BERKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL (former)

ARMS: Azure two Lions pas­sant guardant in pale Or a Bordure embattled Ermine.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert a Stag at gaze Or in front of an Oak Tree fructed proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Gules gorged with an ancient Crown Or and charged on the shoulder with a Tudor Rose proper and on the sinister side a Horse Argent gorged with a like Crown pendent therefrom a Bezant charged with a Pile Sable.

Arms and Crest [the stag argent] granted 18th July 1947. Crest changed and supporters granted 7th April 1961.

The former Berkshire County Council was created in 1889. In 1974 it was abolished and a large area around Abingdon and the Vale of the White Horse became part of Oxfordshire while Slough, which had been within Buckinghamshire, became part of Berkshire.

berkshire former cc arms

The two Royal Lions are appropriate because Berkshire is a Royal County, a privilege is unique among shire counties. They are derived from the arms attributed to the Norman kings and have association with Reading Abbey, which was founded by Henry I. The embattled border to the shield is intended to represent the castles of the County, of which Windsor is the best known survivor.
The crest is based upon the badge of the old Royal Berkshire Militia, and there is a tradition that a banner with this symbol, or one similar, was carried by the men of Berkshire at the Battle of Agincourt. The stag under the oak tree is assumed to represent the stags and oaks of Windsor Forest, which gave royal sport to the Saxon and Norman kings. William I, who had an eye for good hunting country when he chose Windsor for his residence and began its famous Castle.
The Red Lion Supporter is another Royal symbol, and the Tudor Rose on the Lion's collar, a Royal asso­ciation with Windsor Castle. The White Horse is a reference is to the historic carving in the chalk of a great White Horse on the top of the Downs near Uffington. The horse has a pendant with a wedge shape upon it; this shape is known in heraldry as a "pile" and its inclusion here tells in punning form of the atomic pile at the Atomic Energy Research Establishment at Harwell.


BERKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL (later)

ARMS: Azure two Lions passant guardant in pale each crowned with an ancient Crown Or within a Bordure embattled Ermine.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert within a Mural Crown Ermine a Stag at gaze Or in front of a hollow Oak Tree leaved and fructed proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Gules gorged with an ancient Crown Or charged on the shoulder with a Tudor Rose proper and on the sinister side a Horse Sable gorged with a like crown pendant therefrom a Mullet of six points Gold.

Granted 1974.

The later Berkshire County Council was created in 1974. On 1st April 1998 it was abolished and the districts became unitary authorities.

berkshire later cc arms

The arms were based very much upon the former Berkshire Arms. The principal change was the substitution of a Black Horse for a White Horse as the right-hand supporter, the White Horse representing the White Horse of Uffington which is no longer in the county. The Black Horse represents the county's considerable connections with horse-racing, there being a reference in old county histories to the ancient native horses of Berkshire being black. The six-pointed star on the collar, refers to the six borough and districts in the county, and also to the close association of Slough with the celebrated astronomer Sir William Herschel.


CAMBRIDGESHIRE AND ISLE OF ELY COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Or a double Tressure flory counterflory Gules over all on a Bend wavy Azure three [open] Crowns Or; the shield ensigned with a Mural Crown Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Great Bustard proper the exterior leg resting on a closed Book Gules garnished Or.
BADGE: Within an Annulet issuant there­from four Fleurs-de-Lys in cross an open Crown Or.

Motto 'SAPIENTES SIMUS' - Let us be men of understanding.
Granted 1st September 1965.

cambridgeshire and isle of ely cc arms

The wavy blue band across the shield refers to the River Cam, which apart from being a geographical feature was for long important as a trade route and a source of prosperity. The three golden crowns are from the of arms of the Isle of Ely CC. Forming a border on the shield are double lines set with fleurs-de-lis; this is derived from the Royal Arms of Scotland because the Earldom of the shire was held by Kings of Scotland in the twelfth century. Above the shield is a mural crown, a common symbol of civic government.
The two supporting birds are Great Bustards, now extinct in Britain. It is claimed that this county formed their last English habitat; it is interesting to note that Wiltshire also claims the last associations with these magnificent birds and shows one in its Arms. Each bird stands on a book as an allusion to the University of Cambridge.
The motto applies both to the community attitude of the area and to the significance of the part played by education throughout it.


CLEVELAND COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent a Lion rampant Azure crowned Or and gorged with a Collar compony Ermine and Or breathing Flames proper on a Chief wavy Azure on a Pale Sable fimbriated between on the dexter a Cogwheel and on the sinister a voided Hexagon Argent an ancient Ship sails furled pennons flying Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours on a Grassy Mount an Anchor proper between two Estoiles Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Hart Or and on the sinister side a Cleveland Bay Horse proper both gorged with a Collar compony Ermine and Azure and resting their interior hind hooves on three Ingots of Steel proper the whole upon a Compartment per pale of a Grassy Mount and Waves of the Sea proper.
BADGE A Roundel Azure thereon a Pile throughout Argent charged with a Lion as in the Arms.

Motto 'ENDEAVOUR'.
Granted 10th December 1974.

The County of Cleveland was formed in 1974 from the Hartlepool County Borough, the Teesside County Borough, the south-eastern part of the County of Durham and the north-eastern part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. It was abolished in 1996.

cleveland cc arms
cleveland badge
Badge

The blue lion is from the arms of the Brus family who, following the Norman Conquest, were given substantial lands in what is now Cleveland, and its collar and crown are similar to those in the heraldry of the Dukes of Cleveland. Charles II created Barbara Villiers Duchess of Cleveland in 1670 and their illegitimate son became the first Duke upon the death of his mother in 1709. The flames symbolize the energy industry generally, the ancient ship represents shipping, the cogwheel - engineering and the hexagon - the petro-chemical industry. The two vertical lines separating these symbols represent the railways and are a reminder that the World's first passenger railway had its terminus at Stockton-on-Tees.
The anchor resting on the grassy mount represents the sea and the golden 'estoiles' are identical to the polar stars in the arms of Captain Cook, but are blazoned as estoiles as they are not in a North-South position.
The supporters consist of a Hartlepool hart and a Cleveland Bay horse, each with a hoof resting on three steel ingots, representing the iron and steel industry.
The motto "Endeavour" was chosen not only for its obvious message but because Endeavour was the name of Captain James Cook's ship.


GREATER LONDON COUNCIL

ARMS: Barry wavy Argent and Azure on a Chief Gules a Saxon Crown Or.
BADGE: On a Roundel Argent fimbriated Gules charged with three Bars wavy Azure a Torteau thereon a Saxon Crown Or.

Arms granted 1st September 1965. Badge granted 5th October 1966.

Greater London was formed in 1965 from the County of London, most of the County of Middlesex, parts of the Counties of Essex, Hertfordshire, Surrey and Kent. In addition the County Bouroughs of Croydon, East Ham and West Ham.

glc arms
greater london badge
Badge

The arms combine the blue and white waves from the arms of the London County Council, where they represented the River Thames, with the Saxon corown from the arms of the Middlesex County Council.


GREATER MANCHESTER COUNTY COUNCIL

*ARMS: Gules ten Towers three two three two all within a Bordure embattled Or.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Lion Or supporting a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner of the Arms.
*SUPPORTERS: On either side a lion Or each surmounted on the shoulder by a Roundel Gules that to the dexter charged with an open Book and that to the sinister charged with a French Horn proper.
*BADGE: On a Roundel Gules ten Towers three two three two all within a Bordure embattled Or.

Motto 'EVER VIGILANT'.
Granted ?

Greater Manchester was formed in 1974 from the southern parts of Lancashire, the northern parts of Cheshire and a small part of the West Riding of Yorkshire. It was abolished in 1996.

Picture and information courtesy of James Buckley.

greater manchester cc arms
greater manchester badge
Badge

The ten gold towers on a red background represent the ten cities and boroughs within the County. The embattled bordure gives the idea of all ten districts contained in the one County.
The crest is simply an English lion holding a banner of the Arms.
The supporters repeat the English lion of the crest, but are differenced by red roundels. The French horn represents music and culture, and the open book represents learning and learning and academic life.


HUNTINGDONSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
See Huntingdonshire District Council.

ISLE OF ELY COUNTY COUNCIL

*ARMS: Argent three Bars wavy Azure a Pile Gules charged with three open Crowns Or.
*CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure a dexter cubit Arm the wrist charged with the Wake Knot proper the hand grasping a Trident Or entwined by an Eel also proper.

Granted 1st May 1931.

The Isle of Ely CC was formed in 1889. It was abolished in 1965 and merged with Cambridgeshire CC to form Cambridgeshire and the Isle of Ely, which in turn was abolished in 1974.

isle of ely cc arms

The three gold crowns on red are from the arms of the See of Ely, which were used by the County Council before they obtained arms of their own. They refer particularly to St Etheldreda, the foundress of the religious house which has become the Cathedral. Etheldreda was a lady of the royal house of East Anglia to which, long after its extinction, the heralds assigned for arms three gold crowns on blue. The blue and white waves refer to the fens and many local waterways.
The knot refers to Hereward the Wake, but there is no evidence to support the tradition that Hereward was the ancestor of the family named Wake, but he has been credited with their knot. The eel refers to the supposed derivation of the name from 'eel isle', stated by Bede to be due to 'the great plenty of eels taken in those marshes'.


MERSEYSIDE METROPOLITAN COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure three Bendlets wavy Argent between six Mural Crowns three and three conjoined in pile Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours rising from a Wreath of Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper and Garbs Or placed alternately a Cormorant wings displayed holding in the beak a Branch of Seaweed called Laver proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Sea Horse proper gorged with a Wreath of Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper and on the sinister side a Sea Lion proper gorged with a Wreath of Garbs Or each supporting a Trident Or all upon a Compartment a Water barry wavy Argent and Azure.
BADGE: On a Roundel Azure three Mural Crowns conjoined in pile Or in base two Barrulets wavy Argent.

Motto 'UNITY IN THE SERVICE OF ALL'.

The County of Merseyide was formed in 1974 from the City of Liverpool, the south western part of Lancashire and the Wirral area of Cheshire. It was abolished in 1986?.

merseyside cc arms
merseyside badge
Badge

The white and blue waves refer to the River Mersey and the six mural crowns, being civic emblems, to the six constituent districts.
The red roses and sheaves are emblems of Lancashire and Cheshire respectively, both emblems appeared in the arms and dvices numerous former local authorites in the area. The cormorant or liver bird is from the arms of the City of Liverpool.
The supporters combine national emblems with those of the sea.


SOUTH YORKSHIRE METROPOLITAN COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Sable a Pile throughout barry dancetty Argent and Gules over all a Pile reversed throughout counterchanged in the Sable a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper between two like Roses dimidiated and issuing from the flanks.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Gules a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper dimidiating a Bezant.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Horse guardant Or crined and unguled Sable supporting with the dexter forehoof a Hoe Gules sinister a Lion guardant Sable maned Or supporting a Miner's Pick-Axe Gules.

Motto 'EACH SHALL STRIVE FOR THE WELFARE OF ALL'.
Granted 1978.

The County of South Yorkshire was abolished in 1986.

Picture and information courtesy of Laurence Jones.

south yorkshire cc arms

The black diamonds on the shield recall the mining industry and the zig-zag pattern, coloured red and white, alludes to the heat processing of steel. The white rose of York appears in the arms and is repeated in the crest, here united with a gold coin which symbolises the riches of South Yorkshire - moral, intellectual and commercial. The crest rises from a mural crown, sign of civic authority.
The horse with the hoe is refers to agriculture and the black lion grasping the pick-axe represents the strength and courage of the miner. Both implements are coloured red to remind us that the County's natural riches must sometimes be bought with blood.


WEST YORKSHIRE METROPOLITAN COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Or two Piles Azure [over all] a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Mural Crown Or standing thereon a Lion rampant guardant per fess Gules and Tenne crowned Or bearing in its forepaws a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Lion rampant guardant per fess Gules and Sable armed and langued Azure crowned and charged on the shoulder with a Sun in splendour Or sinister a Lion rampant guardant per fess Tenne and Vert armed and langued Gules crowned Or charged on the shoulder with a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper, the whole upon a Compartment representing the Pennine Hills.

Motto 'BY EFFORT ACHIEVE'.
Granted ?.

Picture courtesy of Dennis Towner.

west yorkshire cc arms

The two 'piles' on the shield form a letter W the initial of West and the white rose is for Yorkshire, thus representing heraldically the name of County. The shield is divided into five parts which stand for the five districts, as do the petals of the rose.
The lion holds in his keeping the emblem of Yorkshire, the white rose of York, and the mural crown is appropriate to the dignity of the County.
The two lions, as in the crest, are British emblems, and long used in many arms in Yorkshire. They are divided horizontally in colour to symbolize the new District structure of local government, and also the mid-way position of the County in Britain. The left hand lion is in colours representing industry, and has on its shoulder the sun, source of all energy. The right hand lion is in colours representing agriculture, and it bears a white rose for the countryside. The base represents the Pennine hills, so much a feature of the County.


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