ALNWICK DISTRICT COUNCIL

ARMS: Paly of four Or and Gules issuant from barry wavy of four in base Argent and Azure a Mount thereon a Port between two Towers proper statant thereon a Lion tail extended Azure armed and langued Argent.
CREST: On a wreath of the Colours a Lymphad sail furled Sable flying flags and pennon of St. George the hull charged in the centre with a Cogwheel and the mast and rigging enfiling a Coronet Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag proper gorged with a Collar Argent fretty Gules pendent therefrom by a riband Or a Hammer head upward proper.
BADGE: On a Roundel paly of four Or and Gules fimbriated Argent a Mount in base thereon a Port between two Towers proper.

Motto 'SERVICE WITH JUSTICE'.
Granted 2nd February 1976.

The Alnwick District was formed by the amalgamation of the Alnwick Urban District, the Amble Urban District, the Alnwick Rural District and the Rothbury Rural District. The area was abolished on 31st March 2009, and became part of the Northumberland County Unitary Authority.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

alnwick dc arms
alnwick badge
Badge

The four gold and red stripes are derived from the arms of the Northumberland CC as is appropriate to the area embracing the ancient County capital. The County arms have eight gold and red stripes - here the shield is divided into four stripes only, in the same colours, for the four areas comprising the new District. The stylized waves of white and blue, at the base of the shield, refer to the sea and the rivers, especially the Coquet and the Aln. On the mound stands a two-towered grey-stone castle upon which is the Percy crest, the blue lion with extended tail, as seen on the Lion Bridge and the Tenantry Column in Alnwick. These recall the castle and lion in the Northumberland crest, and refer to the castles of the area, at Alnwick and Warkworth (both Percy castles) and Dunstanburgh. The castle is also the ancient badge of the County Sheriffs , and is a reminder that in Alnwick the County Courts were held and the High Sheriff read royal proclamations at the Market Cross.
The lymphad symbolises the the port at Amble, it is black for the former coal-carrying trade, and is charged on the hull with a cogwheel for the local industries, especially marine engineering. The ship flies English flags of St. George and Amble's history is remembered by one of the gold crowns from the arms of Tynemouth Priory encircling the mast.
The stags represent Rothbury by reference to the Forest and the prominent families of Ravensworth and Armstrong. The Forest and its wild life are typified by the deer. The collars bearing fretted or interlaced strips of red on white are derived from the pattern on the shield of the Ravensworths. Attached to the collar by a gold ribbon is the hammer from the arms of the Armstrongs.


BERWICK-UPON-TWEED BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Quarterly Azure and Gules in front of a Wych-Elm Tree growing from a Grassy Mount in base proper a Bear statant also proper muzzled and chained to the base of the tree with a Chain Or.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Or a Salmon leaping proper; Mantled Gules doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Stag guardant supporting an enlongated Torch enflamed proper resting the interior hoof on a Garb fessewlse Or sinister a Horse guardant supporting a Hoe all proper resting the inner hoof on an Annulet the outer edge embattled Or.
BADGE: On a Mount in front of Wych-Elm Tree proper ensigned by a Mural Crown Or a Bear statant also proper muzzled and chained to the base of the tree with a Chain Or.

Motto 'FLOREAT BERWICUM SUPER TWEDAM' - May Berwick-upon-Tweed flourish.
Granted 5th October 1977.

The Borough of Berwick-upon-Tweed was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Berwick-upon-Tweed, the Belford Rural District, the Glendale Rural District and the Norham and Islandshires Rural District. The area was abolished on 31st March 2009, and became part of the Northumberland County Unitary Authority.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

berwick-upon-tweed bc arms

The division of the background into four divisions symbolises the four former authorities out of which the current Borough was formed. Similarly, because of the special position of the Town of Berwick-upon-Tweed as the administrative centre the Bear and Tree device of the former Borough has been retained, perpetuating the heraldic pun on the name Berwick.
The mural crown is symbolic of municipal government out of which emerges a salmon in allusion to the fishing industry of the area.
The stag supporting the torch, is a symbol of St. Aidan who founded the Monastery at Lindisfarne. The stag rests a hoof upon a gold garb in allusion to the important agricultural activities of the area. The horse supporting a hoe also as an allusion to the agriculture of the area. The cog wheel is in reference to the light industries of the area.


BLYTH VALLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Per fess Gules and Azure on a Fess Argent between in chief Ancient Crowns fessewise Or and in base three Lymphads two and one proper flags flying to the dexter Gules three Ermine Spots Sable.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Sable charged with three Miners' Picks shafts upward Or a demi Lion guardant barry of three thoughout Or and Sable holding in the dexter paw a Miner's Lamp proper; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.

Motto 'WE GROW BY INDUSTRY'.
Granted 28th November1975.

The Borough of Blyth Valley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Blyth, part of the Borough of Whitley Bay and part of the Seaton Valley Urban District. The area was abolished on 31st March 2009, and became part of the Northumberland County Unitary Authority.

Picture courtesy of Laurence Jones.

blyth valley bc arms

The arms are based on those of the former Borough of Blyth. The three crowns taken from the arms of Tynemouth Priory and are incorporated owing to the great importance of the Delaval family, who formerly owned the Priory, in the area. Similarly the three spots of ermine are taken directly from the Delaval arms. It is interesting to note that the Delavals were largely responsible for the development of coal-mining in the area which ultimately developed the port and led to increased prosperity. The three ships represent the importance of the Port of Blyth, they like each emblem on the shield is displayed in triplicate to commemorate the three former authorities which merged into Blyth Valley - the Borough of Blyth, the Seaton Valley UDC and part of Whitley Bay Borough Council.
The lion, as well as being a national emblem, symbolises strength and the lamp together with the black seam running through the lion symbolises the coal-mining industry which at one time was thriving in the area.
The motto is taken from that of the original Borough of Blyth.


CASTLE MORPETH BOROUGH COUNCIL

ARMS: Barry of ten Argent and Gules a Tower triple-turreted Or a Bordure Azure charged with eight Martlets Gold.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Lion passant guardant Or charged on the shoulder with three Estoiles fessewise the dexter forepaw gautletted Gules and grasping a Sword in bend sinister Argent hilt and pommel Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Stag guardant proper attired and unguled supporting a Branch of Oak proper fructed Or a Compartment comprising a Grassy Mount proper rising from Water Barry wavy Argent and Azure therein three Trout in fess naint proper.

Motto 'INTER SYLVAS ET FLUMINA HABITANS' - Living among woods and streams.
Granted ?

The Borough of Castle Morpeth was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Morpeth, part of the Castle Ward Rural District and the Morpeth Rural District. The area was abolished on 31st March 2009, and became part of the Northumberland County Unitary Authority.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

castle morpeth bc arms

The arms are those of the former Borough of Morpeth, granted in 1552, the second earliest grant of arms accorded to a Civic Borough in England. The seal of Roger de Merlay I in 1166 bore a device of a floriated design upon the branches of which sat four merles - or blackbirds, probably a pun on the name of de Merlay. His son's seal was similar to that of his father. About 1255, however, Roger de Merlay III - the first of the family whose arms assumed a heraldic form - discarded this and adopted a seal depicting three gold merles flying up a blue shield. Ten years later he had the middle part of his shield painted in stripes of silver and red within a blue border upon which were eight golden merles. He thus combined upon the coat of arms the birds of his own family with the bars of the Stuttevilles, from whose family his grandmother was descended. When the arms were granted to Morpeth, he retained 'a parcel' of the arms of the 'Noble and Valiant Knight, Sir Roger de Merlay, for a perpetual memory of his goodwill towards the town' but introduced the castle turret.
The crest is that of the Castle Ward RDC, altered to include three estoiles, for the three former authorities merged into the new Borough.
The two deer supporting sprigs of oak and standing on a grassy mound over three fish swimming in a stream give emphasis to the town's motto.


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