crown, is a familiar symbol of local government, coloured white as in the crest of the Dorking UDC and a direct reference to the prevalence of Dorking Lime in many local buildings. The swan was prominent in the crest of the Leatherhead UDC, in which it alluded to the old Swan Inn of coaching days and to the river and other local waters. The swan holds in its beak a red sword pointing upwards, refering to the association with the City of London through the City Freeman's School and to the connection between the former arms and the Second World War, the Leatherhead arms being the first in heraldry to commemorate the unity of purpose of the Civil Defence Services. Flanking the swan are two branches of oak leaves linking with the oak in the shield and are a direct reference to the former Leatherhead crest and the County arms.
The two cocks are of the distinctive five-toed Dorking breed, and are taken from the Dorking UDC crest, they characterise the surrounding rural area. Each cock holds in its beak a pine cone from the crest of the Dorking and Horley RDC, they refer to the Weald and Leith Hill wooded area of the district.
Tho motto,'Ministrando Vigilans' ('Vigilant in our serving') which gives the initials MV is a derivation of those of the former Dorking and Leatherhead Councils.


REIGATE AND BANSTEAD BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Reigate and Banstead BC Web Site

ARMS: Checky Azure and Or on a Mount in base and in front of an Oak Tree a Port with Portcullis raised between two Towers proper on a Chief Sable a Woolpack Or between two Sprigs of Oak fructed Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi figure representing a Pilgrim grasping his Staff with his dexter hand and habited in traditional Costume with Scrip proper a Cloak Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion and on the sinister side a Horse Argent each gorged with a Wreath Or and Azure and charged on the shoulders with a Fountain that on the dexter charged with a Tanner's Knife and that on the sinister with a Sallow Leaf proper.
BADGE: On a Fountain environed by a Wreath of Oak fructed proper a Woolpack ensigned with an Oak Tree and Port as in the Arms.

Motto 'NEVER WONNE NE NEVER SHALL'.
Granted 30th May 1975.

The Borough of Reigate and Banstead was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Reigate, the Banstead Urban District and part of the Dorking and Horley Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

reigate and banstead bc arms
reigate and banstead badge
Badge

As in the arms of the Borough of Reigate, the background is the blue and gold chequers of the Warrennes, Earls of Surrey, Lords of Reigate and founders of the Priory in medieval times. The old device of the gate and oak tree is from the former seal and arms of Reigate, in the new arms the device is shown in its proper colours instead of white. The black chief, also from the old Reigate arms, is charged with the simple device of the Banstead UDC, the gold woolpack. It refers to the former importance of sheep-rearing and wool-production in Banstaad and also to the historic Wodpack Inn. The two sprigs of oak, as in the Surrey CC arms, refer to the two Surrey parishes of Horley and Salfords & Sidlow.
The mantling is in the basic Surrey colours of the Warrennes, blue and gold. The half length figure of one of the Pilgrim supporters of the former Reigate BC arms, is an obvious reference to the ancient Pilgrims' Way, which is common to both Reigate and Banstead.
The white lion and horse, are the supporters of the Howards, late Earls of Surrey. The lion was the crest of the Reigate BC in reference to the Lords Howard of Effingham, later Lords of Reigate. This was derived from the white lion of the de Mowbrays, who were prominent in Banstead and held the manor in the 12th century, so the lion is appropriate to both places. The horse is also a reference to the tradition of horse-racing on Banstead Downs, starting in the 17th century and immortalised in the famous Oaks race. The heraldic fountains on the shoulders indicate the River Mole at both Horley and Sidlow bridge. The tanner's knife, the ancient emblem of St. Bartholomew, patron of the parish of Horley, alludes to one of its ancient crafts, the leather industry. It is possible that the choice of this saint for the dedication of the church was due to the importance of this craft in ancient times. The sallow-leaf, refers to the name Salfords, the derivation of which is usually "sallow ford".
The motto is that used by the former Reigate BC.


RUNNYMEDE BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Vert a representation of Magna Carta ensigned by a representation of the Crown of King John proper on a Chief Argent two Barrulets wavy Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert upon Waves in front of a representation of Chertsey Abbey a Swan all proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Swan gorged with a Crown as in the Arms pendent therefrom by a Ribbon Azure a representation of Magna Carta proper.
BADGE: Upon a Fountain in front of a represenation of Chertsey Abbey a Swan statant proper.

Motto 'IN FREEDOM WE SERVE'.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Runnymede was formed by the amalgamation of the Chertsey Urban District and the Egham Urban District.

runnymede bc arms

The arms like those of the Egham UDC refer to the earlier history of the district, with the representation of the Magna Carta, and the Crown of King John. It will be recalled that the "signing" (or more accurately sealing) of the Great Charter of Freedom by King John took place in the year 1215 and it concludes with these words "Given by Our hand in the meadow which is called Runnymede between Windsor and Staines, in the Fifteenth Day of June in the Seventeenth year of Our Reign". The blue waves refer to the River Thames
The crest recalls, like that of the Chertsey UDC, the Benedictine Abbey of St. Peter at Chertsey. Its founding in 666 started the recorded history of the entire area, for its lands and influence extended over the whole of this part of Surrey. The Abbey was founded by Erkenwald, who later became Bishop of London. The swan from the crest of the Egham UDC, is a further reference to the River Thames.
The motto is a combination of those of Egham and Chertsey.


SHEPWAY DISTRICT COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure an Ancient Ship with fighting top and mast ensigned by a Cross Patee Or the sail furled Argent in chief a demi Lion passant guardant dimidiated with the hulk of a Ship Or and on two Flaunches of the last six Roses Gules each charged with a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or Gules and Azure a Mount Vert thereon in front of a Pastoral Staff Or a demi double headed Eagle displayed Sable beaked Gold and charged on the breast with a Heart proper, Mantled Gules and Azure doubled Or.

Motto 'AMOENITAS ET SALUBRITAS' - Delightfulness and Healthiness.
Granted 30th April 1974.

The Shepway District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Folkestone, the Borough of Hythe, the Borough of Lydd, the Borough of New Romney, the Elham Rural District and the Romney Marsh Rural District.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

shepway dc arms

The lion joined to the hulk of a medieval ship is the long established device from the arms of the Cinque Ports and reflects the District's historic association with that Confederation. The ancient ship is a further reference to the region's maritime nature, and is based on the kind of vessels shown on the seals of the former ancient boroughs of Hythe, Lydd and New Romney and the ancient Town of Folkestone, and thus generally represents them and their history. The six double roses, stand for the six constituent parts which composed the District, roses being particularly suitable, as they suggest the Garden of England as Kent is known.
The grassy mount symbolizes farming, and can also be regarded as referring to the former Elham Rural District. The black double headed eagle is from the crest of the Borough of Folkstone, derived from the attributed arms of Julius Caesar, who according to legend landed near Folkestone. The crosier represents St. Eanswyth, one of supporters of the Folkstone arms and the heart on its breast refers to Dr. William Harvey, discoverer of the circulatory system, who was born in Folkstone and whose figure was also a supporter of the town's arms.
The motto, a variation of Folkestone's, refers to delightfulness (of scenery) and healthiness (of locality).


SPELTHORNE BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Spelthorne BC Web Site

ARMS: Per fess Azure and barry wavy of six Azure and Argent in chief in front of a rising Sun Or a representation of Staines Bridge issuant and in base a Thorn Tree proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours between two Sprigs of Oak each fructed of as many Acorns two Seaxes in saltire points downward proper hilts and pomels Or perched thereon a Swan rousant proper.

Motto 'AD SOLEM PROSPICIMUS' - We look towards the Sun.
Granted 25th July 1974.

The Borough of Spelthorne was formed by the amalgamation of the Staines Urban District and the Sunbury Urban District. These two authorities were in formerly in Middlesex and were transferred to Surrey in 1965, upon the abolision of the Middlesex County Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

spelthorne bc arms

The white and blue waves, which are common to the arms of both former authorities, represents the River Thames. Against them stands a thorn tree recalling the famous tree which gave its name to the ancient Hundred of Spelthorne in Middlesex. Spanning the waves is Staines Bridge from the arms of the Staines UDC, and behind it is the allusive sun from the crest of the Sunbury UDC. The sun also suggests the dawn of a new life for Spelthorne.
The swan again recalls the River Thames, an important factor in the life of the Borough. The seaxes (Saxon swords) where common to the arms of both former authorities and the Middlesex County Council. The two sprigs of oak, from the arms of the Surrey County Council, symbolise the new Borough in Surrey.
The motto is a combination of those of Staines and Sunbury, and implies the facing of the dawn of a new civic era.


SURREY HEATH BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Per pale Azure and Sable a Chief per pale Or and Argent over all a Stag's Head caboshed the attires interlaced with two Swords in saltire proper points upward hilts and pomels Or in chief a Sword in bend proper hilt and pomel Gules enfiling two Keys in bend sinister addorsed the bows interlaced the upper Gules the lower Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure on a Mount of Heath proper environed of eight Fir Cones erect a Lion passant guardant Or crowned Gules and holding in the dexter paw a Grenade Sable fired proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an Owl Argent membered Or claws Gules gorged with a Wreath Argent and Azure and on the sinister side a Falcon proper belled Or and gorged with a Wreath Or and Gules each resting the exterior claw on a Sprig of Oak fructed of two Acorns proper.
BADGE: Upon an Oval Argent environed by a Torse Or and Azure a Mount of Heath issuant in base thereon a Scots Pine all proper.

Motto 'FESTINA DILIGENTER' - Make hast carefully.
Granted 20th September 1974.

The Borough of Surrey Heath was formed by the amalgamation of the Frimley and Camberley Urban District and the Bagshot Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

surrey heath bc arms
surrey heath badge
Badge

The vertical division of the background into blue and black is like the arms of the Surrey County Council. A chief was common the the arms of both former authorities, divided into gold and white like the shield of Chertsey Abbey which, being connected with the history of the whole area, was commemorated in the arms of both former councils; the Bagshot RDC had the gold and white backgrouind, while the Frimley and Camberley UDC had the keys and sword of St Peter and St Paul, shown here on the on the gold and white chief. The crossed swords, interlaced with the antlers of a stag's head, are derived from the principal emblems in the previous councils' arms, the crossed swords of the Army badge indicating the importance of the Royal Military Academy at Sandhurst and the Staff College at Camberley and the former military camp at Chobham. The stag's head alludes to Bagshot Park, a royal demesne since Norman times, and to the fact that much of the district was formerly part of Windsor Forest. The interlacing of the swords with the antlers symbolises the union of the two districts.
The wreath and mantling are in the principal colour and metal of the arms, blue and gold, the ancient liveries of the Warenne Earls of Surrey and of the County Council. The circle of fir cones from the crest of Bagshot RDC encloses a mound of heathland in reference to Bagshot Heath. The the royal lion from the Bagshot arms, is crowned with a red crown like the Stanhope lion in the crest of the Frimley and Camberly UDC, the latter holds a grenade or fire-ball, and this is shown in the royal lion's forepaw.
The white owl is derived from one the three in the Frimley and Camberley shield, alluding to the le Marchant baronets of Chobham, one of whom was first Lieutenant-Governor of the Royal Military College. As in the former shield, the owl stands on a sprig of oak, the Surrey badge. The falcon is derived from the crest of Bagshot, here it reverts to its original function as a supporter, being that of the Earls of Onslow. Each is wreathed about the neck with livery colours of the arms of the two former councils, white and blue for Frimley and Camberley, gold and red for Bagshot.
The motto is derived from those of Onslow and Bagshot, and its import here is the ideal of progress with speed and efficiency.


SWALE BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)
Link to Swale BC Web Site

ARMS: Or upon a Fess wavy Azure between in chief a Lion passant guardant Gules dimidiating the Hull of an Ancient ship Azure and in base five Cherries with stalks leaves and twig conjoined all proper a Bar wavy Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Ram Azure armed Or and a Horse Argent combatant supporting a Mural Crown Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Sea-Lion proper the head and mane Or supporting an Abbatial Crozier and Veil all proper and on the sinister a like Lion supporting a Pilgrim's Staff and Wallet all proper.
BADGE: Four Sea-Swallows volant in saltire wings conjoined beaks to the centre Azure.

Motto 'KNOWN BY THEIR FRUITS'.
Granted 22nd February 1977.

The Borough of Swale was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Faversham, the Borough of Queenborough-in-Sheppey, the Sittingbourne and Milton Urban District and the Swale Rural District.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

swale bc arms
swale badge
Badge

The gold background represents the area's historical, agricultural and industrial wealth, and the central blue and white wave, symbolises the docks, port and River Swale. The lion joined to the hulk of a medieval ship is from the arms of the Cinque Ports of which Faversham is a limb. The cherries, like the tree in the crest of the Sittingbourne and Milton UDC, represent the very first ones grown in England, here in Teynham during the reign of Henry VIII.
The Ram represents the Isle of Sheep, or Sheppey as it is now called. The Horse is the Invicta symbolising the County of Kent and the mural crown they hold indicates local government.
The two lions are the Royal beasts of England, here given fish tails because of the area's marine importance. The one on the left is holding a staff and veil which refers to the old Monastries at Minster and Faversham. The one on the right is carrying a pilgrims staff and purse because of the fact that the area is part of the Pilgrims Way from London to Canterbury.
The motto is that previously used by the Sittingbourne and Milton UDC.


TANDRIDGE DISTRICT COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Tandridge DC Web Site

ARMS: Gules three Bezants each charged with an Estoile of eight rays also Gules.
CREST: Upon a Mural Crown Or a Grasshopper Vert Mantled Gules doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Griffin Or holding a Sword erect proper the quillons formed of a Vol Or the pommel Azure.
BADGE: Four Tau Crosses joined in cross at the foot Or.

Motto 'CONCORDIA' - Harmony.
Granted 17th March 1977.

The Tandridge District was formed by the amalgamation of the Caterham and Warlingham Urban District and the Godstone Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

tandridge dc arms
tandridge badge
Badge

The red background with three bezants or roundels of gold, is taken from the seal of the Augustinian Priory of St. James atTandridge which flourished from about 1200 until 1537. The red estoiles are derived from the arms of the Cobham family of Lingfield.
The mural crown is symbolic of municipal government as well as of military defence. The grasshopper is from the crest of the Gresham family, which at one time owned a number of manors within the district.
The gold griffins are taken from the arms of the Evelyn family who were connected with Godstone and Felbridge at various times during the 16th to 18th centuries. Each griffin holds a blue winged sword which is an allusion to Kenley Aerodrome established in 1917 and an important fighter station during World War II.


TONBRIDGE AND MALLING BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Argent a Pale wavy Azure between two Piles reversed Sable a Chief embattled Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules issuing from the top of a Tower Gules a Horse's Head Argent gorged with two Garlands of Hops saltirewise proper.

Motto 'FORWARD IN UNISON'.
Granted 12th March 1976.

The Borough of Tonbridge and Malling was formed by the amalgamation of the Tonbridge Urban District, the Malling Rural District and the parishes of Hadlow and Hildenborough, from the Tonbridge Rural District.

tonbridge and malling bc arms

The embattled red chief and the wavy blue pale suggests a letter T and depict the River Medway flowing under the great bridge at Tonbridge and downstream into the Malling area, which is represented by the two inverted black piles, suggesting a letter M. The chief can be taken as an allusion to a bridge or castle, both of which appeared in the arms and crest of the Tonbridge UDC.
The Invicta or Kentish horse, from the arms of the County Council, shows that the Borough is in that county, and the wreath of hops refers to one of the local industries. The tower is symbolic of the ancient abbeys and castles: - Tonbridge Castle, Malling Abbey, Leybourne Castle and Aylesford Friary, which make an important historic contribution to the amenities of the Borough.
The motto expresses the desire of this Council for the Borough to go forward as an entity and to plan for the future needs of the Borough as a whole.


TUNBRIDGE WELLS BOROUGH COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Or on a Pile Vert a Fountain charged with a Saxon Crown Or in base a Bine of Hops leaved and fructed and a Sprig of Apple leaved and flowered in saltire proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules issuant from a stone Well-head a Ram's Head proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Demoiselle Crane proper and on the sinister a Horse argent each gorged with a Collar gobony Or and Gules upon a Compartment of Sandstone Rocks proper.

Motto 'DO WELL AND DOUBT NOT'.
Granted 2nd April 1976.

The Borough of Tunbridge Wells was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Royal Tunbridge Wells, the Southborough Urban District, the Cranbrook Rural District and the Tonbridge Rural District, except for two parishes now in the Borough of Tonbridge and Malling.

tunbridge wells bc arms

The green and gold of the background represents the country and town areas respectively. The inverted triangle shape, like that in the arms of the former Borough, but now coloured green denotes the geological fault which gives rise to numerous local springs, including the Chalybeate Spring, symbolised by the blue and white circle, around which Tunbridge Wells developed. The Saxon crown shows the town's 'Royal' prefix. The hop bine and apple blossom symbolise the rural areas.
The ram's head derives from the crest of the Southborough UDC and the well-head, as in the former crest, again represents the Tunbridge Wells Chalybeate Spring.
The gold and red of the wreath and mantling are the same as those of the former Borough. The crane represents Cranbrook and the horse, from the arms of the County Council, the location of the Borough in Kent. The compartment indicates the local outcrops of sandstone.


WAVERLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Sable a Cross flory saltirewise Vert fimbriated Or surmounted of a Plate thereon a Bar undy Azure between in chief a representationof the Town Hall at Godalming and in base of Fox's Tower at Farnham Castle in dexter flank an Oak Sprig fructed of an Acorn and in sinister flank a Crane in its vigilance all Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert a representation of the ruined east end of Waverley Abbey pierced with three lancet windows all proper Mantled Gules and Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'OPPIDA RUSQUE UNA' - Town and countryside in unity.
Granted 6th September 1985?.

The Borough of Waverley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Godalming, the Farnham Urban District, the Haslemere Urban District and the Hambledon Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

waverley bc arms

The four quarters show symbols, denoting the four main areas within the Borough. The chief refers to Godalming, the oak sprig to Haslemere, the crane to Cranleigh and the castle to Farnham. The wavy blue line refers to the River Wey and is also a pun in reference to Waverley.
The crest refers to Waverley Abbey, which lent its name to the Borough. The lancet windows were used in the Council's logo since 1974.


WEALDEN DISTRICT COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent issuing from a Grassy Mount in base an Oak Tree leaved and fructed proper on a Chief wavy Azure a Castle with two flanking Towers Argent.
CREST: Opon a Grassy Mount proper between two Martlets Azure a Plough Or thereon a Martlet Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Bay Horse gorged with a Chaplet of Ash-Leaves and on the sinister side a Fallow Deer gorged with a Chaplet of Heather (Calluna vulgaris) all proper.

Motto 'INTERIORA RURIS' - .
Granted 29th March 1989.

The Wealden District was formed by the amalgamation of the Hailsham Rural District and the Uckfield Rural District.

wealden dc arms

The oak tree, like that in the arms of Uckfield RDC, represents Ashdown Forest and can be seen as typifying the district's agricultural activities. The blue wavy chief and the castle are derived from the arms of the Hailsham RDC.
The blue martlets represent the County of Sussex and the plough is also from the Hailsham arms.
The horse represents the cultivated areas and the fallow deer the heaths and downs of the District.


WOKING BOROUGH COUNCIL (SURREY)
Link to Woking BC Web Site

ARMS: Quarterly Or and Gules a Cross Flory between in the first and fourth Quarters a Fleur-de-Lys and in the second and third Quarters a Fret all counter-changed

Motto 'FIDE ET DILIGENTIA' - By faith and diligence.
Granted 18th June 1930, to the Woking Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

woking bc arms

The arms are made up of elements derived from the heraldry of past holders of the Manor of Woking. The cross is from the arms attributed to Edward the Confessor and the red and gold colouring is from the arms of Bassett family, to whom the manor was granted by King John, shortly after his accession. On the death of Aliva Bassett in 1281, the Manor passed to her son Hugh le Despenser, and it is from the Despenser family arms that the frets are taken. The fleurs-de-lis are from the arms of the Beaufort Dukes of Somerset, who came into possesion of the Manor in 1416. Margaret Beaufort, mother of Henry VII, lived at Woking Palace and her grandson, Henry VIII, also live there from time to time.


WORTHING BOROUGH COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Barry wavy of six Azure and Argent three Fishes naiant in pale proper on a Chief wavy Or a Cornucopia also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Female figure proper habited Argent and Azure grasping in both hands a Snake also proper.

Motto 'EX TERRA COPIAM E MARI SALUTEM' - From the land fulness and from the sea health.
Granted 30th October 1919, transferred by the Local Authorities (Armorial Bearings) Order 1974, the endorsement on the Letters Patent being dated 25th November 1974.

worthing bc arms

The emblems on the shield are explained by the motto.
The figure forming the crest is probably Hygieia, although it is not described as such in the grant.


TOWN AND PARISH COUNCILS

ARUNDEL TOWN COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Or three Martlets Sable on a Chief embattled Gules a Lion rampant of the first between two Cross crosslets fitchée Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Fleur-de-Lys Or a Swallow rising to the sinister proper.

Motto 'ANTIQUA CONSTANS VIRTUTE' - Steadfast in ancient virtue.
Granted 14th January 1939, to the Arundel Borough Council.

arundel tc arms

The martlets are from the arms of the West Sussex CC and the embattled chief repre­sents Arundel Castle. The lion of the Fitzalan family and the cross crosslets of the Howard family are from the heraldry of the Duke of Norfolk.
The swallow (hirondelle) is an allusion to the place-name and has been the device of Arundel from time immemorial.


BOGNOR REGIS TOWN COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Azure on a Pile Or a Saxon Crown gules a Chief invected of the second thereon three Martlets of the first.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours between two Gull's Wings Azure a Saxon Crown Gules.

Motto 'TO EXCEL'.
Granted 10th April 1935, to the Bognor Regis Urban District Council.

bognor tc arms

The blue field and the gold pile represent the sea and the sands, and the inverted chief the sea wall. The martlets refer to the old kingdom and present county of Sussex, and the crowns commemorate both the ancient kingdom and the sojourn at Bognor of King George V during his recovery from a grave illness in 1929, when the place earned the suffix 'Regis'.
The gull's wings are a further reference to the sea. Before arms were officially obtained, the UDC used a device in­cluding the arms of Sir Richard Hotham, who in the eighteenth century attempted to popularize Bognor by the name ' Hothampton'. The motto previously used by the UDC was 'ACTION'.


BURGESS HILL TOWN COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Per fesse Azure and Gules masoned Argent in chief a two-handled Vase Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules upon a Hillock Vert charged with the Wheel of a Potter's Wheel a Martlet Or.

Motto 'CONSILIO ET PRUDENTIA' - By wisdom and prudence.
Granted 14th August 1953, to the Burgess Hill Urban District Council.

burgess hill tc arms

The wall and vase represent the clay products of bricks and pottery, from which traditional industries the origin of the town can be traced.
Above is a grassy hillock indicative of the local scenery and commemorating the fact that Burgess Hill was formerly known as St. John's Common. The potter's wheel on the hillock again refers to the old pottery industry. The martlet represents the arms of six gold martlets which were those of the old kingdom of the South Saxons, and later used by both of the Sussex County Councils.


CHICHESTER CITY COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent Guttée-de-Sang on a Chief Gules a Lion passant guardant Or.

Granted 14th August 1570, to the former Borough. The chief is shown indented in an earlier Visiation record.

chichester city arms

No further information.


CRANLEIGH PARISH COUNCIL (SURREY)

*ARMS: Or on the Chevron Azure between three Maple Leaves Gules three Bezant a Chief chequy of the first and second fimbriated Gules.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours two Cranes reguardant respectant each resting the interior leg on a Basket Or.

Motto 'CRANLEIGH CARITATEM HABET ' - Cranleigh has charity or Cranleigh Cares.
Granted 10th January 2007.

cranleigh pc arms

The blue and gold chief is derived from the arms of the De Warrene family, Earls of Surrey and goes back to at least 1300. The three maple leaves represent the countryside, the Acer Rubrum growing in the High Street and the village's links with Canada. The three bezants, on the chevron, are symbols of St Nicolas, to whom the parish church is dedicated. He represents generosity, care and kindness.
The two cranes refer to the name of the village. They are shown looking backwards to the past as a reminder of where we have come from, and forward to the future but guarding the task at hand as they hold their foot on a basket.


EAST GRINSTEAD TOWN COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Vert a Pallet Argent surmounted of a Sun rising issuant from the base Or on a Chief of the last an Ash Tree couped proper enfiled by an Ancient Crown Gules between a Hammer Sable and a Sword in its scabbard also Gules garnished also Argent.
CREST: Issuant from a Circlet Or charged with three Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper a Plume of five Ostrich Feathers Azure the quills Gold; Mantled Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'PRATIS PRAESTO VIRENTIBUS' - Amid green meadows I proudly stand.
Granted 9th September 1955, to the East Grinstead Urban District Council.

east grinstead tc arms

The green background refers to the first syllable of 'Grinstead' and therefore the derivation of the name meaning 'Green Place'. The white line represents the meridan of Green­wich running through the town and the rising sun 'East'. The hammer is to recall the local iron industry, the sword the Assizes (lost to the town in 1799) and the ash tree Ashdown Forest, with a crown because it was royal property.
In 1572 Thomas Cure, Member of Parliament for the former Borough, presented a seal: five blue ostrich feathers with gold tips, his initials and those of the Duchy of Lancaster, of which the town was part. The Borough was disenfranchised in 1832 and the device used by the Urban District Council before the arms the current arms were granted. The feathers are here repeated, with three red roses of the house of Lan­caster. In the past the red rose of Lancaster surmounted by a ducal coronet has also been attributed to the town.


FARNHAM TOWN COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Vert a Castle with three towers Or on a Chief Argent a Mitre of the first garnished of the second between a Sprig of Oak and a Sprig of Hop both fructed of the field.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours, in front of a Stag's Head affrontée proper issuant from six Ears of Wheat fesswise three to the dexter and three to the sinister Or a stone headed Axe also proper and a Pastoral Staff Gold in saltire.

Motto 'BY WORTH'.
Granted 11th October 1950, to the Farnham Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

farnham tc arms

The castle represents the stronghold built at Farnham in the twelfth century by Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester, and the mitre and pastoral staff allude to the town's long associations with the Sees of Winchester and Guildford. The green field, the stag's head, and the oak refer to the parks and woodlands of the district. The oak also links to the arms of the County Council.
The ears of wheat stand for agriculture, and the sprig of hops for produce for which Farnham was formerly famous. The stone axe alludes to the prehistoric antiquities of the district.
The motto is derived from the name of John Byworth, one of the town's benefactors. He was a clothier and presented the town in 1623 with the "Byworth Cup".


FOLKESTONE TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Or on Water barry wavy in base proper an ancient Ship with four Men's Heads therein apparent as represented on the ancient Seal of the Borough of Folkestone also proper on a Chief per pale Gules and Azure a demi Lion passant guardant dimidiated with the Hull of a Ship Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a demi double-headed Eagle displayed Sable beaked Or charged on the breast with a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper dimidiated with a Fleur-de-Lys Gold and on each wing with a Ducal Coronet also Gold.
On the dexter side a figure representing St. Eanswyth proper crowned with an ancient Crown and holding in the exterior hand a Pastoral Staff Or and on the sinister side a figure representing William Harvey the physician also proper holding in the exterior hand a Heart Gules.

Motto 'SALUBRITAS ET AMOENITAS' - Heathiness and Delightfulness.
Granted 25th July 1958, to the Folkestone Borough Council. Transferred by Royal Licence and exemplified by certificate dated 30th November 2007.

folkestone tc arms

The vessel and crew are derived from that depicted on the ancient seal. The lion joined to a ship's hull refers to the town's connection to the Cinque Ports, it being a corporate member of Dover.
The black double headed eagle is from the attributed arms of Julius Caesar, who according to legend landed near Folkestone.
The supporters are St Eanswyth, the daughter of King Eadbald, and the founder Abbess of the first Nunnery in England, which was established at Folkestone. The other is Dr William Harvey who discovered the circulation of the blood who was born in Folkestone.


GODALMING TOWN COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Sable a Woolpack Argent on a Chief of the last a Rose of the first barbed and seed proper between two Escocheons also Gules that on the dexter charged with a Fesse dancetty between two Crosses patty in pale of the third and that on the sinister charged with three Pears in bend leafed and slipped proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Mount thereon a Ram statant holding in the mouth a Pear leafed and slipped all proper suspended from the neck by a Ribbon Gules an Escocheon Or charged with a Pair of Shears erect points upwards also proper.

Motto 'LIBERA DEINDE FIDELIS' - Faithful because free.
Granted 8th June 1893, to the Goldalming Borough Council. Transferred by Order in Council 16th April 1975 and exemplified by the Kings of Arms 10th December 1975.

goldalming tc arms

The woolpack, taken from an earlier seal, indicates the subsistance of the Town upon the woollen industry for several centuries. The rose indicates that the first Borough Charter was granted in Tudor times, in 1575 during the reign of Elizabeth I. The three pears, are a punning rubus in reference to the Borough's first Warden John Perrier, a clothier. The other shield is said to refer to Sir George More of Loseley, who held the Manor of Godalming from 1601 after it passed from royal hands. However the shield bears no resemblance to the arms of More, and it seems likely that this shield was originally intended to represent Jocelyn de Bohun, Bishop of Salisbury in 1157, when the holding of Rectory Manor by the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury was confirmed. Unfortunately, this Bishop Jocelyn has been confused with another man with a similar name, Jocelyn de Bailleul, whose arms may be regarded as having some resemblance to the device used in the Godalming arms.
The crest is a further reference to the woollen industry and John Perrier


HASLEMERE TOWN COUNCIL (SURREY)

ARMS: Per chevron Purpure and Sable on a Chevron Or between in chief two Hinds' Heads erased and in base an Acorn slipped and leaved Argent a Fountain between two Hazel leaves proper.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a demi-Heraldic Antelope Argent collard Azure supporting a Beacon Sable fired proper, Mantled Purpure doubled Or.

Motto 'VITA MUSIS GRATIOR' - Life is more satisfying through the muses or arts.
Granted 9th December 1959, to the Haslemere Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

haslemere tc arms

The shield forms a kind of heraldic map, with Haslemere between Hindhead and Blackdown. The chevron indicates the hilly situation of the area and resembles a gable and thus denotes a residential area, it also recalls the chevron-like pattern characteristic of Haslemere pottery. The two hazel leaves and the heraldic fountain suggests the name Haslemere, while above the hinds' heads on purple, suggest the heathery lands of the Hindhead area. Below the black "hill" suggests Blackdown, with the sprig of oak from the arms of the Surrey County Council, it is also the National Trust's emblem, a reminder that the Trust owns much local land.
The gold and purple of the wreath suggest the local abundance of heather and gorse and are also indicative of local Royal patronage. The mural crown is a symbol of local government and refers here to Haslemere's former borough status. The white antelope derived from the crest of the Mores of Loseley who held the Manor of Godalming (which included Haslemere) after the Bishops of Salisbury, who are also represented on the crest by a blue collar. The beacon is a reference to Beacon Hill and a symbol of the iron industry that was once so active in this area.
The motto reflects the many cultural activities of the town and its many links with famous artists, authors, poets and musicians.


HENFIELD PARISH COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent on a Bend cottised between in chief two Keys in saltire the bows downward tied by a Cord and in base a Pelican in her Piety Gules three Bezants.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules upon the top of a Thorn Bush a Golden Oriole wings displayed and addorsed grasping with the dexter claw a Sprig of Thorn issuing from the bush and fructed at the top with two Berries all proper.

Motto 'DOMINE SALVA NOS' - Lord save us.
Granted 10th February 1992.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

henfield pc arms

The arms are based on that of the Bysshopp family of Henfield, among whom were a number of Postmasters General of the United Kingdom, Henry Bysshopp (the first Postmaster General - 1606-1692) introduced the first postmark in 1661. The keys of St Peter refer to the dedication of the Church or England parish church. The pelican is part of the emblems of Corpus Christi College, Oxford and Cambridge and refers to the dedication of the Catholic church in Henfield to Corpus Christi.
The golden oriole refers to William Borrer 1781 - 1862, a famous botanist who collected over 6,600 specimens, and who recorded sighting fourteen golden orioles on a hawthorn bush in Henfield.
The motto from Matthew 8:25, is at the request of the Reverend Mark Elvins, priest of Corpus Christi Church in Henfield whose idea it first was - and who very kindly and generously paid for the application process to the College of Arms. It was a favourite motto of his.


LEWES TOWN COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Checky Or and Azure a sinister Quarter Gules semée of Cross-Crosslets Argent thereon a Lion rampant Or.

Recorded without tinctures at the Visitation of 1634. Certified as above by Kings' of Arms Certificate 10th June 1963, to the Borough of Lewes. Also Certified with the lion also Argent by York Herald 19th November 1894.

lewes tc arms

The arms appear on a 15th century seal. The gold and blue chequers are from the arms of the the Warennes, Earls of Surrey, who held the Barony of Lewes. The gold lion on red in the quarter is from the arms of a Fitzalan family. Gale Pedrick, in his book Borough Seals, puts forward the theory that the lion was derived from the arms of the Mowbray family, which may explain the lion being coloured silver in some representations. The cross-crosslets allude to the former Cluniac Priory of St. Pancras at Lewes.


LITTLEHAMPTON TOWN COUNCIL (W SUSSEX)

ARMS: Per chevron engrailed Azure and Argent in chief a Martlet volant between two Cross-crosslets fitchée of the second and in base on water barry wavy proper a Lymphad Sable.

Motto 'PROGRESS'.
Granted 29th July 1935, to the Littlehampton Urban District Council.

littlehampton tc arms

The martlet refers to Sussex and the crosslets are from the arms of the Duke of Norfolk. The ship represents the Port of Littlehampton.


LYDD TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Azure on Water in base proper to the dexter a representation of a Church with Tower and Spire thereon a forked Pennon flying to the dexter Argent and to the sinister an Ancient Ship with one mast sail furled passing behind the Church on the stern a Man blowing a Horn all Or a Canton also Argent charged with a Cross between four Lions rampant Gules.

Recorded at the Visitation of 1574 (partially tricked) and in 1619 (almost fully tricked).

Used with permission, do not reproduce. Copyright Reserved.

lydd tc seal

The arms are a development of a 13th century seal (shown below). There is little doubt that the building represents the Church of All Saints, preserving its appearance as it stood at an earlier date. Lydd at one time a corporate member of the Cinque Port of Romney, formerly stood upon an island, but now lies three miles from the sea. The ship therefore has only an historic significance. What is a canton in the arms is, in the seal, a shield hanging from a hook. The lions were probably derived from the Royal Arms, another suggestion is that the shield was originally meant to show the arms of Hainault in honour of Queen Philippa. Edward III married Philippa of Hainault in 1327.


RAMSGATE TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Quarterly Gules and Azure a Cross parted and fretty Agent between a Horse rampant of the last in the first quater a demi Lion passant guardant of the third conjoined to the Hulk of a Ship Or in the second a Dolphin naiant proper in the third and a Lymphad also Or in the fourth.
CREST: Issuant from a Naval Crown Or a Pierhead thereon a Lighthouse both proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Lifeboatman and on the sinister side a Coastguard holding in the exterior hand a Telescope all proper.

Motto 'SALUS NAUFRAGIS SALUS AEGRIS' - Safety to the shipwrecked, health to the sick.
Arms and crest granted 23rd July 1884, and supporters granted 2nd November 1935, to the Ramsgate Borough Council. Unsure if these have been officially transferred to the Town Council.

ramsgate tc arms

The white horse represents Kent and the lion joined to a ship's hull is from the arms of the Cinque Ports, Ramsgate being a member of Sandwich. The dolphin, ship, naval crown and lighthouse are appropriate to a seaside resort and port.
The supportes were adopted to show Ramsgate's association with the sea through the Royal Harbour since 1760.


SANDWICH TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)
Link to Sandwich Web Site

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure three demi-Lions passant guardant in pale Or conjoined with as many sterns of demi-Ships Argent.

Recorded at the Visitation 1574.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

sandwich tc arms

The arms are almost identical to those of the Confederation of the Cinque Ports, where the hulls are usually shown gold. The arms probably date from the 13th century and are the best known example of the earliest effort made to include two arms in one shield by "dimidiation".


SEAFORD TOWN COUNCIL (E SUSSEX)

ARMS: Argent on Water barry wavy a Lymphad sailing to the sinister proper Pennons flying Gules a Chief per pale of the last and or thereon to the dexter two demi-Lions passant guardant Gold conjoined with as many Sterns of Ships of the field in pale and to the sinister an Eagle displayed Sable.

Motto 'E VENTIS VIRES' - From the wind, strength.
Granted 18th April 1953, to the Seaford Urban District Council. Transferred by Warrant 30th May 2001.

Images courtesy of The Heraldry Society.

seaford tc arms

The lymphad or ancient ship is similar to one on Seaford’s original corporation seal, a reminder of the town’s former status as a port. The "lion-hulks" (half lion and half ship) appear in the arms or badges of many Cinque Ports member towns, and here serves as a reminder that Seaford for some hundreds of years was associated with the group as a “limb” of Hastings. The eagle, also represented on the old town seal, comes from the arms of the d'Aquila family who owned land hereabouts in medieval times.


SEVENOAKS TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Gules on a Pall Azure fimbriated Argent seven Acorns Or.
CREST: Out of a Circlet Argent charged with eight Lozenges throughout Gules a demi Horse supporting a Lance erect Argent tipped Or entwined about with a Branch of Vine fructed proper; Mantled Gules doubled Or.
BADGE: An Estoile of seven rays Argent surmounted by seven Acorns their stalks conjoined Or.

Motto 'FLOREANT SEPTEM QUERCUS' - May the seven oaks flourish.
Arms and crest granted 3rd December 1964, badge granted 20th March 1970, to the Sevenoaks Urban District Council. Transferred by Order made 16th April 1975.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

sevenoaks tc arms
sevenoaks badge
Badge

The seven golden acorns refer to the name sevenoaks and were previously used on the unofficial arms used by the Council. Its design was very similar to the arms believed to have been borne by William Sevenoke, the founder of Sevenoaks School, in the 15th century and still used by that school as "Founder's Arms". The blue Y-shaped pall is suggested by the arms of the Archbishops of Canterbury, who held the Manor of Sevenoaks as part of that of Otford. It also represents the the road junction, which was a major factor in the development of the town. The colours of gold and red are also the main colours of the arms of the Sackville family, who owned Knole House in Sevenoaks for many centuries.
The silver circlet with red lozenges are taken from the arms of Bosville, a notable local family. The white horse is from the arms attributed to the ancient Kingdom of Kent and now borne by the Kent County Council. The lance is similar to those in the crest of the Amherst family and the vine is a reference to the historic Vines cricket ground in Sevenoaks and is also said to suggest another local family, Lambard, who owned Vine Court.
The badge conbines the seven golden acorns from the arms with a silver estoile, from the crest of the Sackville family. Here the rays are increased to seven to fit with the acorns.


SOUTHBOROUGH TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Per chevron Gules and Or in chief two Sprigs of Broom stalked leaved and flowered of the last and in base an Oak tree fructed and eradicated proper on a Chief Gold a Torteau between two Billets fessewise of the first.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Chaplet of Oak Leaves Or a Ram's Head Sable.

Motto 'PROPRIA TUEMUR' - We look after what is ours.
Granted 14th December 1953, to the Southborough Urban District Council.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

southborough tc arms

The tree recalls the former 'Bounds Oak' on the Great Bounds Estate, the site of a former historical mansion and the broom refers to the derivation of the place name High Brooms. The red roundel and billets refer to the cricket ball industry, long associated with Southborough, and the brick making industry which led to the growth of High Brooms.
The ram's head represents the old weaving industry.


TENTERDEN TOWN COUNCIL (KENT)

ARMS: Gules in base Waves of the Sea proper and thereon a Ship of three masts Or the sail on the foremast furled the mainsail per pale Gules and Azure thereon three demi Lions passant guardant Or conjoined to as many Hulks of Ships also Argent the mizzen charged with the Arms Argent on a Bend Sable between four Lions' Heads erased Gules three Mullets of six points Or.

Recorded without tinctures at the Visitation of 1574, and with tinctures at the Visitation of 1619.

Used with permission, do not reproduce.

tenterden arms

The arms on the mainsail are those of the Cinque Ports (but with the ships' hulls coloured silver), Tenterden being a member of the Port of Rye. A ship bearing these arms on its sail and a banner of St George at the stem stands on the fifteenth-century aeal of Tenterden. On the reverse of the same seal, beneath a figure of St Mildred, the Patron of the town, is a shield bearing the arms which appear on the mizzen of the ship in the town arms. These are the arms of the Pillesden or Pitlesden family, one of whom was the first Bailiff of Tenterden.


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