CUMBRIA AND PALATINE COUNTIES AREA
cumbria and palatine counties map (current)
The Cumbria and Palatine Counties Area is coterminious with the North East Government Office Region. I have named it after Cumbria and the Palatine Counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.
It includes the historic counties of Cumberland, Westmorland, Lancashire, Cheshire and parts of the west Riding of Yorkshire.
In terms of former administrative counties it includes Cumbria (still existing), Lancashire (still existing), Greater Manchester, Merseyside and Cheshire.
In terms of ceremonial counties is includes Cumbria, Lancashire, Greater Manchester, Merseyside and Cheshire.

  1. Carlisle Cumbria
  2. Allerdale Cumbria (still to be added)
  3. Eden Cumbria (no arms)
  4. Copeland Cumbria
  5. South Lakeland Cumbria (no arms)
  6. Barrow-in-Furness Cumbria
  7. Lancaster Lancs
  8. Wyre Lancs
  9. Ribble Valley Lancs
  10. Blackpool UA Lancs
  11. Fylde Lancs
  12. Preston Lancs
  13. Pendle Lancs
  14. Burnley Lancs
  15. Hyndburn Lancs
  16. South Ribble Lancs
  17. Chorley Lancs
  18. West Lancashire Lancs
  19. Blackburn with Darwen UA Lancs
  20. Rossendale Lancs
  21. Sefton UA Merseyside (no arms)
  22. Wirral UA Merseyside
  23. Liverpool UA Merseyside
  24. Knowsley UA Merseyside
  25. St Helens UA Merseyside
  26. Wigan UA Greater Manchester
  27. Bolton UA Greater Manchester
  28. Bury UA Greater Manchester
  29. Rochdale UA Greater Manchester
  30. Oldham UA Greater Manchester
  31. Salford UA Greater Manchester
  32. Trafford UA Greater Manchester
  33. Manchester UA Greater Manchester (still to be added)
  34. Tameside UA Greater Manchester
  35. Stockport UA Greater Manchester
  36. Warrington UA Cheshire
  37. Halton UA Cheshire
  38. Cheshire West and Chester UA Cheshire (no arms)
  39. Cheshire East UA Cheshire (no arms)

CUMBRIA COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Per pale Azure and Or a Pale wavy per pale of the last and Vert over all two Bars dancetty of three points upwards countertinctured Argent Azure Argent and Vert all within a Bordure of the last charged alternately with three Roses Argent on each another Gules both barbed and seeded proper and as many Parnassus flowers Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent Azure and Vert issuant out of a Mural Crown Argent masoned Gules a Ram's Head proper armed Or between two Parnassus Flowers slipped also proper; Mantled Vert doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a representation of the Dacre Bull at Naworth Gules armed unguled and collared with a Chain flexed over the back Or and on the sinister side a Dragon also Gules the whole upon a Compartment composed of a section of the Roman Wall charged with two Bars Gules.
BADGE: A Roundel per pale Azure and Or a Pale Wavy per pale Or and Vert over all two Bars dancetty of three points upwards countertinctured Argent Azure Argent and Vert enclosed by an Annulet of Stonework proper masoned Sable.

Motto 'AD MONTES OCULOS LEVAVI' - I shall lift up mine eyes unto the hills.
Granted 10th October 1974.

The County of Cumbria was formed by the amalgamation of the former Counties of Cumberland and Westmorland, the County Boroughs of Barrow and Carlisle and parts of Lancashire and Yorkshire (West Riding).

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

cumbria cc arms
cumbria badge
Badge

The wavy vertical lines, zig-zag horizontal lines and combination of colours is an ingenious formal diagrammatic picture of the new County as a whole. Blue and white - for the sea, blue and gold - for the lakes and agriculture, green and white - for mountains and lakes and green and gold - for mountains and agriculture. On the green border are parnassus flowers from the arms of the Cumberland CC interspersed with white roses for Yorkshire, superimposed with red roses for Lancashire.
The ram's head is taken from the arms of the Barrow CBC and also of the Westmorland CC and is distinguished from them by parnassus flowers, taken from the Cumberland arms. The mural crown is a common civic emblem.
The Dacre Bull at Naworth, a legendary beast was one of the supporters of the Cumberland Arms. The red dragon refers to those that support the device of Appleby - the ancient county town of Westmorland; also it is heraldically related to the red wyverns of Carlisle and symbolises the connection, going back to Celtic times, between Cumbria and Cambria (Wales). The compartment represents Hadrian's Wall, across which are two red bars taken from the Westmorland arms, which in turn derived them from the arms of the de Lancaster Barons of Kendal. The Barony of Kendal was in the South of Westmorland.
The motto is taken from the latin version of Psalm 121, which was thought apt, as the Lake District Fells can be seen from all parts of the new County.


LANCASHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL

ARMS: Gules three Piles two issuant from the chief and one in base Or each charged with a Rose of the field barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Lion passant guardant proper charged on the body with a Mascle Gules and resting the dexter forepaw on an Escocheon of the above said Arms.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion proper gorged with a Collar Vair pendent therefrom an Escocheon of the following Arms viz. Gules three Piles two issuant from the chief and one in base Or each charged with a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'IN CONCILIO CONSILIUM' - In council is wisdom.
Arms and crest granted 31st Agust 1903, Supporters granted 26th October 1903.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

lancashire cc arms

The red rose, originally a badge of the Earls and Dukes of Lancaster, and the device of the Lancastrian faction in the Wars of the Roses, has become the County emblem and is the principal feature of the arms.
The lions are derived from the heraldry of the Ferrers, Earls of Derby, who held the land between the rivers Ribble and Mersey in the thirteenth century before the Earldom (later Duchy) of Lancaster was created.


BARROW BOROUGH COUNCIL (CUMBRIA)

ARMS: Gules on a Bend between a Serpent nowed in chief and a Stag trippant in base Or an Arrow pointing upwards to a Bee volant proper upon a Chief Argent on Waves of the Sea a Paddle-Wheel Steamship under steam and canvas also proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of the Battlements of a Tower a Ram's Head proper armed and collared Or.

Motto 'SEMPER SERSUM' - Ever onward.
Granted 13th December 1867. Transferred by Order in Council bearing date the 16th April 1975.

The Borough of Barrow was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Barrow-in-Furness and the Dalton-in-Furness Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

barrow bc arms

The bee is an emblem of industry, and with the arrow, forms a rebus on the name of the town - though if the original meaning of Barray (Barrow) was Barley Isle. The knotted serpent and the stag trippant in are derived from the crests respectively of the Duke of Devonshire and the Duke of Buccleuch, who are the principal landowners - the latter also being Lord of the Manor of Plain Furness. The paddle-wheel steamship upon on the waves of the sea, under steam and canvas, is allusive of Barrow as a shipping port.
The ram's head with horns and collar of gold, is allusive of the name of the late Sir James Ramsden of Abbot's Wood, Furness Abbey, who was first Mayor of Barrow. By its conspicuous position, it emphasises the prominent part taken by him in the development of the resources of the Borough, and thus in an heraldic manner permanently identifies his name with the town of Barrow.


BLACKBURN WITH DARWEN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (LANCS)

ARMS: Argent a Fesse wavy Sable between three Bees volant proper on a Chief Vert a Bugle stringed Argent between two Fusils Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Shuttle Or thereon a Dove wings elevated Argent and holding in the beak the Thread of the Shuttle reflexed over the back and an Olive Branch proper.

Motto 'ARTE ET LABORE' - By skill and labour.
Granted 14th February 1852, to the former Borough of Blackburn.

The Borough of Blackburn was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Blackburn, the Borough of Darwen, part of the Turton Urban District and the parishes of Yate and Pickup Bank, Eccleshill, Livesey, Pleasington and Tockholes from the Blackburn Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

blackburn bc arms

The bee is an emblem of skill, perseverance and industry. "B" also stands for Blackburn, and further, as the Peel family sprang from this neighbourhood and bears a bee in flight on its shield, the idea naturally suggests itself that Sir Robert Peel had adopted the Blackburn bee. The white background is emblematical of calico, a product of Blackburn, and the black wavy line represents the Black Brook (Blakewater) on the banks of which the town is built. The green background of the chief is a reminder of the time when Blackburn was one of the Royal Forests in the time of Edward the Confessor. The silver bugle horn was the crest of the first Mayor of Blackburn, William Henry Hornby. It is also the emblem of strength. The gold lozenges, or fusils, are the heraldic emblems of spinning, derived from the Latin fusus or fusilium meaning a spindle, and they refer to the invention of the "Spinning Jenny" in 1864 by James Hargreaves, a native of the district. They also denote the connection of Joseph Feilden, with Blackburn, as Lord of the Manor, as he bore lozenges on his shield.
The shuttle is the emblem of weaving, the trade which has contributed more than any other to the prosperity of the town. The dove taking wing with an olive branch in her beak (the em blem of peace) attached to the thread of the shuttle, represents the beneficial results emanating from the art of weaving.
This motto is very appropriate because Blackburn, once a small town, has risen to importance through the energy and enterprise of her spinners and manufacturers, combined with the skill and labour of her operatives.


BLACKPOOL BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (LANCS)

ARMS: Barry wavy of eight Sable and Or a Seagull volant proper on a Chief Argent a Thunder-Bolt also proper between a Fleur-de-Lis and a Lion rampant both Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours on the Battlements of a Tower Or the Sails of a Windmill saltirewise proper surmounted in the centre by a Rose Gules barbed and seeded also proper.

Motto 'PROGRESS'
Granted 10th June 1899, to the Blackpool County Borough Council.

blackpool bc arms

The black wavy bars represent the waves of the sea at Blackpool and the golden bars the bright shining sands of the shore for which the town is noted. The seagull is an emblem suitable for a seaside resort. The thunder-bolt is intended to allude to the enterprise of Blackpool as a pioneer in the adoption of electricity for lighting and traction purposes. The fleur-de-lis and the lion were distinguishing features in the arms of the Banks and Cocker families respectively and their inclusion in the arms of the Borough is meant to perpetuate the close association of those families with the early history of the town.
The battlements of a tower represent the idea of "corporateness", and is also the emblem of grandeur and solidity. The sails of a windmill refer to "the Fylde" a district in which Blackpool occupies a very important and prominent position. The Fylde formerly contained many and does still retain a few windmills, picturesque old landmarks which have for many years formed a distinguishing feature of the surrounding countryside. It may also be said that the windmill sails allude to the health-givng breezes for which Blackpool is so well known. The red rose refers to the County.


BOLTON METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Gules an Arrow point upwards enfiled by a Crown palisado Or all within a Bordure Or charged with eight Roses of the first barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of a Crown palisado Or a Rocky Moor thereon an Elephant statant proper on its back a Port between two Towers the trappings Or and charged with a Rose as in the Arms.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion that on the dexter Sable gorged with a Wreath Or and Gules that on the sinister Gules gorged with a Wreath Or and Azure each supporting a Staff Or flying therefrom a forked Pennon Vert that on the dexter charged with a Shuttle in bend surmounted of a Spindle in bend sinister that on the sinister with a Hornet volant all Or.
BADGE: Upon an Oval Gules environed of a Torse Or and Gules an Arrow point upwards enfiled by a Crown palisado Or.

Motto 'SUPERA MORAS' - Overcome delays.

The Metropolitan Borough of Bolton was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Bolton, the Borough of Farnworth, the Blackrod Urban District, the Horwich Urban District, the Kearsley Urban District, the Little Lever Urban District, the Turton Urban District (part) and the Westhoughton Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

bolton mbc arms
bolton mb badge
Badge

The gold arrow and crown palisade, form a rebus or visual pun with the arrow or "bolt" and the crown representing a "tun" (a settlement within a stockade which is the meaning of the second syllable of the name), thus Bolton. The border of eight red roses on gold to represents eight Lancashire local authorities. The shield shows, therefore, eight Lancashire local authorities joining to form Bolton.
The elephant and castle are based on the former crest of the County Borough of Bolton with a red rose on gold trappings for Lancashire. The crown palisade as in the shield has eight points (three are hidden) to represent the eight constituent areas.
The black lion from the former Bolton arms symbolises the Flemish weavers who settled in the area in the 14th century and established the textile industry here. Differenced by having round its neck a wreath of gold and red, the colours of the former Bolton arms. The red lion, derived from that of the Borough of Farnworth, represents the Hulton family of Farnworth but was changed to blue to match the rest of Farnworth's arms and is here returned to its true colour. About its neck is a wreath of gold and blue, the colours of Farnworth's arms. The pennon bearing the spindle and shuttle represents the textile industry and the other bears a hornet for the paper industry.
The motto is also a pun on the early name of Bolton, Bolton-super-moras i.e. Bolton on the moors, and is particularly apt now that further moors are included in the local authority area.


BURNLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Or a Chevron engrailed between three Roses Gules barbed seeded slipped and leaved proper on a Chief wavy Sable two ears of Wheat in saltire slipped and leaved between two Bees volant Or.
CREST On a Wreath of the Colours on a Mount Vert environed of a Wreath of the Cotton Plant flowered proper a Stork Argent beaked and membered Gules resting the dexter claw on a Lacy Knot Purpure.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Purpure armed and langued Vert gorged with a Collar Argent charged with three Mullets Sable and resting the interior hind paw on a Shuttle fesswise Sable the thread inward to the shield Or.
BADGE: A Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper charged with a Bee volant Or.

Motto 'HOLD TO THE TRUTH'
Granted 17th December 1975.

The Borough of Burnley was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Burnley, the Padham Urban District and part of the Burnley Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

burnley bc arms
burnley badge
Badge

The shield retains the pattern of the Burnley CBC arms of an engrailed red chevron on gold and a black wavy chief, for the River Brun. The three red roses, stalked and leaved as in the device of the Padiham UDC, indicate the three Lancashire authorities comprising the new Borough. The ears of wheat, from the arms of the Burnley RDC, and the two bees, for Burnley and industry, suggest the area of Burnley Rural District and the industrial areas of Burnley and Padiham.
The main feature of the crest, as in that of the Burnley CBC, is the punning stork of the Starkies, prominent in Padiham and the Burnley rural area. It rests a claw on a Lacy knot, the badge of the de Lacys, who held Burnley and Blackburnshire in mediaeval times coloured purple like their lion. The hill on which it stands, is surrounded by the cotton plant, for the cotton spinning industry.
The purple lion, mentioned above, is from the de Lacy arms. It was seen in the County Borough arms and the Rural District crest, as in the crest of the lattter he is differenced with a collar showing black stars on white from the arms of the Towneley family, long associated with the Burnley area. The black shuttles from the arms of the Shuttleworths, were seen in the Padiham device and the Rural District Council crest.
The motto is a translation of the Towneley's motto "Tenez le vraye".


BURY METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

*ARMS: Per saltire Argent and Azure a Saltire party and fretty counter-changed between in chief a Bee volant in base three Culms of the Papyrus Plant issuant from a Mount proper and in the flanks a Ram's Head to the dexter and a Bull's Head to the sinister both of the First.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Mural Crown Gules thereon a Wyvern reguardant wings expanded Argent and charged on the shoulder with a Cog-Wheel Azure.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Bull reguardant Argent gorged with a Mural Crown Azure and charged on the shoulder with a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper and on the dexter a Wyvern reguardant wings elevated also Argent gorged with a Mural Crown Gules and charged on the shoulder by a Cog-Wheel Azure.

Motto 'FORWARD IN UNITY'.
Granted ?

The Metropolitan Borough of Bury was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Bury, the Borough of Prestwich, the Borough of Radcliffe, the Urban District of Tottington, part of the Urban District of Ramsbottom and the Urban District of Whitefield.

bury mbc arms

Use has been made of the basic design and colours of the former County Borough of Bury arms. The concept of dividing the shield (the interweaving providing a clear allusion to the textile industry) has been retained, though as a saltire rather than a cross. From Bury's crest comes the bee to represent industry and from its arms the culms of a papyrus plant to represent papermaking. The ram's head and bullock's head come from the devices of the Ramsbottom UDC and the Tottington UDC respectively. The fact that the principal colour of the field is silver should be taken as an allusion to Whitefield UDC.
The wyvern, derived from one of the supporters of the Borough of Prestwich, sits on a mural crown with six castellations representing the six constituent authorities.
The Supporters are drawn from the supporters of the Borough of Radcliffe and the Borough of Prestwich, they represent two old established families, the Radcliffes and the Egertons. They wear mural crowns, for civic government, and a red rose for Lancashire and a cogwheel for engineering.


CARLISLE CITY COUNCIL (CUMBRIA)

ARMS: Or on a Cross patée between for Roses Gules a Rose of the field barbed and seeded proper; The Shiels ensigned by a Mural Crown having three Towers Or and lined Gules the centre Tower pierced by a Gateway Gules.
SUPPORTERS: Upon a Mount Vert on either side a Wyvern Gules armed and langued Azure the wings semée of Roses Or barbed Vert.

Motto 'BE JUST AND FEAR NOT'.
Granted 7th July 1924.

The City of Carlisle was formed by the amalgamation of the former County Borough of Carlisle and the Border Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

carlisle city arms

Over the centuries Carlisle has had four different arms, all used officially. The earliest was the red cross between four red roses on a golden field with a fifth rose on the centre of the cross. The red cross on the golden field probably originated from the arms of Sir William de Carlyell, of Cumberland, in the reign of Edward II. The red roses are almost certainly in honour of the Virgin Mary whose emblem is the red rose and to whom Carlisle Cathedral was formerly dedicated. These arms were used continuously until the setting up of the reformed corporation in 1835. The corporation then adopted the shield which was first shown on Speed's map of Carlisle dated 1610. This was the shield bearing a castle standing on wavy lines and with a lion above it. The interpretation of that shield was simply, an English city standing on the banks of a river. From 1885 the corporation decided to utilise both the shields mentioned side by side and this was the situation until in 1923. The College of Arms informed the Town Clerk that the city had not been officially registered and the design had therefore no authority. New arms were therefore drawn up, these are the present arms which incorporate the original shield with the red cross on the golden field. The shield is surmounted by a mural crown which indicates that Carlisle was at one time a walled city, and is supported by two red wyverns their wings strewn with golden roses, the whole standing on a green mount. The wyvern is a two legged dragon with a forked tail, and its use shows the links between the Celts of Cumbria and those of Wales. The number of roses on the wyvern's wings is not specified, and official and equally correct reproductions may be seen with either four or six roses on each wing. The motto beneath the arms comes from Wolsey's speech to Cromwell in Shakespeare's Henry VIII and was adopted by the city about 1850.


CHORLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Or on a Chevron Gules three Escochoens Argent each charged with a Blue Bottle slipped and leaved proper on a Chief of the second a Crown Vallery of the first.

Motto 'BE AWARE'.
Granted 3rd July 1882, to the former Borough

The Borough of Chorley was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Chorley, the Adlington Urban District, the Withnell Urban District and the Chorley Rural District.

chorley bc arms

The arms are based on those of the Chorley family, viz Silver a Chevron Gules between three bluebottles. These were used by the Local Improvement Commissioners before the incorporation of the town. The crown vallery, is like the more usual mural crown, a civic emblem.
In 1988, the motto was changed from the original "BEWARE".


COPELAND BOROUGH COUNCIL (CUMBRIA)

ARMS: Per fesse dancetty of the points in chief Azure and Vert on a plain Base Argent two Barrulets wavy Azure on a Chief Or between two Flashes of Lightning palewise throughout also Azure an Anchor all between two Miners’ Picks heads upwards Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure out of the Battlements of a Red Sandstone Tower proper in front of two Abbatial Crosiers in saltire the heads upwards and outwards Or a representation of the ancient Cross at Gosforth issuant proper; Mantled Azure and Argent.
SUPPORTERS: Dexter a Dragon wings elevated and addorsed Argent gorged with a Wreath of Laurel proper sinister a Lion Azure winged Or gorged with a Wreath of Oak also proper the Compartment comprising of a grassy Mount growing therefrom on either side of the Shield a Parnassus Grass Flower (Parnassia Palustris) stalked and with two leaves at the base proper.

Motto 'BY FAITH AND INDUSTRY'.
Granted 1990?.

The Borough of Copeland was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Whitehaven, the Ennerdale Rural District and the Millom Rural District.

copeland bc arms

The shield symbolises the topographical and industrial character of the area. Three stylised peaks in green suggest such well-known mountains as Great Gable, Scafell and Scafell Pike are set against an azure blue sky, with at their base white and blue waves for the lakes, rivers and sea. The chief depicts the traditional industries with an anchor for the ports and picks for coal and iron mining, all black on gold, the heraldic colours of the Lowthers, who from the late 17th century were so influential in developing these activities, especially in the Whitehaven area. The two blue flashes of lightning refer to the modern electrical industry served by the Sellafield and Calder plants.
The embattled tower represents the castles and strongholds such as Muncaster, Whitehaven, Egremont, Millom, Walls’ Castle and Hard Knot Fort. The two crossed gold crosiers refer to St. Bees Priory and Calder Abbey, linked with the early monastic influence, in the government and economy of the area, and particularly the purchase of Copeland (“kaupland” = ”bought land”) from the St. Bees Estates. In front of these stands the Gosforth Cross, said to be the tallest ancient cross in the country, dating from the 7th century.
The white dragon is the crest of the Lowthers, used as such in the former device of the Borough of Whitehaven; here it stands as a supporter and round its neck is the wreath of laurel which encircles the neck of the family’s white horse supporters. The blue lion with gold wings is one of the supporters of the arms of the Wyndhams of Egremont; without its wings the lion is also that of the Percys, allied to the Lucys; the two families quartered arms were borne by their Priory of St. Bees. The lion wears round the neck the wreath of oak from the arms of the Penningtons of Muncaster. The compartment suggests the rural areas; growing from it are two parnassus flowers recalling those in the arms of the former Cumberland CC.


FYLDE BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

*ARMS: Vert a representation of a Fylde Windmill Or between two Maunches barry wavy Argent and Azure.
*CREST: On a Wreath Or and Vert in front of a dexter Arm in armour embowed proper the hand gauntled also proper and grasping three Roses Gules barbed and seeded and conjoined on one stem with three leaves proper three Mullets Gules.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Lion Argent gorged with a Wreath Argent and Azure pendent therefrom a Hexagon Azure charged with a Cross flory Argent and on the sinister a Lion Or gorged with a like Wreath Or and Azure pendent therefrom a Hexagon Azure charged with a Dove volant the dexter wing inverted holding in the beak a Branch of Olive Or.

Motto 'GAUDEAT AGER' - Let the field be joyful or Let Fylde prosper.
Granted ?.

The Borough of Fylde was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Lytham St Annes, the Kirkham Urban District and the Fylde Rural District.

fylde bc arms

The shield portrays a typical Fylde windmill in gold on a green background suggested by the gold windmill sails on green in the arms of the Fylde RDC. This suggests the rural Fylde or "field", particularly the area bounded by the rivers Wyre and Ribble, which are symbolized by the six white and blue waves on either side. These appeared in both the arms of the Fylde RDC and the Borough of Lytham St. Annes.
The crest is indicative of the union of three Lancashire areas having historial associations with the Clifton family. The arm in armour from their crest was seen in the Fylde RDC crest, and the three red stars from their shield were part of the arms of Lytham St. Annes and Kirkham UDC. The arm and stars are here combined, and the gauntleted hand grasps a sprig of three red roses on one stalk with three leaves to suggest the union of the three former Lancastrian authorities.
The supporters are taken from the arms of Lytham St. Annes and Kirkham. On the left is one of the white lions from the Lytham St. Annes shield, wearing for necessary distinction a crest-wreath of the Borough's liveries, white and blue, from which hangs an hexagonal medallion bearing the white cross on blue which accompanies the lions in the Borough arms. The lions and cross are part of the ecclesiastical heraldry of Durham, the See of which owned the 12th century Priory of Lytham. The other supporter has also an ecclesiastical origin, being the gold lion of Roger de Montgomery, Earl of Shrewsbury, borne by his Abbey at Shrewsbury, to which the lordship of St. Michael, including Kirkham, was given in the 11th century by Roger de Poictou, the lord of Amounderness. This lion also wears a wreath, of the Kirkham colours, gold and blue, from which hangs a medallion like the other, bearing the main emblem from Kirkham's arms - the dove and olive branch from the ancient Kirkham borough seal.
The motto is that of the former Fylde RDC from Psalm 96 - Let the field (Fylde) be joyful, or Let Fylde prosper.


HALTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Gules four Lozenges conjoined in pale Or between two Pallets wavy Azure fimbriated Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Gules four Roses set in square Gules barbed and seeded proper and standing within the same a Garb gold.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Male Griffin reguardant azure beaked rayed and the forelegs Or langued and clawed Gules holding fesswise in the dexter claw an Alembic Gold and on the sinister side a Lion reguardant Sable armed Gules crowned Or supporting by the sinister paw an Abbatial Crozier with Sudarium proper all upon a Compartment comprising a Segment of Steel proper.
BADGE: Two Lozenges conjoined in pale each per saltire Or and Gules between two Bees Volant gold.

Motto 'INDUSTRIA NAVEM IMPLET' - Industry fills the ships.
Granted 6th October 1983.

The Borough of Halton was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Widnes, the Runcorn Urban District, part of the Runcorn Rural District and part of the Whiston Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

halton bc arms
halton badge
Badge

The gold lozenges on red, as seen in the crest of the Runcorn UDC, are derived from the arms of William Fitznigel, one of the Norman barons of Halton. The white and blue wavy "pallets" symbolize the Borough's waterways, and also brine which is an important raw ingredient in the chemical industry.
The red roses refer to Lancashire, where Hale and Widnes were formerly situated and the golden wheatsheaf provides a link with the arms of the County of Cheshire.
The blue male griffin has connections with a local legend concerning the Bold family, which once had strong associations with Farnworth Parish Church. The golden rays emanating from the griffin's body, refer to the dynamism of the district and the continual effort to increase the industrial prosperity and well being of the Borough's citizens. The golden alembic, from the crest of the Borough of Widnes, refers to the chemical industry. The black lion, is taken from the arms of the Savage family which was once an important landowner in Weston. The lion's crown is a reminder of the local links with the monarchy through the Duchy of Lancaster and Halton Castle. The abbot's crozier recalls Norton Abbey, which played an important role in the district until the dissolution. Both supporters look backwards in a vigilant manner, this underlines the need for the Borough Council to be alert in promoting the economic and social welfare of its citizens. The whole rests upon an arch of black steel, this symbolises the Runcorn-Widnes bridge, which links the twin towns, and provides the area with its most significant landmark.


HYNDBURN BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Azure on a Bend cotised all wavy Argent a Hind courant Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours out of a Mural Crown Gules masoned Sable a demi Stag Or resting the sinister foreleg on a representation of the Wheel of James Hargreaves' 'Spinning Jenny' threaded proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Purpure armed and langued Or gorged with a Collar Argent charged with a Bar wavy Azure and on the sinister side a Lion Argent gorged with a Collar Azure charged with a Bar wavy Argent each holding aloft in the interior forepaw a Staff that on the dexter in bend that on the sinister in bend sinister proper each entwined with a Rose of seven petals Gules barbed seeded stalked and leaved proper.
BADGE A Rose of seven petals Gules barbed and seeded proper charged with a Fountain thereon a Hind's Head issuant Gules.

Motto 'BY INDUSTRY AND PRUDENCE'.
Granted 5th July 1976.

The Borough of Hyndburn was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Accrington, the Church Urban District, the Clayton-le-Moors Urban District, the Great Harwood Urban District, the Oswaldtwistle Urban District, the Rishton Urban District and the Parish of Altham from the Burnley Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

hyndburn bc arms
hyndburn badge
Badge

The waves and hind suggest the name Hyndburn, the river from which the Borough is named.
The crest represents characteristic local industries, Accrington's brick manufacture - the mural crown, calico printing - the stag from the arms of the Hargreaves family of Broad Oak and cotton - the wheel of the 'Spinning Jenny' of James Hargreaves of Oswaldtwistle.
The purple lion, seen in the arms of the Borough of Accrington, is from the arms of the de Lacy family, Lords of Blackburnshire, who were also connected with Clayton-le-Moors, Church, Great Harwood and Altham. The white lion is from the arms of the Peel family of Oswaldtwistle, and was also seen in the device of Rishton UDC for the de Rishton family. The red roses, each having seven petals, represent an authority composed of seven-parts in Lancashire.
The motto is a variation of the former Accrington motto, echoing that of the Hargreaves and Peel families.


KNOWSLEY METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (MERSEYSIDE)

ARMS: Or an Eagle neck embowed wings addorsed and inverted perched upon a Cradle therein an Infant proper swaddled Gules on a Chief dancetty of three points downward Azure a Cross moline between two Bees volant Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure perched upon two Coils of Cable lying one upon the other a Cormorant wings elevated and addorsed proper holding in the beak a Balance or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Griffin Or charged on the wing with three Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper and on the sinister side a Griffin Sable beak and forelegs Or charged on the wing with three Fleurs de Lys Or.
BADGE: Upon a Plate environed of a Torse Or and Azure an eagle neck embowed wings addorsed and inverted proper.

Granted 8th January 1976.
Motto 'BY FAITH AND INDUSTRY'.

The Metropolitan Borough of Knowsley was formed by the amalgamation of the Urban District of Huyton-with-Roby, the Uban District of Kirkby, the Urban District of Prescot, part of the Rural District of West Lancashire and part of the Rural District of Whiston.

knowsley mbc arms

The gold and blue shield is derived from the heraldry of the families of Lathom and Stanley, who were seated at Knowsley Hall and played vital roles in the history of the area. Their crest the famous Eagle and Child, is shown on the gold background of the Lathom shield and also formed the main charged in the arms of the Huyton-with-Roby UDC. The eagle also appeared in the crest of the Whiston RDC. The gold cross is the insignia of the Molyneux family of Sefton and the two bees on either side of the cross are taken from the arms of the Kirkby UDC.
The double coil of cable alludes to the distinctive industry for which Prescot is so widely known. On this stands the cormorant from the Kirkby UDC crest, holding in its beak the gold balance from the Kirkby shield. The cormorant is the well-known 'liver bird' of Liverpool, which in the Kirkby crest, indicates the important part played by Liverpool and its people in the development of modern Kirkby. The gold scales represent the industrial aspect of Kirkby.
The gold griffin is derived from the supporter of the arms of the Earls of Derby, in further reference to their seat at Knowsley and their connections with the manorial history of much of the District. It is charged with three rod roses from the arms of Huyton with Roby UDC, these also represent Lancashire County Council which played an important role in the area prior to the formation of the Metropolitan Borough. The black griffin has gold beak and legs and represents the tenure of the manor of Whiston by the Bold family. On its wing are three gold fleur-de-lys, which formed part of the royal arms of John of Gaunt, who received the Manor of Prescot in 1391. The fleur-de-lys is also a familiar emblem of St. Mary the Virgin to whom the Parsh Church of Prescot is dedicated.


LANCASTER CITY COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Per fess wavy Argent and Azure a Fess wavy between in chief a Lion passant guardant and in base a Fleur-de-Lys counterchanged.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Morecombe Bay Fishing Boat sail set proper five Roses in fess Gules barbed and seeded proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion guardant Azure that on the dexter gorged with a Collar pendent therefrom by a Ring Or a Grey Stone Castle of three Towers proper that on the sinister gorged with a like Collar pendent therefrom by a like Ring a Railway Engine Wheel proper each resting the interior hind foot on a Garb fesswise the ears inward Or.
BADGE: A Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper enclosed within five Crescents points inward conjoined Or.

Motto 'LUCK TO LOYNE'.
Granted 15th August 1975.

The City of Lancaster was formed by the amalgamation of the former Borough of Lancaster, the Borough of Morecombe and Heysham, the Carnforth Urban District, the Lancaster Rural District and the Lunesdale Rural District.

lancaster bc arms
lancaster badge
Badge

The shield is based on that of the former City of Lancaster and the Lancaster RDC, from which the authority's name is derived. The main colours of white and blue are the liveries of the Duchy of Lancaster, Her Majesty the Queen being the Duke of Lancaster. Across the middle of the shield is the wave from the former arms of the Lancaster RDC, representing the River Lune which gives its name to Lancaster and Lunesdale. In the top portion of the shield is the royal lion from the City arms in blue, as it was in the former City supporters, and in the former City and former Rural District Council crests. In the lower half of the shield is the fleur-de-lys from the former Lancaster City arms, changed also from gold to white. A white fleur-de-lys on blue is the emblem of St. Mary, and this alludes to the historic Priory and Parish Church of St. Mary at Lancaster.
The crest is the fishing boat from the arms of the former Borough of Morecambe and Heysham, in front of which are five red roses of Lancaster representing the five constituent authorities, and being a link with the roses in the arms of the former Lancaster City, Morecambe and Heysham Borough and Lancaster RDC.
The supporters are the Royal Lions, changed from gold to blue and from their gold collars hang, on the left hand lion a castle of three towers in stone, being a re­minder of the famous castle which dominates the City and also of Hornby Castle which is the emblem of the former Lunesdale RDC. From the collar of the lion on the right hangs a railway engine wheel alluding to Carn­forth, which for many years was an important railway town, and is now the site of a railway museum. Each lion rests a foot on a golden wheatsheaf like that in the former crest of the Lancaster RDC, and refer to the two rural districts of Lancaster and Lunesdale now combined in the new area.
The motto is Luck to Loyne, Loyne being an alternative form of Lune, that is the river flowing through the area, and repeats the motto of the arms of the former Lancaster City Council.
The badge features the Red Rose of Lancaster, enclosed within five gold crescents, one for each of the five merged authorities.


LIVERPOOL CITY COUNCIL (UA) (MERSEYSIDE)

ARMS: Argent a Cormorant in the beak a Branch of Seaweed called Laver all proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Cor­morant the wings elevated in the beak a Branch of Laver proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter Neptune with his Sea-Green Mantle flowing the waist wreathed with Laver on his head an Eastern Crown Gold in the right hand his Trident Sable the left supporting a Banner of the Arms of Liverpool on the sinister a Triton wreathed as the dexter and blowing his Shell the right hand supporting a Banner thereon a Ship under sail in perspective all proper the Banner Staves Or.

Motto 'DEUS NOBIS HAEC OTIA FECIT' - God hath granted us this ease.
Arms and crest granted 22nd March 1797. Supporters granted 23rd March 1797.

Picture taken from International Civic Arms.

liverpool city arms

There seems to be two strands of thought as to the origins of the City's arms. Firstly, after Liverpool was founded in 1207 by King John, the new town adopted King John's seal as its own. The seal showed the eagle of St John holding a sprig of broom in its beak. The broom, or planta genista was the symbol of the royal house of the Plantagenets. In 1644 the seal was lost and a new seal was made. For some strange reason the eagle was replaced by a cormorant, a more familiar bird in the area. It is likely that the artist mistook the eagle for a cormorant. The piece of broom was replaced by a piece of seaweed. The cormorant became later known as a mythical liver bird. Secondly, that the cormorant, or liver bird and the laver were used by Liverpool only for a desire to allude to the name. This maybe so as the cormorant is not a popular heraldic emblem, proverbially used for voracity, and used by Milton as a simile for Satan.
The maritime significance of the ship, a Triton and Neptune, the God of the sea, are obvious.
The motto is a quotation from Virgil. In the Liver­pool motto "Deus" may either refer to Neptune, signifying Liverpool's debt to the sea-god, or it may mean the Almighty.


MANCHESTER CITY COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Gules three Bendlets enhanced Or a Chief Argent thereon on Waves of the Sea a Ship under sail proper.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a Terrestrial Globe semee of Bees volant all proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Heraldic Antelope Argent attired collared and chain reflexed over the back Or and on the sinister side a Lion guardant Or murally crowned Gules each charged on the shoulder with a Rose of the last.
BADGE: An Eagle displayed wings inverted Or the tail feathers enfiled by a Mural Crown Argent the claws grasping the said Crown and charged upon the breast with a Fesse dancetty of two point Gules within an Annulet of the same.

Motto 'CONCILIO ET LABORE' - By counsel and by labour.
Arms and crest granted 1st March 1842. Supporters granted 2nd March 1842. Badge granted 20th December 1957.

The City of Manchester is coterminious with the former City and County Borough of Manchester except for the addition of the Parish of Ringway from the Bucklow Rural District.

Picture taken from International Civic Arms.

manchester city arms

The golden bendlets on red are derived from the arms of the family of Grelley, feudal lords of Manchester, who ruled the city prior to 1301. The chief shows a ship in full sail, a symbol of trade and enterprise. Mr Fox-Davies in his Book of Public Arms asked 'Was the chief a prophecy of the [Manchester] Ship Canal?' It may well have been so, for although the canal was not opened until 1894 it was projected much earlier, and designs for it were prepared in 1840, two years before these arms were granted.
The crest shows a globe covered with bees, representing the world, to all parts of which the goods of the city are exported. The bees are a symbol of activity.
The white antelope (a Beaufort emblem) and golden lion, are derived from the arms of King Henry IV, Duke of Lancaster and represents the Duchy of Lancaster, to which the roses likewise allude. The mural crown is a symbil of civic government.
The motto is derived from a phrase in Ecclesiasticus 37:16 : 'Let reason be the beginning of every work and let counsel go before every action'.


OLDHAM METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Sable a Chevron invected Or between three Owls Argent on a Chief engrailed Or as many Annulets Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours issuant from a Circlet Or charged with six Annulets Gules a Rock proper thereon an Owl Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Griffin Gules each gorged with a Collar engrailed Argent charged with six Bendlets Gules pendant therefrom a Heptagon Argent that on the dexter charged with a pierced Mullet that on the sinister with a Saddle both Sable.
BADGE: On a Heptagon Sable environed by an Annulet Gules an Owl Argent.

Motto 'SAPERE AUDE' - Dare to be wise.
Granted ?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Oldham was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Oldham, the Chadderton Urban District, the Crompton Urban District, the Failsworth Urban District, the Lees Urban District, the Royton Urban District and the Saddleworth Urban District.

Picture and information thanks to Laurence Jones.

oldham mbc arms
oldham badge
Badge

The arms are derived from those of the County Borough of Oldham, which in turn originated from the arms of the ancient Oldham family. These showed three white owls divided by a plain gold chevron and three red roses on a plain gold chief. The owls suggest that the family, like the Town, called its "Owdham" as it is pronounced locally. The decorative edges of the chevron and chief, as in the former arms, may have been suggested by that of the diagonal stripes in the arms of the Radcliffe family, who held Oldham at one period. The three roses in the old Oldham family arms are replaced by three red rings giving the initial letter O. The former County Borough arms had two rings and a rose.
The crest is again derived from the former Oldham crest. The owl is shown on its rock rising from a gold circlet charged with the three red rings from the Shield.
The two red griffins, which with their adjuncts, identify the other districts in the most conveniently recognisable way, by the heraldry of their chief manorial families. The griffin is the device of the Chadderton family connected with Chadderton, Failsworth, Crompton and Lees and seen in the arms of Chadderton UDC and Failsworth UDC. It was also used by the Chetham family connected with Crompton, both these families being branches of the de Traffords, whose red griffin is also seen at Eccles and elsewhere. As a necessary difference they wear collars with engrailed or fluted edges like those of the black in the arms of the Radcliffes. On the collars are the three red diagonal stripes on white, of the arms of the Byrons, Lords of the Manor of Droylsden. From each collar hangs a white heptagon symbolic of the united seven authorities. On the left hand one is the black mullet of the Asshetons (Oldham and Chadderton) and on the other Saddleworth is represented by a black saddle in reference to the name and its derivation "a settlement on a saddle-shaped ridge".
The former Oldham motto is retained. Like the owl it contains a play on the name, the second word "AUDE" containing the syllable "Owd" of the local pronunciation of "Owdham" or "Owldham".


PENDLE BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Gules on a Chevron Argent between in chief two Sprigs of the Cotton Tree slipped and flowered proper and in base a Fleece Or a Lozenge between two Cogwheels Sable a Chief per fess enarched Azure and Vert.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules within a Roman Corona Radiata Or two Lion's Gambs erect Purpure armed and grasping a Circlet Or enfiling a Spray of three Roses Argent between two like Sprays each of three Roses Gules all barbed and seeded and conjoined on one stem proper.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Hart Royal standing upon a Broom the head inwards upon a Compartment consisting of Moorland with outcrops of Millstone Grit all proper.
BADGE: Within an Annulet issuing therefrom nine straight Rays Or between them as many Roses the three uppermost Argent the others Gules all barbed and seeded proper a Roundel Azure thereon a representation of the Big End of Pendle Hill proper.

Motto 'IN UNITATE FLORESCEMUS' - In unity we shall flourish increasingly.
Granted 9th January 1980.

The Borough of Pendle was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Colne, the Borough of Nelson, the Barnoldswick Urban District, the Barrowford Urban District, the Brierfield Urban District, the Earby Urban District, the Trawden Urban District, part of the Burnley Rural District and part of the Skipton Rural District.

Picture thanks to Laurence Jones.

pendle bc arms
pendle badge
Badge

The basic colours are red and white, the colours of the Roses of Lancaster and York and of the arms assigned to Roger of Poictou, who held all of what is now Lancashire after the Norman Conquest. The cotton sprigs, as in the arms of the Borough of Nelson, the Burnley RDC and the devices of the Borough of Colne and the Trawden UDC, represent the textile industries around which the urban areas grew. The golden fleece, also from the arms of Nelson and the device of Colne and the ram's head device of the Trawden UDC and the sheep from the seal of the Skipton RDC, is for the wool trade. The black diamond is for the ancient and modern coal mining activities in Great and Little Marsden and Trawden Forest, where tenants were allowed to dig coal from the 14th to 16th centuries, and in Brierfield, where pits were sunk in the 19th century. The two black cogwheels are for the modern engineering industries which are now supplanting or supplementing the traditional industries in parts of the Borough. The 'chief' shows an heraldically stylized Pendle, green against a blue sky.
The gold Roman 'corona radiata', frequently seen on the heads of Emperors on Roman Coins, alludes to the Roman settlements at Colne (Colunio) and elsewhere, in and near Nelson. The two purple lion's forepaws, are derived from the purple lion of the De Lacys, seen in the arms of the Burnley RDC and the device of Colne. They were Lords of the Honour of Clitheroe and Manor of Colne, and governed practically all the present Borough area in the medieval period. The two sprays of three red roses are for the six Lancashire districts - Nelson, Colne, Brierfield, Barrowford, Trawden and Burnley RDC, and the three white roses for the three Yorkshire districts - Barnoldswick, Earby and Skipton RDC. Together they symbolize the union of the nine Lancashire and Yorkshire areas to form the new Borough of Pendle.
The stags indicate the Forests of Pendle and Trawden on the western and eastern sides of the Borough. They were established as moorland game-hunting areas in the 11th and 12th centuries when the De Lacys ruled the area. The broomsticks or besoms are for difference, are associated with the traditions and legends of the Forest, and still sold in Pendle as souvenirs. Centuries ago, the forest folk used to go round 'beating' the farm buildings with poles or besoms in an ancient fertility rite in the numerous cattle farms. This use of the broomstick accounts for its association with witchcraft, and they here symbolize the Witches of Pendle.
The badge is a rayed circlet of gold, derived from the Roman crown in the crest, and set with the three white and six red roses from the crest, the whole enclosing the 'Big End' of Pendle Hill.


PRESTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Azure a Paschal Lamb couchant Argent supporting a Cross-Staff Or flying a Pennant of the second in base the letters PP of the third

Recorded at the Visitation of 1613 as a seal device. Confirmed 6th March 1950.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

preston bc arms

The Lamb is that of St. Wilfrid who is the Patron Saint of Preston. The letters 'PP' are taken to mean 'Princeps Pacis' - Prince of Peace. Since Preston has a reputation for pride because, in the eighteenth century, it was a centre of fashionable society, some people allege that the letters are short for 'Proud Preston'. However, on earlier versions of the arms the Lamb was standing and three letters 'P' were depicted on it. The reason for the three letters was to give a general balance to the arms. The arms were in later years modernised and one of the letters 'P' was left out, again as a method of improving the general design balance.


RIBBLE VALLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Or a Lion Purpure armed and langed Vert on a Chief wavy Vert two Crosiers in saltire Or.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Vert upon a Limestone Crag in front of a representation of Clitheroe Castle proper an Eagle displayed wings inverted gorged with a Roman Corona radiata Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Hart Royal proper that on the dexter gorged with a Collar Argent charged with six pierced Mullets three being visible Sable and holding in the mouth a Rose Gules barbed seeded leaved and slipped proper that on the sinister gorged with a Collar Sable charged with six Mullets three being visible Or holding in the mouth a Rose Argent barbed seeded leaved and slipped proper all upon a Compartment of Grass with Limestone Outcrops proper divided by Water barry wavy of four Argent and Vert.
BADGE: Upon a Mount Vert issuant from a Bar wavy couped per fess wavy Argent and Vert a Lion Purpure armed and langed Or supporting a Crosier Sable.

Granted 12th May 1975.

The Borough of Ribble Valley was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Clitheroe, the Longridge Urban District, part of the Blackburn Rural District, the Bowland Rural District, part of the Burnley Rural District, the Clitheroe Rural District and part of the Preston Rural District.

Picture thanks to Laurence Jones.

ribble valley bc arms

The purple lion on gold is from the arms of the de Lacys, mediaeval Lords of Blackburnshire and the Honour of Clitheroe, whose castle at Clitheroe was the centre of local government at that time. The lion is seen in the arms of the Borough of Clitheroe, Blackburn RDC and Burnley RDC, the de Lacy colours of purple and gold in those of Clitheroe RDC and Longridge UDC. The green 'chief' with wavy edge represents the Ribble Valley and the two gold crosiers from the arms of Whalley Abbey and Sawley Abbey, indicate the important part they played in the social and economic life of the west and east of the district.
The basic colours of the wreath are those of the region green and white, typifying agriculture, limestone quarrying and cotton, the main industries. On the wreath is Clitheroe Castle upon its limestone crag, the centre of local government in the Ribble Valley today as in mediaeval times. The golden eagle is that of Rome, from the arms of the Preston RDC, it symbolises that era and the important settlement at Ribchester. For distinction from other eagle crests, this eagle's neck is encircled by a Roman 'corona radiata' a plain rim with straight rays, seldom seen in civic heratdry.
The stag on the left derives from the gold stag supporters of the Stanley, Earls of Derby, as represented in the arms of the Longridge UDC, the three pierced mullets on his collar, are from the famous arms of the Asshetons, seen in those of Clitheroe Borough and Clitheroe RDC. The red rose in his mouth is for Lancashire. The stag on the right recalls the stags in the arms of the Parkers of Browsholme and the Lister, Barons Ribblesdale, whose gold mullets on black provide the stag's collar. The white rose in his mouth is for Yorkshire, all are seen in the Bowland RDC arms. The supporters stand on a special base of grass with outcrops of limestone, divided by conventional heraldic waves, representing the Ribble Valley. This takes the place of the scroll and motto which, though usual, are not obligatory.


ROCHDALE METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

*ARMS: Vert on a Pale wavy Argent a Roach haurient proper all within a Bordure Or charged with six Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper.
*CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours between two Sprigs of the Cotton Plant a Woolpack charged with a Fleece proper banded Or above a Millrind fesswise Sable.
*SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side an eagle Or gorged with a Ribband Argent pendant therefrom by a Ring or a Ram's Head also Argent and on the sinister side a Falcon Or gorged with a like Ribband pendent therefrom by a Ring Or a pierced Mulley Sable.
BADGE: A Roundel Vert upon a Pale wavy Argent a Roach haurient proper all within a Bordure Or charged with six Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper.

Granted ?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Rochdale was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Rochdale, the Borough of Heywood, the Borough of Middleton, the Urban District of Littleborough, the Urban District of Milnrow and the Urban District of Wardle.

rochdale mbc arms
rochdale badge
Badge

The green shield with a white wave running down the middle on which is a roach, in typical heraldic way, suggests the name Rochdale. It represents the whole new area mainly centred on the Roch Valley. Like the shield of the former County Borough of Rochdale, it is surrounded by a border, in this case of gold with six red roses, suggesting the boundary of an area drawn from six Lancashire authorities.
The crest itself is composed of the emblems, taken from the former Rochdale arms, representing the characteristic local industries - woolpack, fleece, millrind, and cotton plants. These stand for the textile and engineering industries which have long been important to the whole area. The fleece is also the emblem of Milnrow UDC and the cotton is seen in the Borough of Middleton arms.
The golden eagle of Rome, commemorates the association of Littleborough with one of the famous relics of the Roman occupation of this region - the road over Blackstone Edge. This is shown laid on a base of Pennine moorland on which the whole arms stands. For a necessary distinguishing emblem, the eagle's neck is encircled with a white ribbon from which hangs a ram's head and neck, the emblem of the Wardle UDC. The falcon from the crest of the Borough of Heywood, also coloured gold and adapted from the crest of the Heywood family. It also has a ribbon from which hangs the black pierced mullet of spurrowel of the Asshetons, from the arms of Middleton.


ROSSENDALE BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Party per fess Azure and Gules on a Fess wavy Argent between in chief a Shoe toe cap downwards the lace tied all Or enclosed by two Bales of Cotton proper and in base a Ram's Head caboshed Argent five Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure a Rocky Mount proper thereon a Shuttle Or furnished Argent and sejant thereupon a Squirrel proper holding between the forelegs a Hazel Branch also proper, Mantled Gules and Azure doubled Argent and Or.
SUPPORTERS: On a compartment of Moorland with a Shallow Valley in the midst proper on the dexter a Stag and on the sinister a Wolf each reposing the interior foot upon a Tree Stump growing therefrom an Oak Branch fructed all proper.
BADGE: On a Mount Vert between on each side a growing Cotton Plant a Block of Stone with Lewis attached in front of a circular Chain and within the same and resting upon the block a Stag's Head caboshed the attires transfixing and supporting the upper links of the chain all proper.

Motto 'PROSPERITY THROUGH ENDEAVOUR'.
Granted 28th November 1975.

The Borough of Rossendale was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Bacup, the Borough of Haslingden, the Borough of Rawtenstall, part of the Ramsbottom Urban District and the Whitworth Urban District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

rossendale bc arms
rossendale badge
Badge

The wavy white band with five red roses represents the union of five former Lancashire authorities in Rossendale. The bales of cotton were common to the arms of the Borough of Bacup and the Borough of Rawtenstall, together with the shoe they refer to local industries. The punning ram's head was part of the device of the Ramsbottom UDC.
The Squirrel seen in the Rawtenstall crest and the Bacup arms recalls the Forest of Rossendale. The rocky mount, weaver's shuttle and hazel branch from the arms and crest of the Borough of Haslingden are allusive to local topography, local industry and that town's name.
The stag and wolf, derived from those in the Bacup and Rawtenstall arms, are a further reference to the Forest of Rossendale.


ST HELENS METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (MERSEYSIDE)

ARMS: Argent two Bars Azure overall a Cross Sable in the first quarter a Saltire couped Gules in the second quarter a Griffin segreant Sable beaked and armed Or in the third quarter a Cross flory Gules voided and in the fourth quarter a Cross crosslet fitchy also Gules.
CREST: Issuing from an Ancient Crown Or a Ram's Head Argent armed Or charged on the neck with two Fleur de Lys Gules and holding in the mouth a Slip of Laurel proper; Mantled Azure doubled Argent.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Lion guardant Or charged with seven Fleur de Lys Gules and on the sinister a Griffin Sable armed Or the wings barry of seven Sable and Or.

Granted ?
Motto 'PROSPERITAS IN EXCELSIS' - Flourishing well.

The Metropolitan Borough of St Helens was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of St Helens, part of the Ashton-in-Makerfield Urban District, part of the Billinge and Winstanley Urban District, the Haydock Urban District, the Newton le Willows Urban District, the Rainford Urban District and part of the Whiston Rural District.

Picture taken from International Civic Arms.

st helens mbc arms

The black cross is from the arms of Haydock and Eccleston and the two blue bars from the arms of Parr. The red diagonal cross is of the Gerards and represents Ashton and Seneley Green and the black griffin of Bold represents Rainhill, Bold and also Whiston RDC. These devices were displayed on the arms of the County Borough of St. Helens. The red cross is of the Pilkingtons represents Windle and red cross crosslet is of Billinge.
The crest above the helmet is that of Lord Newton representing Newton UDC and Haydock UDC. This crest is suitably differenced by the inclusion of two red fleur de lys on the body of the Ram which is issuant out of a ducal crown of gold.
The supporters, a golden lion and a black griffin are differenced by seven red fleur de lys on the lion and seven gold and black bars on the wing of the griffin to denote the seven constituent authorities which make up the Borough.
The motto is taken from the Rainford Council badge of office.


SALFORD CITY COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Azure a Shuttle erect between five Bees volant two two and one on a Chief Or a three-masted Ship of the 19th century in full sail proper between two Millrinds Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Griffin Gules gorged with a Collar of Steel proper supporting a Staff Or flying therefrom a forked Pennon Argent charged with three Boars' Heads erased and erect in Fess Sable langued Gules.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Gules gorged with a Chain of Steel proper pendant therefrom a Pentagon Argent that on the dexter charged with a Pheon Sable that on the sinister with a Boar's Head erased Gules armed Or langued Azure and each holding in the interior forepaw a Miner's Pickaxe proper.
BADGE: Within a Circlet Argent fimbriated Or set thereon five letters S Azure a Fountain charged with five Sallow leaves the stalks conjoined in the centre proper.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA LEX' - The welfare of the people is the highest law.
Granted 10th June 1974.

The City of Salford was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Salford, the Borough of Eccles, the Borough of Swinton and Pendlebury, the Irlam Urban District and the Worsley Urban District.

salford city mbc arms
salford badge
Badge

The blue background with a gold chief, is like that of the arms of the County Borough of Salford, giving the heraldic colours of the Earls of Chester from whom Salford received its first charter in 1230 A.D. Also from the Salford arms are the gold shuttle and five bees, representing the growth of five industrial communities round a centre of the textile industry. The two black millrinds (the iron centres of millstones) symbolise engineering and the ship, from the crest of the Borough of Eccles signifies the importance of waterways in the area.
The red half-griffin is derived from one of the former Eccles supporters and the boars' heads on the pennon were also seen in the arms of the Irlam UDC. The circlet of steel round the griffin's neck was part of the Irlam crest, symbolising the town's great industry.
The supporters are similar to those of the Borough of Swinton and Pendlebury. Each lion is collared with a steel chain (a further symbol of engineering) holding a white pentagonal medallion. The black 'pheon', or broad arrow, which, with the red lion, appeared in the arms of the Worsley UDC, whilst the boar's head is from the crest of Swinton and Pendlebury, shown in that borough's livery colours of red and gold.
The badge is based on the former Salford badge. The central disc of white and blue waves, symbolising canals and rivers, was seen in the arms of Worsley, Irlam and Eccles. The five sallow-leaves joined together for the five authorities constituting Salford ('the ford by the sallows'). The white collar with gold edges, set with five capital letters S in blue are derived from the Lancastrian 'collar of SS' and denote the City's association with the Duchy of Lancaster. The badge in fact signifies 'the five areas combined in Salford in the Duchy of Lancaster'.


SOUTH RIBBLE BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Argent three Lozenges conjoined in fess Gules each charged the centre one with a Wheel the others with a Cross bottony of the field in chief two Barrulets wavy Azure in base a Sprig of Oak leaved slipped and acorned proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Azure a Phoenix wings elevated and displayed Or charged on the dexter wing with a Cinquefoil between two Roses Gules seeded Or and barbed Vert and on the sinister wing a Rose between two Cinquefoils tinctured as before.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion rampant Or armed and langued Gules collared Azure charged three Lozenges conjoined Argent.
BADGE: Within a circular Chain Or and surmounted with four Roses Gules barbed and seeded in cross proper three Barrulets wavy Azure surmonted by a Sprig of Oak leaved slipped and acorned proper.

Motto 'PROGRESS WITH HUMANITY'.
Granted 1974?.

The Borough of South Ribble was formed by the amalgamation of the Leyland Urban District, the Walton-le-Dale Urban District and part of the Preston Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

south ribble bc arms
south ribble badge
Badge

The two wavy blue bars represent the River Ribble which forms the northern boundary of the Borough. The cog wheel represents the world-wide reputation of the district in transport engineering, and is flanked by the two bottony-style crosses, which can also be found in the arms of the Charnock family of Leyland and Penwortham. The oak spray signifies not only the presence of a vast oak forest in medieval times but also the Council's concern to improve the environment.
The pheonix issuing from flames signifies the birth of the new authority in 1974. The red roses, seen in the arms of the Leyland UDC, reflect the County Palatine of Lancashire and the cinquefoils are from the arms of the old Farington family of Worden and Farington.
The lions are traditional symbols of vigour.


STOCKPORT METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Azure semée of Cross crosslets three Lozenges Or a Bordure of the last charged with three Garbs and as many double headed Eagles displayed alternately of the First.
CREST: Issuant from a Mural Crown Or a Mount Vert thereon a Castle with two Towers proper; Mantled Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Argent that to the dexter gorged with a Collar vairy Or and Gules pendent therefrom by a Chain Gold a Plate charged with a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper that to the sinister likewise collared and pendent from the Collar by a like Chain a Hurt charged with a Garb also Gold.

Arms and crest granted 5th December 1932. Supporters granted 1st December 1959.
Motto 'ANIMO ET FIDE' - With courage and faith.

The Metropolitan Borough of Stockport was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Stockport, the Bredbury and Romiley Urban District, the Cheadle and Gatley Urban District, the Hazel Grove and Bramhill Urban District and the Marple Urban District.

stockport mbc arms

The arms in the centre of the shield are those of the ancient family of Stockport, formerly Lords of the Manor, and the wheatsheaves stand for the Earldom of Chester and the County. The eagles refer to the old local family de Eton.
The mural crown alludes to municipal government and also shows the medieval castle which has long since dis­appeared.
The white lions are from the arms of the de Warren family who were Lords of the Manor from 1370 to 1826). The collars of Vairy Or and Gules allude to Ferrers, Earls of Derby. The red rose is that of Lancaster and the golden wheatsheaf is that of the Earldom of Chester.


TAMESIDE METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Per bend Or and Vert a Bend barry wavy Argent and Azure between in chief a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper and in base a Garb Or.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Gules a demi-lion guardant Or resting the sinister forapaw on an Escutcheon of the Arms, Mantled Gules doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter a Lion Or gorged with a Chain pendent therefrom a Mullet pierced Sable and on the sinister a male Griffln Gules armed beaked irradiated and gorged with a Chain pendent therefrom a Cogwheel Or.

Motto 'INDUSTRY AND INTEGRITY'.

The Metropolitan Borough of Tameside was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Ashton-under-Lyne, the Borough of Dukinfield, the Borough of Hyde, the Borough of Mossley, the Borough of Stalybridge, Urban District of Audenshaw, Urban District of Denton, the Urban District of Droylsden and the Urban District of Longdendale.

tameside mbc arms

The lower half of the shield depicts the gold wheatsheaf emblem of Cheshire on a green background. This is separated by a blue and white band representing the River Tame from the upper half of the shield which contains the red rose of Lancashire on a gold background.
The emblems of the crest have been drawn from the fundamental elements of the arms of the Cheshire, Lancashire and Greater Manchester County Councils.
The left-hand supporter is a gold lion with a black pierced star or rowel, hanging from a chain around its neck. The rowel appeared in the arms of Ashton-under-Lyne, Audenshaw and Stalybridge. The red griffin was chosen depict dynamism and progress, and hanging from a chain around its neck is a gold cogwheel indicating the industrial aspects of Tameside.


TRAFFORD METROPLOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Per fess wavy Argent and Gules a Griffin segreant counter-changed holding between the foreclaws a Tau Cross per pale Vert and Sable.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours between two Sprigs of Oak fructed a dexter Cubit Arm proper charged with a cogwheel Or the hand holding two Flashes of Lightning in saltire Azure.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Unicorn that on the dexter Ermine armed crined tufted and unguled Or and gorged with a Collar Azure charged with a Bar Argent that on the sinister Argent armed crined tufted and unguled Or and charged on the neck with three Lozenges conjoined in fess Sable.
BADGE: A Roundel of the Arms environed of a Wreath of Oak fructed proper.

Motto 'HOLD FAST THAT WHICH IS GOOD'.
Granted 3rd December 1975.

The Metropolitan Borough of Trafford was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Altrincham, the Borough of Sale, the Borough of Stretford, the Bowden Urban District, the Hale Urban District, the Urmston Urban District and the parishes of Carrington, Dunham Massey, Partington and Warburton from the Bucklow Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

trafford bc arms
trafford badge
Badge

The wavy line represents the River Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal cutting across the district. The griffin, as in the arms of the Urmston UDC, is from the arms of the de Trafford family, who held lands in Stretford and Urmston north of the Mersey and also in Dunham Massey on the other side. A griffin is a composite monster, the upper half being that of an eagle and the lower half that of a lion; here the upper part is shown red on white, as in the de Trafford arms, but the lower parts are shown white on red, this linking with the white lion on red which was part of the arms of the Massey family of Dunham Massey, whose barony extended over Dunham, Bowden, Hale, Altrincham, Partington and Sale. The white lion of the Masseys is seen in the arms of the Borough of Altrincham and the Bowden UDC. The Greek Tau cross, representing the letter T for the initial of the name is green and black, denoting that Trafford is both rural and industrial in character.
The wreath and mantling are in the Trafford colours of red and white, which are also those of the Duttons and Warburtons of Warburton. The forearm from the crest of the Borough of Stretford, holds two shafts of lightning, coloured blue, to symbolise the electrical industry. These are suggested by the thunderbolt in the Stretford crest, and are crossed in the shape of a Roman X to suggest the ten communities which comprise the Borough. The gold cogwheel, from the Altrincham arms, indicates the engineering industries. The two branches of oak are derived from the oak-tree in the Urmston arms in reference to the many wooded and rural areas of Trafford.
The ermine unicorn, one of the supporters of the Borough of Altrincham, is derived from the crest of the Grey Earls of Stamford and Warrington, and the blue and white barred collar is derived from their shield. The ermine unicorn represents, not only that borough, but also Bowden, Dunham Massey, and Partington; and was part of the crest of the Bowden UDC. The other unicorn is derived from the crest of the Carringtons, kinsmen of the Massies of Sale, whose three black lozenges or diamonds are also seen in the Carringtons shield. This unicorn was one of the supporters of the Borough of Sale, and refers to the family's lands in Sale and Carrington. He is charged on the neck with the three black lozenges from the two families' arms, which appear in those of Sale.


WARRINGTON BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Per fess Or and Ermine in chief between two Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper a Lion passant guardant in base six Lioncels rampant three two and one Gules on a chief Azure between two Garbs Or a Pale Sable fimbriated and charged with a Wolf's Head erased Argent.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules upon a Rock proper a Unicorn forcene Argent armed maned and unguled Or supporting between the forelegs a Sword erect proper hilt pommel and quillons Or.

Motto 'DEUS DAT INCREMENTUM' - God giveth the increase.
Granted 1974.

The Borough of Warrington was formed by the amalgamation of the former County Borough of Warrington, part of the Golborne Urban District, the Lymm Urban District, part of the Runcorn Rural District, the Warrington Rural District and part of the Whiston Rural District.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

warrington bc arms

The six "lioncels" or little lions on ermine are from the arms of the former County Borough of Warrington, these were derived from the arms of the first Lord of Warrington, Paganus de Vilars. The red lion represents Lancashire, being the arms of Edmund the first Earl of Lancaster and reminds us that a large part of the new Borough had been for many years in that County. The red roses are used to represent the Golborne UDC and the Warrington RDC. The silver wolf's head on a black background represents Cheshire, the area in which the new Borough now lies, for it was the charge used on the arms of the first Earl of Chester, Hugh Lupus. The two golden wheatsheaves on a blue background represent the two Cheshire authorities incorporated in the new Borough - Lymm UDC and Runcorn RDC.
The unicorn, like that of the former County Borough, is derived from the crest of the Boteler family, but it was necessary to add the sword from the arms of the Cheshire County Council between its forelegs for difference.


WEST LANCASHIRE DISTRICT COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Argent on a Grassy Mount issuing in base proper a representation of the Church of Ormskirk also proper between three Roses two and one Gules barbed and seeded proper on a Chief Azure between two Garbs Or each enclosed by four Fleurs-de-Lys two and two a Lion rampant guardant Argent.
CREST: A Mural Crown proper issuing therefrom in Flames also proper a Phoenix wings displayed Gules gorged with a Chain pendant therefrom a Miner's Lamp in front of a Shovel and Pick Axe in saltire all gold; Mantling Azure and Gules lined Or and Argent.

Motto 'SALUS POPULI SUPREMA LEX' - The wellbeing of the people is the supreme law.
Granted 1983.

The West Lancashire District was formed by the amalgamation of the Ormskirk Urban District, the Skelmersdale and Holland Urban District, part of the West Lancashire Rural District and part of the Wigan Rural District.

west lancashire dc arms

The main feature of the Arms is a representation of Ormskirk Church set upon a grassy mount which compares with Ormskirk Church in reality, which has just such amount of grass about it. The Church on its mount is accompanied by three Lancashire roses. The lion and fleurs-de-lys are derived from the former Up Holland badge and the sheafs are derived from the former Skelmersdale badge, but now also represent the agricultural nature of the District.
The mural crown is a common civil symbol, which together with the Phoenix depicts the new Authority created by local government reorganisation. The miner's pick, shovel and lamp makes the whole crest appropriate to the area covered by West Lancashire District Council as well as providing a particular reference to Skelmersdale as a mining community in the last century.
The motto was used by the former West Lancashire RDC.


WIGAN METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Lozengy Or and Sable each Lozenge Or charged with a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper on a Chief Sable a Lion couchant guardant Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours in front of a Mountain Ash (Wiggin Tree) fructed proper a Castle triple towered Argent the centre tower ensigned by an Ancient Crown Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion crowned with an Ancient Crown Or and on the sinister side a Sparrowhawk close proper belled Or the whole upon a Compartment representing a Grassy Mount proper.

Motto 'PROGRESS WITH UNITY'.
Granted ?.

The Metropolitan Borough of Wigan was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Wigan, the Borough of Leigh, the Abram Urban District, the Ashton-in-Makerfield Urban District (part), the Aspull Urban District, the Atherton Urban District, the Billinge and Winstanley Urban District (part), the Golborne Urban District (part), the Hindley Urban District, the Ince-in-Makerfield Urban District, the Orrell Urban District, the Standish Urban District, the Tyldesley Urban District and the Wigan Rural District (part).

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

wigan_mbc arms

The black lozenges, like those in the arms of the Atherton UDC, the Golborne UDC and the Hindley UDC, allude to coal mining. The red roses refer to the County of Lancashire, and also featured in the arms of Golborne and Hindley. The gold lion couchant is taken from the crest of the County Borough of Wigan and features in one of the ancient seals of that borough.
The crowned castle is taken from the arms of the County Borough of Wigan, the castle and crown are also from one of the boroughs medieval seals. The mountain ash or Wiggin Tree is chosen as a pun on the name of the district. Branches of this tree are borne by the former Wigan supporters and the tree features in several of the borough's medieval seals.
The crowned lion is derived from the former Wigan arms and crest and the sparrowhawk occurs in the arms of the Borough of Leigh and in the crest of the Atherton UDC, being derived from the arms of the Atherton family.


WIRRAL METROPOLITAN BOROUGH COUNCIL (UA) (MERSEYSIDE)

ARMS: Vert issuant from the base a Trident erect pendant therefrom by the strings a Bugle Horn Or all between two Flaunches Argent on each two Bars wavy Azure.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within a Crown Palisade Or upon a Red Sandstone Rock between two Sprigs of Bog Myrtle (Myrica gale Linnaeus) an Oystercatcher (Haemotopus ostralegus) rising proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Lion Gules gorged with a Collar dancetty of two points downward Argent and on the sinister side a Lion Argent gorged with a like Collar Gules each holding aloft in the interior forepaw a Crosier head outward Or.
BADGE: On an Oval Vert fimbriated issuant from the base a Trident erect pendant there from by the strings a Bugle Horn Or.

Motto 'BY FAITH AND FORESIGHT'.
Granted 10th August 1976.

The Metropolitan Borough of Wirral was formed by the amalgamation of the County Borough of Birkenhead, the County Borough of Wallasey, the Borough of Bebington, the Urban District of Hoylake and the Urban District of Wirral.

wirral mbc arms
wirral badge
Badge

The shield like that of the Hoylake UDC, symbolises the Wirral peninsula, with a green background between white and blue waves for the Mersey and Dee estuaries. The gold trident is from the crest of the County Borough of Wallasey, epitomising the varied maritime activities of the Wirral - ports, shipbuilding, ferrying, fishing, sailing, seaside holiday resorts. Suspended from the trident is a conventionalised representation of the Wirral Horn, seen in the arms of Wallasey and the device of the Wirral UDC. This recalls the tenure of the Master Forestership of the Forest of Wirral by 'cornage', the actual horn eventually coming to the Stanley family.
The crest with its green and gold mantling typifies the rural parts of the Wirral and the sands of the coastal area. On a sandstone rock representing Hilbre Island and the high rocky areas of the middle of the peninsula is the oystercatcher from Hoylake's crest, the bird that is seen in huge numbers on the Deeside area particularly. Flanking the rock are two sprigs of the Bog Myrtle or Sweet Gale, typical of the area, and the whole is enclosed within a gold 'palisade' crown - a coronet of palings signifying protection of these distinctive features of the district. Five points indicate the five areas of the Borough.
The red lion is from the heraldry of Randle Meschines, Third Earl of Chester, who formed the entire Hundred of Wirral into a Forest administered by the Master Foresters from Storeton in the modern Bebington area. The crosier in the lion's paw represents St. Werburgh's Abbey at Chester, whose manors, churches or lands in Wirral included Bebington, Bromborough (site of an earlier Saxon monastery), Eastham, Childer Thornton, Raby and Neston, all or parts of which were also in Bebington Borough. The white lion recalls the Masseys, founders of Birkenhead Priory, in whose arms, as in those of the County Borough of Birkenhead, the lion and crosier appear, though in the civic arms the colour of the lion was changed. The white lion is also that of the Domvilles who held Brimstage in Bebington. For necessary distinction, each lion wears a collar in the form of a letter W.
The motto is suggested by words in the mottoes of Birkenhead (Fides - 'Faith') and Hoylake (Prospice - 'Look ahead').


WYRE BOROUGH COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Or on a Pile Azure between five Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper issuant from Water barry wavy of four Argent and Azure a Lymphad sail furled Or flying flags and pennon of St. George.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours within a Circlet of four Sprigs of Heather proper and four Escallops reversed Argent alternately a representation of a Fylde Windmill proper.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Wolf Argent and on the sinister side a Lion Or each gorged with a Collar Azure charged with a Barrulet wavy Argent pendent therefrom a Pentagon that on the dexter Or charged with a Martlet Azure that on the sinister Gules charged with a Cinquefoil Ermine.
BADGE: Within a Garland of five Roses Gules barbed seeded stalked and leaved proper a Fountain charged with the Sails of a Windmill proper.

Motto 'UTRAQUE PARTE FLUMINIS' - On either side of the river.
Granted 3rd December 1975.

The Borough of Wyre was formed by the amalgamation of the Borough of Fleetwood, the Poulton-le-Fylde Urban District, the Preesall Urban District, the Thornton Cleveleys Urban District and the Garstang Rural District.

wyre bc arms
wyre badge
Badge

The shield is a kind of heraldic map of the district. The blue 'pile' represents the Wyre Estuary, grouped round which are five red roses of Lancaster on gold, as in the County arms. The rose appears in each of the arms of the five constituent councils - The Borough of Fleetwood, Thornton Cleveleys UDC, Poulton-le-Fylde UDC, Preesall UDC and Garstang RDC, and represents them in that geographical order. The ancient galley in gold upon waves, is common to the arms of Fleetwood, Poulton-le-Fylde and Preesall, the sites of ancient and modern Wyre ports.
The blue and gold of the wreath are the heraldic colours of the Butlers, mediaeval Lords of Amounderness, and of the Fleetwood family. The circlet of alternate sprigs of heather and white scallop shells represents the eastern fell country around Garstang and the seaside on the west. Rising from the circlet is a typical Fylde windmill of the kind found in the western and central areas.
The white wolf is from the heraldry of the Fleetwood family (for Fleetwood, Thornton Cleveleys, Poulton-le-Fylde and the Hackinsall part of Preesall). The collar of blue and white waves is for the Wyre, from which hangs a pentagon (reminder of the five united Councils) showing a blue martlet on gold from the arms of the Fleetwoods and the Elletsons of Parrox in Preesall. The gold lion is that of the de Lancaster family, which appeared on the old Garstang Borough seal. He has a similar collar and pentagon showing the ermine cinquefoil on red of the Hamilton family.
The Motto, expressing the area's situation around the Wyre, is a phrase from Revelations XXII, 2 in the Latin of the Vulgate.


TOWN AND PARISH COUNCILS

ALDERLEY EDGE PARISH COUNCIL (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Argent on a Bend Azure between two Cross crosslets fitchy Sable a Stag’s Head caboshed between two Garbs Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours upon a Red Sandstone Cliff proper a Griffin segreant Gules holding in the dexter forefoot a Cresset Sable enflamed proper.
BADGE: A Stag’s Head caboshed Or between the attires a Cresset issuant Sable enflamed proper.

Motto 'IN PRAECIPITI STANTEM' - Steadfast on the Edge or Standing at the very Edge.
Granted 5th September 1974.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

alderley edge pc arms
alderley edge badge
Badge

The gold stag's head is from the arms of the Stanley family, Baron Stanley of Alderley was seated at the Old Hall and later Park House. The two sheaves are from the arms of the Cheshire County Council and the two black cross crosslets fitchy are from the arms of the Davenport family.
The red cliff represents "The Edge" - the sandstone cliff, which gave the town its name. On the cliff is the red griffin of the de Trafford family, who since the 15th century held most of the land in the area. The flaming cresset doubless refers to the former copper and lead mining and allied industries.
The motto is a reference to the position of the village in relation to the topography of the area.


CLITHEROE TOWN COUNCIL (LANCS)

ARMS: Azure on a Mount in base Vert a Castle of three domed Towers each flying a Pennon Or.
CREST: Issuant from a Coronet composed of two Crescents Or and as many pierced Mullets Sable set alternately upon a Rim Gold a Lion's Head erased Argent. Mantled Azure doubled Or.
SUPPORTERS: On either side a Lion Purpure gorged with a Chain pendent therefrom an Escutcheon Or charged with a Rose Gules barbed and seeded proper.

Motto 'STABIT SAXUM FLUET AMNIS' - The rock will remain and the river will flow.
Granted 20th February 1952 (being the first issued in the reign of HM Queen Elizabeth II).

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

clitheroe tc arms

The castle, representing the old fortress built on a limestone rock beside the River Ribble, has long been used as an emblem by the town. The castle in the arms follows very closely the desicription of the old Corporation Seal of the Borough.
The white lion's head is from the arms of the Monk family, who were Dukes of Albermarle. General Monk received the lordship from Charles II. The golden crescents are from the arms of the Scott family, who were Dukes of Buccleuch and the pierced mullets are from the arms of the Assheton family. The present head of the Assheton family is Lord Clitheroe of Downham, Lord of the Honour of Clitheroe.
The purple lions are taken from the arms of the de Lacy family, who built the Castle and from whom the town received a charter. The red roses denote the de Lacy connection as Earls of Lincoln with the House of Lancaster and are a general emblem of the County.
The motto reflects the derivation of the name "Clitheroe" from the Celtic "Cled-dwr" - the hill or rock by the water - to which the Saxon "How" - hill - has been added.


CONGLETON TOWN COUNCIL (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Sable on Water in base barry wavy Azure and Argent a Tun between two Conger Eels Argent a Lion statant guardant Or on the Tun.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours a demi Bear muzzled proper with Chain reflexed over the back and sup­porting a Garb Or.
SUPPORTERS: On the dexter side a Wolf Argent and on the sinister side a Lion Purpure armed and langued Or about the neck of each a Chain pendent therefrom two Keys in saltire Or.

Motto 'SIT TIBI SANCTA COHORS COMITUM' - To Thee be the band of comrades dedicated.
Granted 5th September 1967, to the former Congleton Borough Council.

congleton bc arms
congleton unofficial arms
Former unofficial arms

The main part of the shield contains the very ancient "conger-tun" punning motif from a fifteenth century seal, with the royal lion standing on the tun. This was also used as the crest of the former unofficial arms. The water in the base refers to the River Dane.
The bear refers to the nickname of as the "Beartown" from an incident during Elizabethan times when bear baiting was a popular sport. Rumor has it that the Congleton town bear died before the annual Wakes (annual town summer holiday when all industry shut down), so the towns people decided that money set aside to buy a new town bible should be used to buy a new bear so that the celebrations would not spoil. This is recalled in the rhyme: "Congleton rare, Congleton rare, Sold the Bible to buy a Bear". The sheaf links to those in the arms of the Cheshire County Council.
The wolf is derived from the device of a wolf's head said to have been borne by Hugh Lupus, first Norman Earl of Chester. It is used widely in Cheshire as a symbol of the Earldom, which held Congleton. The purple lion is that of the de Lacys, who held Congleton from the 11th century and procured a market charter for Congleton. The chains and crossed keys refer to the ancient custon know as "St. Peter's Chains, or Bells". On the Feast of St. Peter ad vincula, at midnight, the chains were used. They consisted of three broad leathern belts, around which on the outside are a number of bells with rolling bullet clappers. Three acolytes with the belts slung over their shoulders, paraded the principal streets, the clanging chains (which represent those that bound the Apostle) calling the faithful to wake up and pray.


HORWICH TOWN COUNCIL (GREATER MANCHESTER)

ARMS: Vert a Hart courant proper gorged with an Ancient Crown on a Chief or a Cross Flory Gules voided of the Chief between four Pallets two and two Sable all between two Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper.
CREST: On a Wreath Argent and Gules a Huntsman habited and drawing his bow all proper.

Motto 'COPIA EST LABOR' - Industry brings prosperity or Labour brings plenty.
Granted 1st September 1975.

Picture used with permission, not to be reproduced without the express permission of the Horwich Town Council.

horwich

The deer and huntsman are reminders of Horwich as a Royal hunting forest in the middle ages. The two red roses separated by a two pairs of black lines refer to Lancashire and the railway industry of Horwich, where the great locomotive works of the Lancashire and Yorkshire Railway Company where situated. The cross is from the heraldry of the Pilkington family, a member of which Bishop Pilkington was a founder of the nearby Rivington Grammar School.


KNUTSFORD TOWN COUNCIL (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Azure a Saltire between in chief and base two Garbs and in fesse as many Fleurs de Lys Or on a Chief barry wavy of four of the first and Argent an Antique Crown Gules.
CREST: Out of a Mural Crown Gules charged with four Lozenges conjoined in fesse Or a demi-Lion of the first about the neck a Garland of May flowered and leaved proper and holding in the paws an open Book also proper edged and bound Gold.

Motto 'RESPICE ASPICE PROSPICE' - Look to the Past, the Present and the Future.
Granted 22nd November 1955, to the Knutsford Urban District Council.

knutsford tc arms

The main colours of blue and gold are the liveries of the Earldom and County of Chester. The saltire refers to the ancient Cross Town portion of Knutsford and the Cheshire sheaves above and below it are for Over Knutsford and Nether Knutsford. The fleur-de-lys, from the arms of the Leycester family, are for their two other lordships of Tabley and Toft. They also refer to the river Lily. These townships are shown united below a chief of blue and white waves with an ancient crown in red, for the traditional story of "Canute's Ford".
The red mural or walled crown recalls Halton Castle, and the gold lozenges or diamonds on it are from the arms of William Fitz-Nigel, Baron of Halton under the first Norman Earl of Chester, who held the Manor of Knutsford. The red lion is from the arms of the Egerton and Leigh families, and above its neck is a garland of may for the famous Royal May Day Celebrations. The lion holds a book in reference to the novelist Mrs Gaskell and her works and the ancient Grammar School.
The motto is that of the Holland family, Barons and Viscounts of Knutsford.


MORECAMBE TOWN COUNCIL (LANCASHIRE)

ARMS: Per Chevron Or and Azure in chief two Roses Gules each charged with a Rose Argent barbed seeded slipped and leaved proper and in base a Fishing-Boat in full sail of the fourth.

Motto 'BEAUTY SURRONDS HEALTH ABOUNDS'.
Granted 24th February 1926, to the Morecambe and Heysham Borough Council.

morecambe tc arms

The united roses were adopted to denote that a large portion of this Lancashire town's population has migrated here from Yorkshire. The boat refers to the old fishing industry, and can also be seen as a reference to the sailing undertaken in this pleasure and health resort. To which the motto also refers.


NORTHWICH TOWN COUNCIL (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Azure a Pall wavy reversed Argent between three Garbs Or.
CREST: On a Wreath of the Colours an ancient three-masted Ship pennons flying Or the mainsail Azure charged with a Wyvern sejant Argent the foresail Gules charged with a Mullet of six points Gold and the mizzen sail also Gules charged with a Fountain.
BADGE: An Eagle displayed Azure ducally crowned Gules charged on the breast and wings with three Garbs Or.

Motto 'SAL EST VITA' - Salt is life.
Granted 10th September 1962, to the Northwich Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

northwich tc arms

The three gold wheatsheaves on blue, are those of the Earldom of Chester, and relate to the County and manorial history of the town. Since they also occur in the arms of the Vernon and Leftwich families. The reversed Y-shaped figure with wavy edges represents the confluence of the Rivers Weaver and Dane, and define the situation of the town irrespective of the future changes in its boundaries or status.
Blue and white are the heraldic colours for water and mineral springs, indicative of Northwich's association with the salt industry. They also appear in the colours of the Stanleys (Earls of Derby), and the Venables, holders in chief of Northwich and Witton. The golden ship depicts the importance of the Weaver Navigation in the industrial history of Northwich. The mainsail bears the wyvern of the Venables family, and the other sails a gold star on red, from the Brunner arms, and an heraldic fountain from the Mond crest. This symbol is believed to have been the origin of the ICI Mark. The star and fountain display the connection of Brunner, Mond and Company, the predecessors of ICI, with industrial Northwich. Wyvern, once spelt "wivre" and pronounced "weever", is heraldic wordplay on the river-name.
The motto is a fitting allusion to Northwich as a principal salt and brineproducing town from Roman times.


SANDBACH TOWN COUNCIL (CHESHIRE)

ARMS: Azure on a Fesse Argent between in chief two Garbs and in base a representation of the Saxon Crosses of Sandbach Or a Fesse Gules.
CREST: On a Wreath Or and Azure in front of a Garb Or banded with Silk Ribbons alternately Azure and Gules a demi-Wheel of the last.

Motto 'PRINCIPIA NON HOMINES'.
Granted 20th June 1956, to the Sandbach Urban District Council. Transferred by an Order in Council 13th October 1980.

sandbach tc arms

The sheaves are from the arms of the Cheshire County Council and the Saxon Crosses have been a symbol of Sandbach for many years. The two sandstone structures are recognised as one of the finest Saxon monuments in Britain and are in the care of English Heritage.
The red half-wheel denotes the automotive and heavy engineering industries.


ULVERSTON TOWN COUNCIL (CUMBRIA)
Link to Ulverston TC Web Site

ARMS: Argent two Bars Gules a Pale Sable fretty of the first between two Abbots' Crosiers addorsed also Sable on a Chief Azure an Anchor between two Fleurs-de-Lys Or.
CREST: Out of a Coronet composed of four Roses Gules barbed and seeded proper set upon a Rim Or a demi Wolf Sable breathing Flames and gorged with a Leather Collar proper buckled and pendent therefrom by a Chain an Escutcheon Gold charged with a Ray of Lightning throughout in bend also Gules surmounted of an Ankh Vert and supporting a Garb also Gold; Mantled Gules doubled Argent.

Motto 'OPTIMUM SUFFICIT' - Only the best is enough.
Granted 1st December 1955, to the Ulverston Urban District Council.

Picture used with permission, do not reproduce.

ulverston tc arms

The shield expresses the ecclesiastical and manorial connections of Ulverston. The red bars on white are part of the arms of the de Lancasters, Barons of Kendal and holders of Ulverston and Furness Abbey. The crosiers refer to the Abbey and to Conishead Priory. The black portion fretted with white is from the Harrington arms. The anchor and fleurs-de-lys are from the arms of the Barrow family. The anchor also occurs in the arms of the Gale-Braddylls of Conishead and is a reference to the former Port of Ulverston. The fleur-de-lys and their blue background also appear in the arms of the Dukes of Buccleuch, to whom the Manor descended.
The red roses are for Lancashire, the town having formerly been in that county, and the black wolf refers to name of the town "Wulf-heres-tun". The other emblems are for local industries; the agricultural market is symbolised by the gold sheaf, the flames are for the formerly important iron-smelting, the leather collar represents the tanning industry, the chain hanging from it is for the engineering industry, and supports a gold shield carrying a red lightning flash for the electrical industry and the Egyptian Ankh or Cross of Life, in green, for the anti-biotic manufacturing activities. The motto is based on that of the Barrow family 'PARUM SUFFICIT' - a little is enough.


back to contents page
back to front page
back to index page