YORKSHIRE AND HUMBER
yorkshire and the humber map (current)
The Yorkshire and Humber Area is coterminious with the Yorkshire and the Humber Government Office Region. All the councils, except the districts of North Yorkshire, are now unitary authorities.
It includes the historic counties of East Riding of Yorkshire, North Riding of Yorshire, West Riding of Yorkshire and part of Lincolnshire.
In terms of former administrative counties it includes Humberside, North Yorkshire (still existing), South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire.
In terms of ceremonial counties is includes East Riding of Yorkshire, part of Lincolnshire, North Yorkshire, South Yorkshire and West Yorkshire.

  1. Richmondshire N Yorks
  2. Hambleton N Yorks
  3. Ryedale N Yorks
  4. Scarborough N Yorks
  5. Cravan N Yorks
  6. Harrogate N Yorks
  7. Selby N Yorks
  8. York UA N Yorks
  9. Bradford UA W Yorks
  10. Leeds UA W Yorks
  11. Calderdale UA W Yorks
  12. Kirklees UA W Yorks
  13. Wakefield UA W Yorks (still to be added)
  14. Barnsley UA S Yorks
  15. Sheffield UA S Yorks
  16. Rotherham UA S Yorks
  17. Doncaster UA S Yorks
  18. East Riding of Yorkshire UA E Yorks
  19. Kingston upon Hull UA E Yorks
  20. North Lincolnshire UA Lincs (still to be added)
  21. North East Lincolnshire UA Lincs (no arms)

NORTH YORKSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Argent a Bendlet wavy Azure and a Bendlet sinister wavy Vert over all on a Cross Gules five Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On Wreath Argent and Azure upon a Mural Crown Gules a Lion passant guardant Or supporting with the dexter forepaw a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper en soleil.
SUPPORTERS: Upon a Compartment of a Heather Moor proper on the dexter a Lion Or holding in the sinister forepaw a Sword Argent hilt pomel and quillons Gules and resting the sinister hindpaw on a Fountain on the sinister a Lion Or holding in the dexter forepaw two Keys in saltire Argent and resting the dexter hindpaw on a Serpent coiled proper.
BADGE: A rose Argent barbed and seeded proper en soleil Or ensigned by a Mural Crown Azure thereon a Lion passant guardant Or.

Motto 'UNITATE FORTIOR' - Stronger by union.
Granted 29th April 1980.

north yorks cc arms
north yorkshire badge
Badge

The red cross of St George, like that in the arms of the former North Riding CC and is also in the arms of the City of York, has been charged with five white Yorkshire roses. The blue and green wavy bendlets represent the streams and the hills of the Dales and the Wolds.
The red mural crown alludes to the gold one which ensigned the arms of the former West Riding CC, with a lion passant guardant, as in the York City arms, and a rose en soleil, which appeared in the former West Riding CC arms.
The two lions are distinguished from other such supporters by the two crossed keys representing the ecclesiastical associations of the County, being the main charge in the arms of the Archbishopric, and the Whitby coiled serpent. The heraldic fountain alludes to the County's seaboard and again to the Dales. The Compartment consists of a heather moor.


BARNSLEY METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (S YORKS)

*ARMS: Argent on a Chevron Gules between two Shuttles fessewise in chief and in base as many Pickaxes in saltire proper a Falcon wings elevated and holding in the dexter claw a Padlock Or between two Boar's Heads couped of the last each holding in the mouth a Cross patee fitchee in pale of the first a Chief Sable thereon a Cross patee between two Covered Cups all within a Bordure embattled Or.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Gryphon Argent wings elevated Sable resting the dexter claw on an Escarpuncle of fourteen points Gules.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Glass-Blower supporting in his exterior hand a Blow-Pipe issuant therefrom in base a Glass Bottle and on the sinister side a Miner his.Pit Lamp suspended from his neck supporting in his exterior hand a Pick-Axe proper all upon a Compartment composed of a Grassy Mount to the dexter and a Pile of Coal to the sinister all proper.

Motto 'SPECTEMUR AGENDO' - Judge us by our actions.
Granted ?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Barnsley was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Barnsley, the Cudworth Urban District, the Darfield Urban District, the Darton Urban District, the Dearne Urban District, the Dodworth Urban District, the Hoyland Nether Urban District, the Penistone Urban District, the Royston Urban District, the Wombwell Urban District, the Worsbrough Urban District, part of the Hemsworth Rural District, the Penistone Rural District and part of the Wortley Rural District.

barnsley mbc arms

The arms are based upon those of the former County Borough of Barnsley, with the addition of an embattled gold border to suggested the surrounding areas now included in the Metropolitan Borough. The two shuttles represent the linen trade, one of Barnsley's main industries in the 19th century and the crossed pick axes represent the mining industry. The falcon and padlock are taken from the arms of Joseph Locke, the eminent civil engineer who was responsible for the construction of many railways in Britain and abroad and whose widow gave the beautiful Locke Park to the town in his memory. The two boars' heads are taken from the arms of the Beckett family, bankers and merchants who had various interests in Barnsley and the surrounding areas. The cross between two covered cups represents Monk Bretton Priory, which was dissolved by Henry VIII.
The gryphon, like that in the County Borough crest, is derived from the crest of the Wentworth family of Wentworth Woodhouse. The escarpuncle of fourteen points recalls the fourteen former local authority areas, which were brought together to form the Metropolitan Borough in 1974.
The supporters are the same as those of the County Borough, only transposed for difference. They represent the two former major industries of coal mining and glass manufacturing. While the miner stands upon a heap of coal, the glassblower stands upon a grassy mound which represents the rural areas of the borough.


BRADFORD CITY COUNCIL (UA) (W YORKS)

*ARMS: Per pale Gules and Azure on a Chevron engrailed between in chief two Buglehorns stringed and in base a Fleece Or a Fountain the whole within a Bordure gobony of the first and Argent charged on the Gules with eleven Roses of the last barbed and seeded proper.
*CREST: Upon a Mural Crown per pale Gules and Azure a Boar's Head sans Tongue erased Or; Mantled Azure and Gules doubled Or.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Stag Or gorged with a Collar Azure thereon three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper and on the sinister side an Angora Goat Argent horned Or gorged with a Collar Gules charged with three like Roses.
*BADGE: Upon a Mural Crown per pale Gules and Azure charged with a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper a Boar's Head sans Tongue erased Or.

Motto 'PROGRESS INDUSTRY HUMANITY'.
Granted ?.

The City of Bradford was formed by the amalgamation of the former City and County Borough of Bradford, the Borough of Keighley, the Baildon Urban District, the Bingley Urban District, the Denholme Urban District, the Ilkley Urban District, part of the Queensbury and Shelf Urban District, the Shipley Urban District, the Silsden Urban District and part of the Skipton Rural District.

Picture, blazon and description courtesy of Laurence Jones.

bradford city arms
bradford badge
Badge

The shield is based on that of the former Bradford City Council with additions to indicate the merger of eleven Yorkshire councils. The original Bradford shield featured a red and blue per pale field bearing an engrailed gold chevron between three hunting horns. In the new arms the third horn has been replaced by a fleece, representing the woollen industry, as can be seen in the arms of the Baildon UDC, the Bingley UDC and the Silsden UDC, as well as the device of Queensbury and Shelf UDC. The chevron is charged with an heraldic fountain, which replaces the well of the former arms, and is like those in the arms of the Borough of Keighley and the Ilkley UDC. The red and white bordure charged with eleven white roses, being a familiar emblem of Yorkshire, represents the union of the eleven former Yorkshire councils.
The boar's head, as in the former City's crest, refers to the legend of the boar of Cliffe Wood. This was a ferocious boar that lived in the wood on the outskirts of Bradford, and frequently drank from a well in the wood. The boar terrorized the populace and caused much damage to land and property; so much so that the Lord of the Manor offered a reward for anyone brave enough to slay the boar and bring its head to the Manor House. A hunter took up the Lord's offer, and lay in wait near the well, ready to catch his quarry and thereby claim his reward. The boar duly arrived, and was shot by the hunter, who cut out the boar's tongue as proof of his victory and set off for the Manor House. A little time later, another hunter who had heard of the Lord's offer, was passing through the woods and saw the slain boar lying near the well. Thinking of the reward he would receive, he cut off the boar's head and he too set off for the Manor House. Arriving there before the true victor, he claimed his reward for having disposed of the ferocious creature, but was unable to account for the boar's absent tongue. The first hunter then arrived, explained the true circumstances of the defeat showing the boar's tongue as evidence of his veracity and received his rightful reward. In allusion to this legend the boar is shown without a tongue. The mural crown is a frequent symbol of local government, but here also suggests a well head.
The stag is derived from the device of the Denholme UDC and the arms of the Borough of Keighley, but represents the District as a whole. The white angora goat is reatained from the former arms, recalling that the wool of this animal was used in the local industries. The roses on the collars again refer to Yorkshire roses and the compartment resembles the area's hills and dales.


CALDERDALE METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (W YORKS)

ARMS: Vert a Paschal Lamb proper supporting over tne shoulder a Cross Staff Or flying therefrom a forked Pennon of St. George between in chief a Bar wavy Argent charged with a Barruret wavy Azure and in base a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Vert out of a Mural Crown a Rose Tree of nine branches proper each terminating in a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Or gorged with a collar wavy Azure and holding aloft in the interior forepaw a Crescent Sable.
BADGE: A Rose of nine petals Argent barbed proper and charged with a Roundel Vert thereon a Bar wavy Argent charged with a barrulet wavy Azure.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA ARTE PRUDENTIA'-By industry skill and foresight.
Granted ?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Halifax, the Borough of Brighouse, the Borough of Todmorden, the Elland Urban District, the Hebden Royd Urban District, the Ripponden Urban District, the Sowerby Bridge Urban District and part of the Queensbury and Shelf Urban District.

calderdale mbc arms
calderdale badge
Badge

The green shield with its blue wave represents the River Calder and its valley. The Paschal Lamb, derived from the crest of the County Borough of Halifax, is the emblem of St. John the Baptist and of the wool industry. The white rose represents Yorkshire.
The mural crown is a familiar emblem for a civic authority, made of the characteristic local stone, from which rise nine white roses joined on a single stem, representrng the union of the nine former Yorkshire areas in one authority.
The gold lions were the supporters of Halifax, and one was the main charge in the arms of the Borough of Brighouse, from which are also taken the black crescents held in the lion's paws. Each lion is collared with a wave of blue like that in the arms of the Borough of Todmorden shield, where it alluded to the Calder.
The motto refers to the special aptitudes of Calderdale, not only in woollen manufacture, but in all kinds of other trades and activities carried on in the area, including the pursuit of the arts.


CRAVEN DISTRICT COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Vert three Roses in fess Argent barbed and seeded proper between in chief two Fleeces Or and in base statant upon a representation of the Summit of Ingleborough issuant a Craven Heifer proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours on the Battlements of a Tower proper a Wyvern Gules gorged with a Collar compony counter compony Or and Azure and resting the dexter foot on a Cross patonce Vair.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Azure and on the sinister side a Lion Argent each gorged with a Garland of Roses Argent barbed seeded and leaved proper and holding in the interior forepaw a Cross crosslet fitchy that on the dexter bendwise and that on the sinister bendwise sinister Gules.

Motto 'NEC TEMERE NEC TIMIDE' - Neither rashly nor timidly.
Granted 16th July 1976.

The Craven District was formed by the amalgamation of the Skipton Urban District, the Settle Rural District and part of the Skipton Rural District.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

craven dc arms

The green background of the shield symbolises the Yorkshire Dales in which Craven lies. The three York roses combine the two in the Skipton UDC arms and the single one in the Settle RDC crest. The two golden fleeces, like that in the arms of Skipton, represent the two former Skipton "sheep town" authorities and the woollen industry. The Craven Heifer standing on Ingleborough summit, is from the Settle RDC crest. The seal of the Skipton RDC also had a Craven Heifer and a sheep.
The colours of the wreath and mantling are in the basic colours of the shield, green and white, the heraldic liveries of Settle and the natural colour of the Craven landscape. The battlements of a tower indicate Skipton Castle and the red wyvern is from the heraldry of the the Cliffords, both seen in Skipton's crest. To identify it as the Clifford wyvern, it has a collar of gold and blue chequers from the Clifford's shield, which runs across the top of Skipton's. The blue and white patterned cross comes from the arms of Bolton Priory, thus combining references to the two dominant historic influences in the Skipton area.
The supporters are derived from the lions in the Settle RDC arms. On the left is the blue lion of the Percys, and on the right the white lion of the Mowbrays. The two families, two of the most powerful in England in medieval times, held most of the Settle rural area. Each lion has about the neck a garland of three white roses like those in the shield, and this is suggested by the garland of roses about the necks of the supporters of the arms of the Dukes of Devonshire, Lords of the manors of Settle and Giggleswick. Three of England's principal dukedoms are thus represented by the supporters who hold, aloft, a red pointed crosslet from the arms of the Earls of Craven, descended from Sir William Craven of Appletreewick, the "Dick Whittington of Wharfedale" who became Lord Mayor of London during the reign of James I. He later made benefactions to his native area.


DONCASTER METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (S YORKS)

ARMS: Per pale Sable and Vert issuant from barry wavy of four in base Argent and Azure a Port between two Towers each with a conical cap ensigned by a ball the Portcullis raised between eight Roses three three and two Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon the Battlements of a Tower an Owl Argent gorged with a collar company Or and Azure between two Branches of Oak issuant each having four leaves and fructed of four Acorns proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion sejant Or that on the dexter gorged with a representation of the device of British Rail Gules pendent therefrom a Miner's Safety Lamp proper that on the sinister gorged with a Flash of Lightning Azure pendent therefrom by the ring an Anchor Sable.
BADGE: An Octagon gyronny of eight Sable and Vert charged with a Port between two Towers as in the Arms.

Motto 'BE STEADFAST'.
Granted 1st September 1975.

The Metropolitan Borough of Doncaster was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Doncaster, the Adwick-le-Street Urban District, the Bentley with Arksey Urban District, the Conisbrough Urban District, the Mexborough Urban District, the Tickhill Urban District, the Doncaster Rural District, part of the East Retford Rural District, the Thorne Rural District and part of the Worksop Rural District.

doncaster mbc arms
doncaster badge
Badge

The black and green green background is like that of the Doncaster RDC and with the same symbolism - coalmining predominantly to the west and agriculture to the east. The white and blue waves in the base represent the River Don and the castle is from the County Borough of Doncaster arms. Here the castle is depicted without flags, recalling the version seen in the Charter of 1467, and perpetuated in the castle in the arms of the Doncaster RDC. The eight white roses of York allude to the eight constituent Yorkshire authorities comprising the new District.
The tower battlements represent the strongholds at Conisbrough and Tickhill. The "civic crown" - a Roman crown of oak leaves and acorns, which was bestowed for civic achievement is appropriate for a civic authority. It is shown with eight leaves and eight acorns, one for each authority. This Roman civic crown is also a reference to the considerable local associations with the Roman period, including the fort at Doncaster, the great Roman Ermine Street running through Doncaster, Bentley-with-Arksey and Adwick-le-Street, and the Roman Ridge in the same area. The white owl is from the crest of the Savile Earls of Mexborough, used as part of the Mexborough UDC device. Here it is differenced with a gold and blue collar derived from the chequers of the Earls Warenne, Norman lords of Conisbrough.
The supporters are the distinctive seated lions of the County Borough of Doncaster, without the York roses held in the mouth, and differenced with emblems suggesting other important local industries. The British Rail device and the miner's safety lamp for the railways and coalmining and the blue lightning flash and anchor for the electrical and shipbuilding industries situated in the Thorne Rural District. The anchor is also a reminder of the importance of the Don as a navigable river.


EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Barry Vert and Or on a Chevron engrailed plain cotised Gules three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Issuing from a Mural Crown Argent an Eagle displayed Gules armed and langued Azure supporting with the dexter talons a Sword hilt upwards and with the sinister talons a Crozier in saltire Or; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Lion Azure guardant armed and langued Gules gorged with a Wreath of Barley supporting between the forelegs a Trident Or on the sinister a demi-Horse Argent langued Gules maned Or the feet webbed Vert conjoined to the lower half of a Hippocampus Vert supporting between the forelegs set upon a Staff a Cross fleury Gules.

Motto 'TRADITION AND PROGRESS'.
Granted 1996.

The East Riding of Yorkshire District was formed on 1st April 1996 by the amalgamation of the northern part of the Boothferry District, the Borough of Beverley, the Borough of East Yorkshire and the Borough of Holderness.

east riding of yorkshire arms

The green and gold stripes represent the wealth generated by the land of the East Riding. The three white roses refer to Yorkshire and the "engrailed" edge and "cotises" of the red chevron were added to ensure that these simple arms are unique.
The red and white colours of the mantling are those of St. George. The eagle appeared in the arms of the former East Riding County Council, Humberside County Council and East Yorkshire Borough Council, previously blue and now coloured red. The history and industry of the area are represented by a crozier and a sword, found in the arms of Humberside CC, Beverley BC , East Yorkshire BC and Holderness BC .
The blue lion was also a supporter of the arms of Beverley and featured in the device of Boothferry DC, the wreath of barley suggests the ear of barley in the East Yorkshire crest. The seahorse and trident, suggested by the supporters of Holderness, refer to the maritime interests of the area.


HAMBLETON DISTRICT COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per fess wavy Azure and Or two Barrulets wavy Argent and Vert between in chief three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper and in base an Estoile Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours three Hills thereon between two Oak Trees fructed a Boar passant proper resting its dexter foreleg on a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Cleveland Bay Horse and on the sinister a Ram both proper upon a Compartment comprising per pale Grass and Corn also proper.
BADGE Within a Garland of Roses Argent barbed and seeded and Oak Leaves proper a Roundel per pale Azure and Or charged with the Head of a Cleveland Bay Horse couped proper.

Motto 'TO BE OF SERVICE'.
Granted ?

The Hambleton District was formed by the amalgamation of the Northallerton Urban District, the Bedale Rural District, part of the Croft Rural District, Easingwold Rural District, Northallerton Rural District, part of the Stokesley Rural District and part of the Thirsk Rural District.

hambleton dc arms

The main colours of blue and gold are taken from the arms of the Northallerton UDC and small white and green wavy bars represent the rivers and hills in the district. The three white roses show that this is a Yorkshire authority and the black estoile, which takes the same form as the polar stars in the arms of Captain Cook, refers to his well known connection with the Stokesley district.
The three hills represent the Hambleton Hills from which the district takes its name and the wild boar has been previously used as a motif in the area. The oak trees refer to the Forest of Galtres and the boar rests its foot on another Yorkshire rose.
The ram may be taken as an allusion to the agricultural interests of the district and the horse, similarly both to the racing activities of the district and to the White Horse carved into the hillside at Kilburn.


HARROGATE BOROUGH COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Quarterly Azure and Gules on a Fess wavy Or between in chief to the dexter the Ripon Horn straps and chains Or and to the sinister a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper and in base to the dexter a Roundel barry wavy Argent and Azure and to the sinister a double towered Castle Or a Lion passant guardant Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Apple Tree fructed proper between two Stalks of Wheat all Or.

Motto 'TO BE OF SERVICE'.
Granted 30th August 1974.

The Borough of Harrogate was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Harrogate, the City of Ripon, the Knaresborough Urban District, the Masham Rural District, the Nidderdale Rural District, the Ripon and Pately Bridge Rural District, part of the Thirsk Rural District, the Wath Rural District, part of the Wetherby Rural District and part of the Wharfdale Rural District.

harrogate bc arms

The division of the shield into quarters is like that of the former Borough of Harrogate and the wavy gold fess refers to the borough's rivers. In the first quarter is the Ripon Wakeman's Horn, used from time immemorial as the unofficial arms of of Ripon. The custom of blowing the horn every night at the four corners of the obelisk in the Market Square in front of the Wakeman's (Mayor's) house at nine o'clock, maintained to this day, is said to have originated about AD 700. It was probably at first a means of calling the people together in case of a sudden invasion, but was afterwards a signal for setting the watch. The white rose shows that the borough lies in Yorkshire and the heraldic fountain is for Harrogate, a famed spa resort. The castle was used as an emblem by the Knaresborough UDC and the royal lion upon the fess represents the Royal Forest of Knaresborough.
The Ribston Pippin Apple tree, suggested by the apple in the arms of the Nidderdale RDC, and the ears of wheat, like those in the arms of the Wetherby RDC


KINGSTON UPON HULL CITY COUNCIL (UA) (E YORKS)

ARMS: Azure three Ducal Coronets in pale Or.

Recorded without tinctures at the Visitations of 1612 and 1665/66. Tinctures certified in 1879.

kingston upon hull city arms

The arms have been in use on seals of the City since the fifteenth century. There is a tradition that these arms originated in the device of a local company of 'Merchant Adventurers', who likened themselves to the three Kings of the East who followed the star to Bethlehem, and is a motif used by many towns across Europe, representing trade with far off nations.
Mr Fox-Davies states "A more likely origin, may be found in the arms of the City of Cologne, and the habit of those who imported fine linen from that City to set up the arms thereof as indicative of the wares they dealt in."
Still more likely is it that the crowns were adopted in token of Edward I, who, seeing its value as a port, took over the town of Wykeham-upon-Hull from the Monks of Meaux and gave it a charter, so that thereafter it was called the 'King's Town'. This simple explanation of the arms, which seems to have been obscured owing to the fact that nowadays the town is commonly called Hull, is supported by the thirteenth century seal which bears the figure of a king flanked by two lions and with a third at his feet.


KIRKLEES METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (W YORKS)

ARMS: Vert on a Bend Argent a Bendlet wavy Azure on a Chief Or a Pale between two Cog-Wheels Azure on the Pale a Pascal Lamb supporting a Staff Or flying therefrom a forked Pennon Argent charged with a Cross Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Ram's Head affronty couped Argent armed Or gorged with a Mural Crown Sable masoned Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion rampant guardant Purpure resting the inner hind leg on a Cross Crosslet Or embellished in each of the four angles with a Fleur de Lis Azure.
BADGE: A Roundal Purpure charged with a Lacy Knot Or all within a Circle of eleven Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'TOGETHER WE SERVE'.
Granted 24th June 1974.

The Metropolitan Borough of Kirklees was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Dewsbury, the County Borough of Huddersfield, the Borough of Batley, the Borough of Spenborough, the Colne Valley Urban District, the Denby Dale Urban District, the Heckmondwike Urban District, the Holmfirth Urban District, the Kirkburton Urban District, the Meltham Urban District and the Mirfield Urban District.

kirklees mbc arms

The green shield alludes to the fields and woods of Kirklees. The silver band refers to the motorway that passes through the area and the smaller blue wave to water used for power, drinking and washing wool. The cog wheels represent industry and the Pascal Lamb, as seen the shield of the Borough of Spenborough, to John the Baptist, patron of wool workers.
The ram's head, like the crest of the County Borough of Huddersfield and the shield of the Mirfield UDC, again refers to the woollen industry. Its horns are gold, for the wealth that flowed from textiles and the mural crown refers to Borough status.
The purple lions are from the arms of the de Lacy family mediaeval Lords of Huddersfield. The cross crosslets and fleur de lys refer to Our Lord and Our Lady repectively, to whom the Nunnery of Kirklees was dedicated.
The purple roundel of the badge combines the de Lacy purple and the and the Lacy family badge of a Lacy Knot together with eleven white roses for the eleven former Yorkshire authorities now incorporated into Kirkless.


LEEDS CITY COUNCIL (UA) (W YORKS)

ARMS: Azure a Fleece Or on a Chief Sable three Mullets Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an Owl proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side an Owl proper ducally crowned Or.

Motto 'PRO REGE ET LEGE' - For king and law.
Recorded at the Visitaion of 1666. Crest and supporters granted 7th November 1921.

The City of Leeds was formed by the amalgamation of the former City and County Borough of Leeds, the Borough of Morley, the Borough of Pudsey, the Aireborough Urban District, the Garforth Urban District, the Horsforth Urban District, the Otley Urban District, the Rothwell Urban District, part of the Tadcaster Rural District and part of the Wetherby Rural District.

leeds city arms

The golden fleece is appropriate to this city, much of the prosperity of which is derived from textile industry, particularly in relation to wool. The Borough Seal of 1626 shows a, shield, with a fleece only, and two crowned owl supporters, a compliment to the first Alderman, Sir John Savile (whose Arms featured three owls). In 1662, after the granting of the second Charter a new Corporate Seal was struck and in honour of the first Mayor, Thomas Danby, three mullets (part of the Danby Arms) were incorporated. Following the Municipal Corporations Act of 1835 the full insignia of shield, crest, supporters and motto came into regular use and was confirmed and assigned by the College of Arms in 1921. The only change required by the College was that the owls be changed from 'Argent' to 'Proper'.


RICHMONDSHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per pale Azure and Gules a Bend Erminois in sinister chief a Fleece Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure within an Astral Crown Or a Mount of Ling proper thereon in front of two Swords in saltire points uppermost proper pomels and hilts Or a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper; Mantled parted Gules and Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Horse Sable gorged with Mural Crown and crowned with a representation of a Royal Crown of King Henry VII Or resting the interior hind leg on a Tower Argent and standing on a Compartment consisting of a Grassy Mount Or charged with three Barrulets wavy Azure.
BADGE: A Castle Ermine within an Annulet Flory Or.

Granted 20th December 1983.

The Richmondshire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Richmond, the Aysgarth Rural District, part of the Croft Rural District, the Leyburn Rural District, the Reeth Rural District and the Richmond Rural District.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

richmondshire dc arms
richmondshire badge
Badge

The blue half of the shield and gold band are from the arms of the Scropes, the most important family historically in the district, and the red half is from the arms of the Borough of Richmond. Blue and red were also the basic colours of the arms of the Plantagenet Earls and Dukes of Richmond. The ermine spots, like those of Richmond, are taken from the arms of the Duke of Brittany, early holders of the Honour of Richmond. The fleece depicts a Swaledale Ram, a breed common to Richmond and its surrounding Dale and one of the main forms of agriculture in the district.
The white rose refers to Yorkshire and the crossed swords, like those in the arms of the Richmond RDC, commemorate the very close association between the military at Catterick Garrison and the Council. The astral crown likewise reflects the link between the Royal Air Force and the Council and the mound of ling, refers to Dales National Park, a substantial part of which lies within the District.
The two black horses representing racing and mural crowns symbolise local government. The other crowns are a representation of the Royal Crown of King Henry VII, last Tudor Earl of Richmond. The use of this crown is a signal honour and was granted by HM Queen Elizabeth II. Richmondshire has had along history of association with Royalty, and Gilling West one of the Parishes to the north of Richmond was one of the seats of Saxon kings. Richmond itself was founded by William the Conqueror as one of his bastions and fortresses for the surveillance and domination of the north. In Charles II's Charter for the continuance of Richmond Borough a special provision was made for the appointment of Town Clerk to be approved by the Crown, and this practice continued until the reorganisation of Local Government in 1972. The silver towers represent the several castles of Richmondshire including Richmond, Ravensworth, Gilling West and Bolton, but more importantly, also represent the great Honour of Richmond which was founded by William the Conqueror. An Honour is a group of manors held under one Lord and Richmondshire is a splendid example of a really powerful Medieval Honour. The supporters stand on a gold mount (a rich mound) through which run three blue wavy horizontal lines which represent the Rivers of Richmondshire namely the Swale, Ure and Bain.
The tower in the badge represents the principal castle in the district, Richmond, fortified against all comers. The spattered ermine spots commemorate the fact that it was a Royal Honour. The gold ring represents unity and the six fleur-de-lys, signify not only growth, but are also another Royal symbol, representing the six authorities now joined in Richmondshire and united and flourising.


ROTHERHAM METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (S YORKS)

ARMS: Vert on a Fess wavy between in chief a Mitre between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper and in base a Cogwheel Argent a Bar wavy Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi-Horse Sable resting its dexter hoof upon a Cogwheel proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Buck and on the sinister a Griffin Or each charged upon the neck with a Bar wavy Sable.

Motto 'BY INDUSTRY AND HONOUR'.
Granted February 7th 1983?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Rotherham, the Maltby Urban District, the Rawmarsh Urban District, the Swinton Urban District, the Wath upon Dearne Urban District, the Kiverton Park Rural District and the Rotherham Rural District.

rotherham mbc arms

The two white roses and the archiepiscopal mitre, as in the arms of the County Borough of Rotherham, symbolise Yorkshire and Thomas Rotherham, Archbishop of York 1480-1500. He was a native of Rotherham, founder of our lost College of Jesus of Rotherham and benefactor to the church. The silver wavy bar alludes to the River Rother, and upon it is charged a wavy bar to refer to coal. The cogwheel is a general allusion to industry.
The crest is a demi Shire Horse supporting a cogwheel.
The supporters comprise a golden stag, derived from the arms of Archbishop Rotherham and used by the former County Borough. The golden griffin derived from the arms of the Marquesses and Earls of Rockingham, the Wentworths, and the seen in the crest of the former Rotherham RDC. The Wavy black bar on the neck of each supporter alludes to coal, as does that in the arms.


RYEDALE DISTRICT COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Gules a Catherine Wheel of nine spokes Argent in chief a Garb Or between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Upon the Marions of a Mural Crown Argent masoned Sable in front of a Palmer's Staff Or and a Crozier Argent in Saltire an Eagle displayed Or holding in the beak a Twist of Flax proper; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the Dexter a Monk of the Cistercian Order habited proper holding in the exterior hand a Hoe Or and on the Sinister a Clerk in Holy Orders and a Religious in Liturgical Vestments proper holding in the exterior hand a Book Gules garnished Or.
BADGE: Nine ears of Rye proper enfiled by a Mural Crown Gules .

Motto 'PROFICIT HOMO TERRA MANET' - A man passes on to better things whilst earth remains inviolate.
Granted 4th April 1977.

The Ryedale District was formed by the amalgamation of the Malton Urban District, the Norton Urban District, the Pickering Urban District, the Flaxton Rural District, the Helmsley Rural District, the Kirkbymoorside Rural District, the Malton Rural District, the Norton Rural District and the Pickering Rural District.

ryedale dc arms
ryedale badge
Badge

The Catherine wheel is from the arms of Walter Espec principal land owner of the district in the early Middle Ages. Espec was the founder of the Abbey of Rievaulx and of the Priory of Kirkham. The Catherine wheel usually has eight spokes but, here there are nine spokes to signify the nine councils enjoined in the new district. The two white Roses of York and are from the arms of the old East Riding CC and North Riding CC, as the district extends into these former County Council areas. The sheaf of rye alludes to the district name and is also the agricultural importance of the area. The main colours of red and silver are the principal colours in the arms of the former Malton UDC, Pickering UDC, the North Riding CC, Rievaulx Abbey, Kirkham and Malton Priories and in the arms of more than twelve of the important families of the Ryedale district.
The mural crown, with its white masonry, represents the castles of Helmsley, Pickering, Sheriff Button, Malton, Kirkbymoorside and Slingsby and is also very appropriate for use in civic heraldry. The golden Roman Eagle indicates the strong Roman influence in Ryedale. The Eagle has in its beak a twist of flax, which is from the arms of Flaxton RDC. The golden palmer's staff is from the arms of Malton Priory and was a staff carried by pilgrims. Next to the staff is a silver crozier the staff of a bishop and in this case it is for St Chad and his brother St Cedd - founders of the Abbey of Lastingham in the 7th Century.
The supporter on the left is a Monk of the Cistercian Order in the white habit of the Order and holding a hoe. On the right is a Clerk in Holy Orders in Liturgical Vestments of red and gold and holding a red coloured hook with gold clasps. They refer to the great religious houses of the Middle Ages and their patrons - particularly that of Rievaulx. The whole character of Ryedale with its good agricultural background and mainly pastoral life can be traced back to the influence and education of the monks. At the dissolution of the Monastries in 1536 the Abbey of Rievaulx alone owned twenty parishes and seventeen other places in the Ryedale District.
The badge signifies the grouping of the nine former authorities into a civic whole and is also canting or allusive heraldry on the name of Ryedale.


SCARBROUGH BOROUGH COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per fess wavy Gules and Argent in chief an Estoile of seven points between issuant from the dexter a Lymphad and from the sinister a square Tower all Argent in base three Barrulets wavy Azure all within a Bordure Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Lymphad Sable the sail per pale Gules and Argent charged with an Estoile of seven points counter-charged three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag reguardant Gules that to the dexter gorged with a Chain pendant therefrom a Bugle Horn Or that to the sinister gorged with a like Chain pendant therefrom a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'PER PERICULA AD DECUS IRE JUVAT' - Let it rejoice thee to set dangers at nought in the quest of honour.
Granted 8th May 1975.

The Borough of Scarborough was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Scarborough, the Filey Urban District, the Scalby Urban District, the Whitby Urban District, part of the Bridlington Rural District, the Scarborough Rural District and the Whitby Rural District.

scarborough bc arms

The design follows very closely that of the former Borough of Scarborough, whose arms were based on the town's seal dating from the thirteenth century, and illustrate the town's historic and enduring features - its harbour and castle. The addition of a gold border represents the wider area of the new Borough.
The lymphad and star, also from the ancient seal, are repeated in the crest and signify the strong seafaring tradition of the area, the sail being charged with an estoile of seven points to represent the seven former local authorities which were united to form the new borough.
The stags represent the forests of Pickering, Galtres, and Knaresborough, the horn on one commemorating a Royal Hunt. The presence of the Yorkshire rose requires no explanation.


SELBY DISTRICT COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Argent a Cross Gules between four Roundels that in the first quarter Vert charged with an Eagle displayed Or that in the second Sable charged with a Swan proper that in the third Vert charged with a Garb Or and that in the fourth also Vert charged with a Cross Moline also Or on a Chief paly Sable and Gules an ancient Crown Or between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Mural Crown Gules two Lions combatant Or supporting a Short Sword proper; Mantled Gules lined Argent.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Monk of the Order of St. Benedict in habit and cowl proper holding in his exterior hand a Hoe Or sinister in front of a Blacksmith habited holding in the exterior a Hammer an Anvil all proper on a Compartment of a Grassy Mount a River in chevron reversed wavy with water barry wavy Azure and Argent.
BADGE: A Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper charged with a Lozenge Sable dimidiating a Garb Gules.

Motto 'TO ACT FOR OTHERS'.
Granted 8th March 1978.

The Selby District was formed by the amalgamation of the Selby Urban District, the Derwent Rural District, part of the Hemsworth Rural District, part of the Osgoldcross Rural District and part of the Tadcaster Rural District.

selby dc arms
selby badge
Badge

The red cross on white is that of of St. George. The gold eagle on the first roundel, like that on the head of the Roman Centurion's Standard in the arms of the Tadcaster RDC, represents the area's Roman associations, especially in the Tadcaster area. The swan on the second roundel is from the arms of Selby Abbey and the device of the Selby UDC. The golden wheatsheaf on the green third roundel refers to the agriculture of the district. The last roundel is also green and bears a cross moline, like the arms of the Osgoldcross RDC, for the other religious establishments of the area. The alternate black and red chief with white roses combines the chiefs of the arms of the former West Riding and East Riding County Councils, as the area incorporates parts of both. The roses also featured in the arms of the Hemsworth RDC and the ancient crown records that Henry I was born at Selby Abbey.
The mural crown represents local government, on which stand two English lions supporting a short sword.
The Benedectine monk is another reference to Selby Abbey and the hoe he holds is for agriculture. The blacksmith, with a hammer and anvil is for industry. The compartment, divided by a wavy chevron, represents the three rivers of the district.


SHEFFIELD CITY COUNCIL (UA) (S YORKS)

ARMS: Per fesse Azure and Vert in chief eight Arrows interlaced saltirewise banded Argent and in base three Garbs fessewise Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Lion rampant Argent gorged with a Collar and holding between the paws an Antique Shield Azure charged with eight Arrows as in the Arms.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a figure habited as Thor resting his exterior hand on a Hammer all proper and on the sinister side a figure habited as Vulcan standing in front of an Anvil and in the dexter hand a pair of Pincers all also proper.

Motto 'DEO ADJUVANTE LABOR PROFICIT' - With God's help our labour is successful.
Arms and crest granted 26th July 1875. Supporters granted 31st August 1893. Transferred 1st September 1977.

The City of Sheffield was formed by the amalgamation of the former City and County Borough of Sheffield, the Stocksbridge Urban District and part of the Wortley Rural District.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

sheffield city arms

The sheaf of arrows was the main motif in the seals of the Burgery of Sheffield and the Twelve Capital Burgesses, the two bodies which were responsible for most of the local government of Sheffield before the creation of the Borough. The three wheatsheaves on a green field doubtless refer to the name of the City and the River Sheaf.
The white lion is taken from the arms of the Dukes of Norfolk, lords of the manor of Sheffield. It also appeared also in the arms of the Talbots, Earls of Shrewsbury, their predecessors in the lordship. One of the Talbots founded the Shrewsbury Chapel in the parish church of St. Peter.
The two supporters, Vulcan and Thor, are appropriate for a place whose prosperity is almost entirely founded on the working of metal. Thor, the smith of the Scandinavian gods rests his hand on a hammer, and Vulcan, the smith of the Greek and Roman gods, stands in front of an anvil and holds a pair of pincers.


YORK CITY COUNCIL (UA) (N YORKS)

ARMS: Argent on a Cross Gules five Lions passant guardant Or.

Recorded without tinctures at the Visitation of 1584.

york city arms

It is likely the arms were granted by King Edward III (1327-1377). He made York his capital when fighting the Scots. The cross of St. George, the patron saint of England, and the lions of England are appropriate to the second city of England.
The arms are often displayed with civic sword and mace crossed behind the shield, and with a chapeau above it. The right to use the sword, mace and cap by the Mayor of York was granted in 1396 by King Richard II, when York received county status. Even though the use of these attributes in combination with the arms are not formally granted, they have been depicted as such since the 18th century.


TOWN AND PARISH COUNCILS

BEVERLEY TOWN COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Argent three Bars wavy and a chief Azure thereon a Castor Beaver reguardant biting at the fur Or.

Recorded at the College of Arms.

beverley tc arms

The town arms represent the situation of Beverley near water by wavy bars and the supposed derivation of the name by a beaver. The arms and tinctures were recorded in 1584 and those were evidently the usual arms by the 18th century, when they were used on the marketcross and in the guildhall. The arms have, however, been quartered with others: Or an Eagle displayed Azure. The eagle, probably for John the Evangelist, the patron saint of the Beverley Minster, may have appeared on the 16th-century town seal and the quartered arms were seen on another seal in 1584-5; they were used later on a seal and on the waits' and mayor's chains. It was probably from the Beverley arms that the eagle was taken as a device by the former East Riding county council.


BRIDLINGTON TOWN COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Per pale Sable and Argent three Gothic Capital letters B counterchanged on a Chief embattled of the second two Barrulets wavy Azure.
CREST: Issuant from a Coronet composed of eight Roses set upon a Rim Or a Sun rising Gules.

Motto 'SIGNUM SALUTIS SEMPER' - Ever the sign of health.
Granted 26th September 1934, to the Bridlington Borough Council. Transferred 5th November 2001. Exemplified 8th January 2002.

bridlington tc arms

The B's are said to have come from the arms of Bridlington Priory. There is, however, no absolute proof that Bridlington Priory actually used this coat of arms but its use after the dissolution of the Priory in 1537 is not too long for the tradition to have endured. The arms have however been used by the charitable trust known as The Lords Feoffees and Assistants of the Manor of Bridlington. There is a theory that the three B’s are a reference to the Trinity and thereby strengthens the possibility that this coat of arms did formerly belong to the Bridlington Priory. The blue waves and rising sun refer to the town's position on the east coast, and the roses represent Yorkshire.


DRIFFIELD TOWN COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Barry of ten Argent and Azure a Pale Vert charged with a Ram's Head caboshed proper between in chief and in base an Ear of Barley leafed Or.
CREST: Issuing from a Circlet Sable charged with three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper a Hart's Head also proper charged on the neck with two Keys in saltire Or; Mantled Azure doubled Argent.

Granted 10th September 1956, to the Driffield Urban District Council.

diffield tc arms

The background of ten white and blue bars are the basis of thearms of the ancient Hotham family of Scorborough Hall, one member of which was responsible for the building of the tower of All Saints' Church, Driffield. The green pale represents the ancient North-South road running through the town and the ram's head and ears of barley indicate the town's history as a great agricultural market centre.
The white roses are from the former East Riding CC arms and the hart's head represents the old Wapentake of Harthill in which Driffield lies. The crossed keys of St. Peter refer to the Liberty of St. Peter's within the Wapentake, also to the chapelry of Little Driffield, dedicated to St. Peter.


FILEY TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per fess in chief Azure a representation of Filey Brig proper with the Sun shining thereon Or the base per pale wavy Gold and also Azure three Pallets wavy Argent on the last.
CREST: Within a Crown of Rays of Ancient Rome Or a Seagull proper rising from a Rock Vert holding in the beak a Fish also proper; Mantled Azure doubled Or.

Motto 'FILEY ET FELICITAS' - Filey and felicity.
Granted 17th July 1952, to the Filey Urban District Council.

filey tc arms

The shield suggests golden sands, the sea and sunshine.
The gull holding a fish is an emblem of the sea and fishing. The crown refers to the area's Roman connections.


HORNSEA TOWN COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Or three Bars wavy Azure issuant from the base a Sun in splendour Gules a Chief wavy Sable thereon a Fountain between two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or a Sun in splendour Gules surmounted of a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper; Mantled Gules doubled Or.

Motto 'HEALTH AND HAPPINESSS'.
Granted 24th June 1955, to the Hornsea Urban District Council.

hornsea tc arms

The blue and gold waves represent the sea and sands, the white roses are for Yorkshire. The heraldic fountain probably refers to Hornsea Mere, the largest natural lake in Yorkshire. The sun is appropriate to a resort town and is easterly position and the mural crown is a common symbol of local government.


ILKLEY PARISH COUNCIL (W YORKS)

ARMS: Gules a Stone Celtic Cross proper between two Fountains on a Chief Argent a Lion passant guardant Sable armed and langued of the first.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Mount of Rocky Moorland proper thereon issuant from a Crown Palisado Or a Bull salient Gules the horns Gold.

Motto 'PER SALUBRITATUM OPES' - Through health, wealth.
Granted 4th December 1956, to the Ilkley Urban District Council.

Ilkley Urban District was incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

ilkley pc arms

The heraldic fountains represent Ilkley township with its wells, Ben Rhydding, and the River Wharfe. The cross represents Burley and is a copy the cross erected there in memory of the Rt Hon. W.E. Forster, of Burley, MP for Bradford, who obtained the passing of the Education Act 1870, and thus secured free education for all children. Burley-in-Wharfdale Urban District was incorpoated into Ilkley in 1936 as was a greater part of the Parish of Menston. The black leopard is from the heraldry of the Fairfaxes of Denton Hall - Colonel Charles Fairfax, third son of the first Baron Fairfax of Cameron, resided at Menston Hall where it is believed Oliver Cromwell and General Sir Thomas Fairfax dined on June 30, 1644, two days before the decisive Battle of Marston Moor.
The mount in the crest stands for the local rocky moors and the old Roman fort is typified by the crown which is fashioned like a palisade. The leaping bull refers to the builder of this fort, Julius Agricola, who was known as "The Bull", which is also an indirect reference to the Cow and Calf Rocks, a well-known local feature.
The motto has reference to Ilkley as a health resort and spa.


KEIGHLEY TOWN COUNCIL (W YORKS)

ARMS: Argent on a Fess Sable between three Stags' Heads caboshed a Fountain proper all within a Bordure embattled Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Dragon's Head erased Gules entwined by a Serpent Or a Fountain proper.

Motto 'BY WORTH'.
Granted 7th February 1883, to the Keighley Borough Council.

Incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

keighley bc arms

The black fess is from the heraldry of the ancient family of Keighley, Lords of the Manor. In the reign of Queen Elizabeth I the heiress of the Keighleys car­ried the estate by marriage to the family of Cavendish, represented in the arms by the stags' heads. The roundel, or heraldic fountain, refers to the situation of Keighley in a well-watered valley, the streams of which have greatly tended towards the progress of the town, being of great value for manufacturing purposes. The blue embattled border shows that the arms are those of an ancient town - Keighley having obtained its original market charter in the reign of Edward I.
The dragon's head is also from the heraldry of the Keighleys and the serpent from the Cavendishes.
The motto, refers to the name of the principal stream on the banks of which Keighley is situated.


MALTON TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Argent three Bars Gules an Eagle displayed wings inverted Or pendent from the neck by a Guige an Escutcheon also Gules charged with a Cross patonce of the field on a Chief Azure three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a demi Griffin Argent gorged with a Collar Azure thereon three Crescents Or resting the sinister claw on the battlements of the crown and the dexter on an Escutcheon lozengy also Argent and Gules.

Motto 'VETERA NOVAQUE TUERI' - To safeguard the old and the new.
Granted 30th October 1957, to the Malton Urban District Council. Transferred 26th July 1977.

malton tc arms
de vesci arms
Arms of de Vesci

The three red bars on the white field are from the arms of Malton Priory, founded in 1150 by Eustace Fitz John. The Golden Eagle of Rome indicates the legionary fort of Derventio, which was established in AD70, on the present site of Malton. From its neck hangs the shield of William de Vesci, Lord of Malton, whose descendants continued in the Lordship for many generations. The blue chief with three Roses of York is taken from the North Riding CC arms, and refers especially here to the three parishes of SS Michael and Leonard (New Malton) and St. Mary (Old Malton).
The red and white of the wreath and mantling are the colours of Malton Priory, the North Riding, de Vesci and Fitzwilliam. The mural crown represents Malton Castle and the white Griffin, with its collar of gold crescents on blue from the arms of the Wentworths and holding the Fitzwilliam shield denotes the later history of the Manors Old and New Malton.
The motto suggests the Council's care of Old and New Malton and its concern with the town's ancient history and modern development.


NORTHALLERTON TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per pale Or and Azure a Standard of three points mounted on a Car the pole ensigned with a Cross Formy all between two Lions rampant anciently crowned the dexter Lion contournée the whole counterchanged.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Cushion Gules tassled Or charged with three Roses Argent thereon a Durham Mitre proper.

Motto 'FOR GOD AND CROWN'.
Granted 30th July 1957, to the Northallerton Urban District Council.

northallerton tc arms

The main charges on the shield refer to the Battle of the Standard, also called the Battle of Northallerton. This took place in 1138, when English forces repelled a Scottish army on Cowton Moor near the town. The Scottish forces were led by King David I and the English were commanded by William of Aumale. The centre of the English position was marked by a mast mounted upon a car or cart bearing a pyx carrying the consecrated host and from which were flown the consecrated banners of the minsters of York, Beverley and Ripon: hence the name of the battle and the three points of the standard in the arms.
The Durham mitre and cushion refers to the fact that in the 11th century King William II gifted land here to the Bishop of Durham. Under the Bishop's authority Northallerton became an important centre for religious affairs. The roses refer to Yorkshire, Northallerton being the county town of North Yorksire.


NORTON-ON-DERWENT TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Vert an Eagle displayed Or beaked and membered Gules between in chief two Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper and in base a Bezant on a Chief Gold a Ram's Head caboshed between two Boars' Heads couped all Sable armed Or langued Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert a Horse courant Sable mounted thereon a Jockey habited proper the shirt Green the sash belt and cap Ochre; Mantled Vert doubled Or.

Motto 'PROVIDENTIA PROFICIEMUS' - By foresight we progress.
Granted 20th September 1958, to the Norton Urban District Council. Transferred by Order made 25th July 1978.

norton tc arms

The eagle represents the Roman occupation of the town and the white roses are for Yorkshire. The bezant or gold roundel is one of the three of St. Nicholas, to whom the first church in Norton was dedicated. The ram's head and boars' heads refer to the town's main industries - bacon factories and a wool grading plant.
The gold and green of the wreath allude to agriculture. The horse refers to Norton's fame as a centre for training racehorses and earned the title "Newmarket of the North". The jockey wears the colours of the late Mr William l'Anson, an owner of racehorses and Blink Bonny training establishment at Norton.


OTLEY TOWN COUNCIL (W YORKS)

ARMS: Argent on a Pile Azure three Towers two and one of the first in the middle chief point two Keys in saltire wards upwards and inwards Or.

Granted 14th December 1951, to the Otley Urban District Council.

Otley Urban District was incorporated into the City of Leeds in 1974.

otley udc arms

The arms are based on those granted to the Otley Association in 1798. The three towers perhaps refer to the three manors of Otley, Cawood and Wistow, which were elevated into a "Liberty" by King Athelstan in the year 937.


PICKERING TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Per fess wavy Argent and barry wavy Azure and Argent above a Castle an Ancient Crown Gules on a chief of the last three Roses Argent barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Pike fessewise Argent in the mouth an Annulet Or.

Motto 'EVER LOYAL'.
Granted 15th September 1961, to the Pickering Urban District Council. Transferred by Order in Council 11th April 2001.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

pickering tc arms

The blue and white waves refer to Pickering Beck and the red castle, to that constructed in the 11th century on the order of William the Conqueror, and later replaced by the present stone structure and a royal hunting lodge. The red crown alludes to the Duchy of Lancaster, which was granted the Castle and Manor of Pickering in 1267. The three white roses are those of Yorkshire.
The pike and ring refer to the legends surrounding the founding of the town around 270 BC by a King Peredurus of the Gavrantuici tribe, where he was later buried. There are several versions of the tale, one says he lost his ring while fishing in a nearby river, some years later he caught a pike in the same river, took it home for the table and when it was cut open after being cooked, the ring was found. Another says he lost the ring in the River Costa and wrongly accused a kitched maid of stealing it. When the palace cook found the ring in a pike, the King suffering remorse, sought out the kitchen maid and was so smitten by her beauty that he made her his Queen and named the town "Pike-ring".


POCKLINGTON TOWN COUNCIL (E YORKS)

ARMS: Azure a Fess dancetty of three points Or between in chief a Crimson Water-Lily Flower leaved proper between two Garbs and issuant in base a Long Cross enfiling a Celestial Crown Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure within a Mural Crown Or masoned Sable environed of a Garland of Roses Argent barbed seeded and leaved proper three being manifest a demi Eagle displayed Sable holding in the beak Gules a Length of Chain in the form of a Letter W the terminal links fracted Sable.
BADGE: Within a continuous Rose Stem orlewise leaved proper set with three Roses two in chief and one in base Argent barbed and seeded proper a Celestial Crown enfiled by a Garb throughout Or.

Motto 'SERVICE WITH FREEDOM'.
Granted 27th June 1980.

pocklington tc arms
pocklington badge
Badge

The black background, fess dancetty and the two wheatsheaves are derived from the arms of the Dolman family, founders of Pocklington School, which displays their arms in full. The fess is also a feature of, in fact the only bearing in, the shield of the Vavasour family. The wheatsheaves and a water-lily recall the famous lily-ponds at Burnby Hall, and indicate Pocklington as an important agricultural and horticultural centre, and highlight the activities of the floral and agricultural societies in Pocklington. The gold celestial crown and plain cross represent the ecclesiastical role Pocklington has played in the life of the district, its Church, dedicated to All Saints, being known as 'The Cathedral of the Wolds', and has notable historic connexions with Paulinus and the Archbishopric of York. The cross also refers to the cruciform shape of the Church, and to the early advent of Christianity in Pocklington attested by the cross at the west end of the Church commemorating the preaching of Paulinus on this site in the seventh century.
The blue and gold of the crest-wreath and mantling are the livery colours of the Dolmans, the Percys, former Lords of the Manor, and the former East Riding CC. The garland showing three white roses of York, encircling a mural crown, a familiar emblem in local government, represents 'a town in Yorkshire'. The black eagle is that of William Wilberforce, one of Pocklington's most famous scholars, holding in his red beak a length of broken black chain symbolizing his role in the emancipation of the slaves. The eagle is also a reference to the former East Riding and to the former war-time airfield. The chain is disposed in the form of a letter W for Wilberforce.
The heraldic badge combines the historically important wheat-sheaf and crown from the shield within the garland of three white roses of York from the Crest, arranged in shield form.
The motto not only reminds us of Wilberforce's efforts to enable slaves to be freed so as to be able to work for their living in the community, but also of the Council's service to the community achieved through democratic government.


RICHMOND TOWN COUNCIL (N YORKS)

ARMS: Gules an Orle Argent over all a Bend Ermine.
CREST: Out of an Ancient Crown Or a Rose Argent barbed and seeded proper.

Arms recorded without tinctures 21st August 1665. Confirmed with tinctures and crest granted 4th August 1959, to the Borough of Richmond. Transferred by Order made 16th April 1975.

richmond tc arms

The orle is possibly derived from the arms of Baliol of Barnard Castle. The ermine is from the arms of the Counts and Dukes of Brittany, who in the twelfth century held the Honour of Richmond.
The crest is derived from that previously used unofficially of a crowned red rose, this seems to have been derived from an embellishment on the seal on which the above arms were placed. The rose is now white for Yorkshire.


SILSDEN TOWN COUNCIL (W YORKS)

ARMS: Or on a Chevron Sable between in chief a patriarchal Cross Vert on either side thereof three Sparrow-Bills two in saltire and one in pale points downwards of the second and in base a Ram's Head caboshed proper a Rose Argent barbed and seeded also proper between two demi Suns Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Wyvern Gules grasping in the dexter claw a Sprig of Flax slipped leaved and flowered proper.

Motto 'UNITY AND SERVICE'.
Granted 6th October 1954, to the Silsden Urban District Council.

Silsden Urban District was incorporated into the City of Bradford in 1974.

silsden tc arms

The chevron is taken from the arms of the Jennings family, who held the Manor of Silsden as early as 1487, and the double cross denotes the town's connections with the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem who held lands at Silsden previously in the possession of the Knights Templar. It is coloured green to represent land. The three shoe-nails or "sparrow-bills" on each side of the cross, recall the old nail-making industry of Silsden from 1744 until recently. The ram's head typifies both the woollen industry, which played such a large part in the history of Silsden, and the farming industry of the outlying districts. The white rose refers to Yorkshire and the sun's rays were adopted to represent the rayon industry, now the principal industry of the town.
The red wyvern is adapted from the arms of the Clifford family of Skipton Castle, Earls of Cumberland and ancient lords of the Honor of Skipton in which Silsden was an important manor. The flax flower denotes the ancient flax-growing industry of Silsden Moor in the 18th century to meet the demand for cordage and sail for the rapidly expanding Royal Navy.


TODMORDEN TOWN COUNCIL (W YORKS)

ARMS: Or on a Fesse wavy Azure between a Rose Gules in chief and a Rose Argent in base both barbed and seeded slipped and leaved proper a Shuttle in bend sinister and a Spindle in bend of the fourth.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Mount Vert an Obelisk proper.

Motto 'WE PROSPER BY INDUSTRY'.
Granted 31st December 1896, to the Todmorden Borough Council.

Incorporated into the Metropolitan Borough of Calderdale in 1974.

todmorden bc arms

The wavy fess represents the River Calder which, at the time the arms were granted, was the boundary between Yorkshire and Lancashire. The boundaries were later altered, and the area of the borough lies wholly in Yorkshire, but the red and white roses commemorate its former division between the two counties. The emblems on the fess stand for the textile industry.
The obelisk forming the crest represents Stoodley Pike, erected to mark the Peace of Amiens.


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