WEST RIDING COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Ermine a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper and en Soleil Or on a Chief Gules three Roses of the second barbed Vert seeded Gold; the whole ensigned by a Mural Crown Or.
BADGE: A Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper ensigned with a Mural Crown Or.
STANDARD: Gules the Bands Argent insribed Sable fringed ARgent and Gules.

Motto 'AUDI CONSILIUM' - Heed consel.
Granted 2nd February 1927.

west riding cc arms

The white roses are a symbol of Yorkshire, ultimately derived from the badge of the House of York. The three roses on the red chief represent the three Ridings or "thirdings" into which Yorshire was devided. The other rose is shown en Soleil, a device adopted by the Yorkist King Edward IV, when he reached the throne after the Battle of Towton.


BAILDON URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert three Chevronels and in chief a Fleece Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Skylark holding in the beak a Sprig of Gorse slipped and flowered proper.

Motto 'SURGAMUS ERGO STRENUE' - Let us arise with vigour.
Granted 30th September 1952.

Incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

baildon udc arms

The green field and golden fleece allude to the rearing for wool of sheep on the Baildon Moorlands. The golden fleece formed an integral part of Baildon's unofficial badge and which badge has been used for very many years. The three chevronels point to the fact that Baildon is a three-tier Town.
The skylark with a sprig of gorse in its beak alludes to the Moors in and surrounding Baildon.
The motto would have appealed to the civic pride of the hillmen of Baildon and appears to be taken from a hymn attributed to St. Ambrose.


BINGLEY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Argent and Vert in chief two Trefoils slipped Sable and in base a Fleece Or on a Chief Gules a Millrind Gold between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Issuant from a Saxon Crown Or a Bear's Head Argent muzzled Gules; Mantled Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'OPES INDUSTRIA PARIT' - Industry begets plenty.
Granted 10th September 1956.

Incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

bingley udc arms

The black trefoils derive from the arms of the Bingley family, previously used by the UDC. The fleece and millrind allude to the woollen and engineering industries and the white roses are for Yorkshire.
The muzzled bear is also from the crest of the Bingley family, differenced by the addition of a Saxon crown.


BOWLAND RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert on a Pale Or between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper a Pale Sable thereon a Crozier Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Stag's Head couped Or gorged with a Collar affixed thereto a Chain reflexed round the neck Sable the Collar charged with three Mullets Gold.

Motto 'I WILL LIFT UP MINE EYES'.
Granted 9th April 1954.

bowland rdc arms

The green background represents the Ribble Valley and the Forest of Bowland. The gold crosier recalls Sawley Abbey, indicating the important part it played in the social and economic life of the district. The white roses represent Yorkshire.
The stag's head recalls the stags in the arms of the Parkers of Browsholme and the Lister, Barons Ribblesdale, whose gold mullets on black provide the stag's collar.


BRADFORD CITY & COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure on a Chevron engrailed between three Bugle Horns stringed Or a Well Sable .
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Boar's Head [sans tongue] erased Or in front of the Trunk of a Tree sprouting proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Ram Sable horned Or and gorged with a Wreath of White Roses proper and on the sinister side an Angola Goat Argent horned Or and gorged with a Collar Gules thereon three Roses also Argent.
BADGE: A Ram's Head caboshed Argent horned and crowned with a Civic [ = mural] Crown Or.
STANDARD: Per fesse Gules and Azure the bands and lettering Or fringed of the Colours.

Motto 'LABOR OMNIA VINCIT' - Labour overcomes all things.
Arms and crest granted 18th October 1847. Supporters granted 31st December 1907. Badge and standard granted 31st January 1908.

Incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

bradford cbc arms

The bugles recall the ancient and annual custom of blowing the horn and holding a dog on St. Martin's day in the forenoon, in the Market Place at Bradford. This commemorates part of the service which John Northrop of Manningham owed to John of Gaunt for his lands.
The boar's head refers to the legend of the boar of Cliffe Wood. This was a ferocious boar that lived in the wood on the outskirts of Bradford, and frequently drank from a well in the wood (later called Boar's Well, and represented in the arms) . The boar terrorized the populace and caused much damage to land and property; so much so that the Lord of the Manor offered a reward for anyone brave enough to slay the boar and bring its head to the Manor House. A youth up the Lord's offer, and lay in wait near the well, ready to catch his quarry and thereby claim his reward. The boar duly arrived, and was shot by the youth, who cut out the boar's tongue as proof of his victory and set off for the Manor House. A little time later, another man who had heard of the Lord's offer, was passing through the woods and saw the slain boar lying near the well. Thinking of the reward he would receive, he cut off the boar's head and he too set off for the Manor House. Arriving there before the true victor, he claimed his reward for having disposed of the ferocious creature, but was unable to account for the boar's absent tongue. The youth then arrived, explained the true circumstances of the defeat showing the boar's tongue as evidence of his veracity and received his rightful reward. In allusion to this legend the boar is shown without a tongue.
The black ram and white angora goat recall that the wool of these animal was used in the local industries. The roses refer to Yorkshire.


BRIGHOUSE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Or on a Pale Sable between two Roses in chief Gules barbed and seeded proper and as many Crescents in base of the second a Lion rampant of the first.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours the Battlements of a Tower Argent charged with two Crescents fessewise Sable thereon a Leopard's Face also Argent between two Roses Gules stalked and leaved proper.

Motto 'LABORE ET PRUDENTIA' - By labour and prudence.
Granted 28th March 1894.

Incorporated into the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in 1974.

brighouse bc arms

The Arms are derived from the crests of the Brighouse and Rastrick families who lived in the district in the seventeenth century. The gold lion and the black crescents come from the Brighouse family arms and the red roses are from the crest of the Rastrick family. It is unusual to see the inclusion of red roses on the arms of a Yorkshire Borough.


CASTLEFORD BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules on Water barry wavy in base proper a triple-towered Castle Or in chief two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Eagle Or gorged with a Collar Gules pendent therefrom a Miner's Lamp proper and charged on each wing with a Lacy Knot Sable.

Motto 'AUDACTER ET SINCERE' - Boldly and frankly.
Granted 3rd March 1952 to the Castleford Urban District Council.

Information and pictures from Wakefield Metropolitan District Council website.

castleford bc arms

The name of Castleford is indicated by the gold castle and the ford of white and blue waves upon the shield. The white roses indicate the situation of the town in the West Riding of Yorkshire.
The gold Roman eagle represents the fact that the town stands on the site of a Roman station and the a miner's safety lamp, alludes to the local coal-mining industry. On each wing of the eagle is the badge of the Laceys, Earls of Lincoln and Lords of the Honour in which Castleford used to lie.


DEWSBURY COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Chequey Or and Azure on a Chief engrailed Sable a Cross patonce of the first between two Owls Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Cross patonce fitchée Azure an Owl as in the Arms.

Motto 'DEUS NOSTER REFUGIUM ET VIRTUS' - God is our refuge and strength.
Granted 24th February 1893.

dewsbury cbc arms

The chequers are from the arms of the Earls de Warenne, the owls from the arms of the Savile family, and also appear in the arms of Leeds. The crosses represent the Copley family.
The motto is from Psalm xlvi.


DONCASTER COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules a Port between two Towers with Flags Argent the Portcullis raised Sable in chief a Saxon Crown Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Cushion Ermine a Lion sejant Or grasping between his paws a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner Azure fringed and tasselled Gold thereon upon Waves Argent ans Azure a Port between two Towers as in the Arms charged with the word DON in letters Sable.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion sejant Or holding in the mouth a Rose Argent barbed seeded leaved and slipped proper.

Motto 'COMFORT ET LIESSE' - Comfort and joy.
Granted 28th March 1927.

doncaster cbc arms

The arms and crest are based on unauthorised ones previously used, except that they differed by containing a Royal rather than a Saxon crown. The Saxon crown is appropriate inasmuch as in the reign of Edward the Confessor, Doncaster, then part of the Manor of Hexthorp, belonged to Earl Tostig. In the time of Henry I it passed into the royal hands.
The banner visually represents the name and the white roses refer to Yorkshire.


DONCASTER RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Sable and Vert a Fesse wavy Argent charge with another wavy Azure and surmounted by a Port between two Towers the portcullis raised proper in chief and in base a Rose of the third barbed and seeded also proper.

Granted 30th October 1957.

doncaster rdc arms

The black and green background represents the district's two main industries - coal mining in the west and agriculture in the east. The white and blue waves symbolise the River Don and the castle gateway is derived from the arms of the County Borough of Doncaster, together they express the name. The white roses of course refer to the district's location in Yorkshire.


FEATHERSTONE URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Quarterly Or and Azure a Cross quarterly Gules and Argent in the first quarter a Lion rampant Purpure in the second three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper in the third a Garb also Argent and in the fourth a Miner's Safety Lamp also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Rock an Ostrich Feather erect between two Battle-Axes in saltire all proper.

Motto 'CONCILIO ET ANIMIS ' - By counsel and courage.
Granted 23rd February 1955.

Picture from West Riding Civic Heraldry by R. Bretton.

featherstone udc arms

The purple lion, from the De Lacy arms, refers to the ownership of Old Featherstone by that family. The three white roses represent Yorkshire and the sheaf of corn and miner's safety lamp represent the two principal industries, agriculture and coal-mining. The only purpose of the cross is that of dividing the shield into four sections.
The ostrich feather and rock allude to the name Featherstone. The battle-axes are included as a reminder that battles were fought in the locality during the Civil War of 1641-49. In this connection, Langdale Sunderland, nephew of Sir Marmaduke Langdale, first Lord Langdale, raised a troop of cavalry during the siege of Pontetract Castle. His home, after the sale of his ancestral estates near Halifax - to pay the heavy fine imposed upon him for supporting King Charles I - was Ackton Hall, situate within the district. At his death in 1698 he was buried in Featherstone Church.


GOOLE BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Or a Lymphad sail set oars in action Sable flags flying to the dexter Gules on a Chief of the second three Swans Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Viking supporting in the exterior hand a Spear proper.

Motto 'ADVANCE'.
Granted 7th October 1933.

goole bc arms

The ship represents Goole's seafaring interests, past and present. The swans are from the arms of Selby Abbey, which was a considerable landholder inb the area before its dissolution.
The Viking supporters refer to the Norse sea-rovers who settled along the River Humber.


HALIFAX COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Chequy Or and Azure a Man's bearded Face affrontée [the eyes closed] surrounded by a Halo proper.
CREST: Issuant from a Saxon Crown Or a Mount Vert thereon a Paschal Lamb proper holding a Staff Gold flying therefrom a split Pennon Argent charged with a Cross Gules; Mantled Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a lion Or holding with the interior paw a Rose Argent barbed seeded stalked and leaved proper.

Motto 'EXCEPT THE LORD KEEP THE CITY'.
Granted 12th April 1948.

Incorporated into the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in 1974.

halifax cbc arms
halifax unofficial arms
Former unofficial arms

The arms are based upon an unofficial device (see left), in which the face on a gold and blue chequered shield was placed between the words 'halez' and 'fax'. The 'holy face' - an allusion to the name of the town - is that of St John the Baptist, to whom the parish church is dedicated. The chequers are from the arms of the Earls Warenne who held it in Norman times.
Another symbol of St John the Baptist is the Holy Lamb, because it was he who hailed Jesus as 'the Lamb of God' (John i. 29). On account of this symbol, St John the Baptist became the patron saint of the wool weavers' guilds of the Middle Ages. Halifax's principal industry was that of wool weaving, to which it owed its early prosperity, and accordingly dedicated its church to the appropriate saint. The crest therefore stands both for that dedication and for the industry of which Halifax is still an important centre. The Saxon crown denotes that the manor was held by Edward the Confessor.
The supporters are British lions holding the County emblem, a further indication of Halifax's situation.
The motto, from from Psalm 127:1, was previously used in its Latin form.


HEMSWORTH RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Sable on a Mount in base an Oak Tree proper fructed Or on a Chief Gules a Cross couped Gold between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded also proper.
CREST: Out of a Circlet Azure charged with a Crescent Argent between two Mullets of six points Or a Bull's Head Sable armed Gold; Mantled Sable doubled Or.

Motto 'CONSTANTER ET RECTE' - Steadfastly and justly.
Granted 12th October 1954.

Picture from West Riding Civic Heraldry by R. Bretton.

hemsworth rdc arms

The black background is an allusion to the local coal-mining industry and the oak tree on a green mount represents the rural portions of the district, especially Brierley Common and the famous "Old Adam" oak. The white roses on red denote a situation in Yorkshire, while the gold cross repre­sents the Wapentake of Osgoldcross being "Oswald's Gold Cross" from the ancient arms of Nostell Priory. The two roses can also be under­stood to have reference to the wapentakes of Strafford and Tickhill.
The crest has reference to Ackworth School and Archbishop Holgate's Hospital. The silver crescent and gold stars on the blue circlet are from the arms of the Governors of the Foundling Hos­pital, whose buildings became the school; the bull's head is from the arms of Archbishop Holgate.
The motto is part of that of the Warde-Aldam family of Frickley and Hooton Pagnell.


ILKLEY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
See Ilkley Parish Council.

KEIGHLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL
See Keighley Town Council.

KNOTTINGLEY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure issuant from Water barry wavy in base a Bridge of two arches proper in chief a Lacy Knot Or between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure a cubit Arm holding an ancient Glass Bottle proper.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA DIDAT' - Progress through industry.
Granted 15th December 1942.

Information and pictures from Wakefield Metropolitan District Council website.

knottingley udc arms

The water stands for the River Aire and the Knottingley-Goole canal. The bridge represents the Great North road, crossing the river at Ferrybridge. The white roses of Yorkshire represent the history of the town and the golden knot is the emblem of the De Lacy family, who once lived in this area.
The arm held aloft holding a bottle represents the glass industry of Knottingley.


MALTBY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent on a Chevron Gules between three Parrots Vert collared of the second a Mitre of the field on a Chief also Gules an open Book proper edged and bound Gold between two Roses also Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of eight Cog-Wheels in mesh set upon a Steel Rim proper a demi Lion Sable gorged with a Collar gemel dancetty Or and holding between the paws a Shuttle erect proper.

Motto 'PER LABOREM SCIENTIAM ARTEM' - Through hard work, knowledge and skill.
Granted 2nd June 1958.

maltby udc arms

The chevron with the abbot's mitre refers to Roche Abbey, its red back­ground being the field of the family of Richard de Busli who was co-founder of the Norman abbey. The three parrots are from the arms of the Earls of Scar­borough who succeeded the Viscounts Castleton as lords of the manor of Maltby in the early 18th century. The red chief, being derived from their arms, commemorates the Rollestons of Maltby Hall. The open book refers to the school founded by Viscount Castleton in 1714 and the school established by the Rev. George Rolleston in 1823. The two white roses of York representing the parishes of Maltby and Stainton, are from the arms of the West Riding County Council.
The crest represents the main local industries, displaying the black lion from the arms of the National Coal Board with a collar as a double M for the Maltby Main colliery. The textile trade is represented by the shuttle the lion holds, and he rises from what is a unique crown of meshed cogwheels signifying light engineering.
The motto is based on that of the Maltby Grammar School and emphasises that the accomplishments of the local manual, clerical and scientific workers are all of equal value.


MORLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent on a Fesse Gules between a Sprig of the Cotton-Tree slipped fructed and leaved proper between two Pellets in chief and a Pickaxe surmounted by a Spade in saltire in base Sable a Shuttle fessewise Or thread pendant of the first.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Ram's Head couped Argent a Shuttle fessewise proper thread pendant also Argent.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA OMNIA VINCIT' - Industry overcomes all things.
Granted 9th August 1887.

morley bc arms

The design refers entirely to local industries - wool, cotton and coal mining.


NIDDERDALE RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per chevron Vert and Or a Chevronel wavy per chevron wavy Argent and Azure between in chief two Garbs of the second and in base three Arrows one in pale and two in saltire points downward banded Gules on a Chief of the last an Apple slipped and leaved Gold between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Out of a Crown of Rays of Ancient Rome Or a Stag's Head proper; Mantled Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'THE NOBLEST MOTIVE IS TO SERVE'.
Granted 20th March 1959.

nidderdale rdc arms

The principal colours of green and gold, show the district as an agricultural one, a further indication being two golden wheatsheaves on the green. The gold base of the shield in the shape of a hill represents Claro Hill, the meeting place of the Claro Wapentake. The blue and white waves represents the Rivers Nidd and Ouse (the source of the latter is within the district). The sheaf of three red arrows stands for the Battle of Boroughbridge (1322) and also for the "Devil's Arrows", the three well-known large mono­liths at Boroughbridge. The white roses denote the situation in the West Riding of Yorkshire and the golden apple between them is a reminder of the famous Ribston pippin apples.
The stag's head represents the Forest of Knaresborough. It rises from a Roman Caesar's crown, tinctured gold, which has reference to the district's Roman associations — in particular the Roman remains at Aldborough and the Roman road therefrom to Tadcaster.


OSGOLDCROSS RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Cross Moline Or a Chief wavy Argent thereon on a Pale Sable between two Lions' Faces Gules a Ram's Head couped also Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of an Oak Tree proper fructed Or pendent from the branches an Escutcheon Ermine charged with a Saltire engrailed Gules three Roses Argent barbed and seeded also proper.

Motto 'AMOR ANGLIAE RUSTICAE' - Love of Rural England.
Granted 30th March 1955.

osgoldcross rdc arms

The green background of the shield is appropriate to a rural area and the gold cross moline alludes to the name of the district. Its form is that traditionally associated with some of the Saxon Kings, and refers generally to the pre-Conquest history of Osgoldcross. It also approximates to the type of cross worn by the Knights Templars and Knights Hospitallers, and recalls the connection of these Orders with Kellington and Whitley. The cross is also intended as a reference to Selby Abbey and Monk Fryston, and to the several fine churches in the district. The wavy line of the chief represents the rivers and canals running through the district. The lions' faces are from the hereldry of Thomas of Brotherton, Earl of Norfolk and Earl Marshal of England (son of Edward I), Ilbert de Lacy and other members of the De Lacy family, and also the Earl of Rosse. Accordingly they refer to the history of Brotherton, Birkin, Womersley, Stapleton and Darrington. The ram's head alludes to the family of Ramsden of Byram Park.
The oak tree alludes to the wooded areas of the district and the white roses to Yorkshire. The shield bears the arms of the ancient family Scargill of Stapleton.


OTLEY URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
See Otley Town Council.

PONTEFRACT BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fesse wavy Sable and barruly wavy Argent and Azure a quadrangular Castle in perspective only three of its four towers being visible on the dome of each tower Argent a Flagstaff proper and flying therefrom to the sinister a Banner Gules.

Motto 'POST MORTEM PATRIS PRO FILIO' - Held after the death of the Father for the Son or After the Father We are for the Son.
Arms recorded by Robert Glover, Somerset Herald, during his visitation of Yorkshire in 1584 and 1585, and a certified painting was obtained by the Corporation from the College of Arms in May 1931.

Information and pictures from Wakefield Metropolitan District Council website.

pontefract bc arms

The Borough of Pontefract received its Charter of Incorporation from Richard III in 1484. On a shield divided across the middle by a wavy line is a conventional representation in white of Pontefract Castle with a red banner flying from three towers. The Castle was built by Ilbert De Lacy, Lord of Pontefract in the time of William I and it became one of the mightiest fortresses in the North. The Castle was held by the Royalists during the Civil War and was destroyed by order of Parliament. The Water in the lower half of the shield presumably represents the Castle Moat, there being no river of any importance at Pontefract, even though the name of the town may be translated as "Broken Bridge".
The motto relates to the refusal of the garrison at Pontefract Castle to surrender the Castle when called upon so to do, following the execution of Charles I in 1649. It is taken from coins struck by the garrison and was adopted as the town's motto some time after the Restoration in the reign of Charles II.


PUDSEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent on a Chevron Vert between two Pairs of Shuttles saltirewise in chief and a Woolpack in base proper three Mullets pierced Or all within a Bordure engrailed Gules charged with eight Roses of the field.

Motto 'BE JUST AND FEAR NOT'.
Granted 10th January 1901.

pudsey bc arms

The chevron and pierced mullets are from the arms of the Pudsey family. The shuttles and woolpack allude to the chief local industry and the white roses are for Yorkshire.


ROTHERHAM COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert above two Bars wavy in base Argent a Bridge of three arches throughout proper in chief a Mitre between two Roses of the second.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Hand proper grasping a Caduceus erect Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag Or gorged with a Chain pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Sable charged with a Bee volant Gold.

Motto 'SIC VIRESCIT INDUSTRIA' - Thus industry flourishes.
Granted 22nd October 1947.

rotherham cbc arms

The green background, the silver mitre, and the gold stags, are derived from the arms and insignia of Thomas of Rotherham (1423-1500), Archbishop of York, who founded Jesus College, Rotherham and built part of the Church of All Saints. The bridge, like that on the unofficial device used before the arms were granted, represents the ancient bridge at Rotherham. It also refers to the Old Southwark Bridge, built by Rotherham iromasters, and the Bailey bridge, invented by a Rotherham man. The two silver wavy bars are for the rivers Rother and Don, at the junction of which the town is situated, and the white roses indicate the county.
The man's hand, naturally coloured, holding Mercury's golden staff represents commerce.
The golden bees typify an industrial town and the black chains around the stags' necks have reference to the town's chief industries of iron and brass founding. The black colour of the small shields is an allusion to the fact that Rotherham is the centre of a coal-mining district.
The motto was in earlier use by the Borough.


ROTHERHAM RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Stag trippant Or on a Chief Sable two Swords in saltire proper hilted and pommelled Gold between as many Roses Argent barbed and seeded also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Griffin Argent gorged with a Collar lozengy Argent and Gules pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Sable charged with a Chevron between three Leopards' Faces Or and holding between the claws a Cross patonce also Sable.

Motto 'INTENTO ANIMO' - With earnest mind.
Granted 20th June 1955.

rotherham rdc arms

The green background represents the ancient forest and the modern agricultural activities. The golden stag is an emblem of the forest and is also a link with the arms of the Rotherham CBC, which has two stags as supporters. The black chief with white roses suggests the South Yorkshire coalfield. The crossed swords are an emblem of the steel industry. They also appear in the arms of the Cutlers of Sheffield, for whom grindstones were provided from many of the local quarries. Thus the local coal, steel, quarrying and agriculture are all represented.
The gold and green colour of the mantling and wreath are those of the Sitwell family, which is connected with Whiston. The griffin is from the arms of the Marquesses and Earls of Rockingham and the Wentworths (of Hooton Roberts and Wentworth Woodhouse) whose shield hangs from a red and white patterned collar derived from the Fitzwilliam shield. The black cross is that of the Reresbys of Thrybergh.
The motto is derived from that of the Bosviles of Ravenfleld.


SILSDEN URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL
See Silsden Town Council.

SKIPTON URBAN DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Vert a Fleece Or between in chief two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper a Chief chequy Or and Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours A Wyvern sejant Gules supporting a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner barry of eight Or and also Gules thereon a Port between two Towers Argent.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA ET SPE' - Labour and hope.
Granted 12th October 1951.

skipton udc arms

The green background portrays the nature of the town's surroundings - countryside and agriculture and the fleece represents the town's close interest in agriculture and textiles, and is indicative of the origin of the name Skipton ("scip" or "sceap"). The checks are taken from the arms of the Clifford family, who had a profound influence on the life of Skipton in their time, and the roses are symbolic of Skipton as a Yorkshire town.
The wyvern is also from the crest of the Cliffords and the bars on the banner represents the de Romille family in whose arms it appeared. Robert de Romille is believed to have founded the Church and the Castle in the 11th century. The Castle is shown to indicate that Skipton is a Castle town.


SPENBOROUGH BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules a Lamb passant proper supporting a Staff Or flying therefrom a Pennon Argent charged with a Cross of the first in chief three Roses of the third barbed and seeded also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Lion rampant Purpure resting the sinister paw on an Escutcheon Argent charged with a Saltire Gules and a Label of five points Azure.

Motto 'INDUSTRY ENRICHES'.
Granted 5th September 1949, to the Spenborough Urban District Council .

spenborough udc arms

The lamb refers to the district's woollen industry and allied trades, and the roses refer to Yorkshire.
The purple lion is from the arms of the De Lacy family, Lords of the Honour of Pontefract. The smaller shield depicts the arms of the Nevilles of Liversedge..


TADCASTER RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fesse Vert and Sable on a Fesse wavy Argent between in chief a Garb between two Stalks of Barley and as many Swords both in saltire and in base a representation of the Head of a Roman Centurion's Standard with the letters SPQR thunderbolt laurel wreath and eagle displayed of Gold a Bar wavy Azure over all on the fesse a Mitre Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Unicorn's Head erased Gules armed and crined Or a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper; Mantled Vert lined argent.

Motto 'BY SERVICE LET US GOVERN'.
Granted April 15th 1954.

tadcaster rdc arms

The green at the head of the shield and the gold wheatsheaf represent the district's predominantly rural character. The black of the lower half refers to the mining in its southern portion. The golden ears of barley typify the town's well-known malting and brewing industries and the two gold swords relate to Towton where the famous battle, during the Wars of the Roses, was fought in 1461 and where more than 30,000 men were slain. The white and blue wavy bars represent the River Wharfe and the gold mitre alludes to Bishopthorpe, where since the 13th Century the palace of the Archbishops of York has been. The head of a Roman centurion's standard, also in gold, indicates that Tadcaster was founded by the Romans, who gave it the name Calcaria, and it became an important outpost to the military headquarters at York.
The red unicorn's head with golden horn and mane is from the arms of the Earls of Londesborough, lords of the manor of Tadcaster and the white rose is for the County of Yorkshire.


TODMORDEN BOROUGH COUNCIL
See Todmorden Town Council.

WAKEFIELD CITY AND COUNTY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Azure a Fleur-de-Lys Or fimbriated Ermine.

Granted 3rd March 1932.

Information and pictures from Wakefield Metropolitan District Council website.

wakefield cbc arms

The Arms used by the City of Wakefield have been for at least five centuries "Azure a Fleur-de-Lys Or" (a golden lily on a blue shield). These arms appear on a carved wooden boss on the Cathedral roof, which may be dated not later than 1470. Single fleur-de-lys appear on the frieze of the choir screen (1635) and also on the badge of the Wakefield Waits (1688). The Manor of Wakefield was bestowed by Edward III on his fifth son, Edmund of Langley, Duke of York, in 1347, who bore the Royal Arms of France and England. These arms thus became on all public documents the arms of Wakefield, superseding the "Checky Or and Azure" shield of the Warenne family, the former Lords of the Manor. It would seem that a kind of abridgment of these arms subsequently ensued, one golden fleur-de-lys only on an azure shield being adopted. These arms were never registered with the College of Heralds and were used without authority until in 1932 the City Council decided to apply for a formal grant of arms. This was obtained, when the former device was slightly varied by the addition of an ermine fimbriation to the fleur-de-lys.


WETHERBY RURAL DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent two Bars wavy Azure on a Chief Gules a Wether passant between two Ears of Wheat slipped and leaved Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Castle with two Towers each surmounted by a Staff proper flying therefrom a Banner Argent charged with a Cross Gules a Knight Templar holding in his dexter hand a Battleaxe also proper.

Motto 'IMPERIUM IN IMPERIO' - A government within another.
Granted 7th January 1938.

wetherby rdc arms

The wavy blue bars represent the River Wharfe. The wether refers to the place-name, and together with the ears of wheat, to the agricultural character of the district.
The castle represents the old stronghold whose ruins stood near the Council's offices. It was built by the Knights Templar in the reign of Henry III.
Wetherby had the distinction of being the first Rural District Council to receive a grant of arms.


back to contents page
back to front page
back to index page